Trivial topology

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In topology, a topological space with the trivial topology is one where the only open sets are the empty set and the entire space. Such spaces are commonly called indiscrete, anti-discrete, or codiscrete. Intuitively, this has the consequence that all points of the space are "lumped together" and cannot be distinguished by topological means. Every indiscrete space is a pseudometric space in which the distance between any two points is zero.

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The trivial topology is the topology with the least possible number of open sets, namely the empty set and the entire space, since the definition of a topology requires these two sets to be open. Despite its simplicity, a space X with more than one element and the trivial topology lacks a key desirable property: it is not a T0 space.

Other properties of an indiscrete space Xmany of which are quite unusualinclude:

In some sense the opposite of the trivial topology is the discrete topology, in which every subset is open.

The trivial topology belongs to a uniform space in which the whole cartesian product X×X is the only entourage.

Let Top be the category of topological spaces with continuous maps and Set be the category of sets with functions. If G : TopSet is the functor that assigns to each topological space its underlying set (the so-called forgetful functor), and H : SetTop is the functor that puts the trivial topology on a given set, then H (the so-called cofree functor) is right adjoint to G. (The so-called free functor F : SetTop that puts the discrete topology on a given set is left adjoint to G.) [1] [2]

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