Tryptophan dehydrogenase

Last updated
tryptophan dehydrogenase
Identifiers
EC number 1.4.1.19
CAS number 94047-13-9
Databases
IntEnz IntEnz view
BRENDA BRENDA entry
ExPASy NiceZyme view
KEGG KEGG entry
MetaCyc metabolic pathway
PRIAM profile
PDB structures RCSB PDB PDBe PDBsum
Gene Ontology AmiGO / QuickGO

In enzymology, a tryptophan dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.19) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

The Enzyme Commission number is a numerical classification scheme for enzymes, based on the chemical reactions they catalyze. As a system of enzyme nomenclature, every EC number is associated with a recommended name for the respective enzyme.

Catalysis chemical process

Catalysis is the process of increasing the rate of a chemical reaction by adding a substance known as a catalyst, which is not consumed in the catalyzed reaction and can continue to act repeatedly. Because of this, only very small amounts of catalyst are required to alter the reaction rate in principle.

Chemical reaction Process that results in the interconversion of chemical species

A chemical reaction is a process that leads to the chemical transformation of one set of chemical substances to another. Classically, chemical reactions encompass changes that only involve the positions of electrons in the forming and breaking of chemical bonds between atoms, with no change to the nuclei, and can often be described by a chemical equation. Nuclear chemistry is a sub-discipline of chemistry that involves the chemical reactions of unstable and radioactive elements where both electronic and nuclear changes can occur.

L-tryptophan + NAD(P)+ + H2O (indol-3-yl)pyruvate + NH3 + NAD(P)H + H+

The 4 substrates of this enzyme are L-tryptophan, NAD+, NADP+, and H2O, whereas its 5 products are (indol-3-yl)pyruvate, NH3, NADH, NADPH, and H+.

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a cofactor that is central to metabolism. Found in all living cells, NAD is called a dinucleotide because it consists of two nucleotides joined through their phosphate groups. One nucleotide contains an adenine nucleobase and the other nicotinamide. NAD exists in two forms: an oxidized and reduced form, abbreviated as NAD+ and NADH respectively.

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate coenzyme

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, abbreviated NADP+ or, in older notation, TPN (triphosphopyridine nucleotide), is a cofactor used in anabolic reactions, such as the Calvin cycle and lipid and nucleic acid syntheses, which require NADPH as a reducing agent. It is used by all forms of cellular life.

Water Chemical compound with formula H2O

Water is a transparent, tasteless, odorless, and nearly colorless chemical substance, which is the main constituent of Earth's streams, lakes, and oceans, and the fluids of most living organisms. It is vital for all known forms of life, even though it provides no calories or organic nutrients. Its chemical formula is H2O, meaning that each of its molecules contains one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms, connected by covalent bonds. Water is the name of the liquid state of H2O at standard ambient temperature and pressure. It forms precipitation in the form of rain and aerosols in the form of fog. Clouds are formed from suspended droplets of water and ice, its solid state. When finely divided, crystalline ice may precipitate in the form of snow. The gaseous state of water is steam or water vapor. Water moves continually through the water cycle of evaporation, transpiration (evapotranspiration), condensation, precipitation, and runoff, usually reaching the sea.

This enzyme belongs to the family of oxidoreductases, specifically those acting on the CH-NH2 group of donors with NAD+ or NADP+ as acceptor. The systematic name of this enzyme class is L-tryptophan:NAD(P)+ oxidoreductase (deaminating). Other names in common use include NAD(P)+-L-tryptophan dehydrogenase, L-tryptophan dehydrogenase, L-Trp-dehydrogenase, and TDH. This enzyme has at least one effector, calcium.

In biochemistry, an oxidoreductase is an enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of electrons from one molecule, the reductant, also called the electron donor, to another, the oxidant, also called the electron acceptor. This group of enzymes usually utilizes NADP or NAD+ as cofactors. Transmembrane oxidoreductases create electron transport chains in bacteria, chloroplasts and mitochondria, including respiratory complexes I, II and III. Some others can associate with biological membranes as peripheral membrane proteins or be anchored to the membranes through a single transmembrane helix.

In biochemistry, an effector molecule is usually a small molecule that selectively binds to a protein and regulates its biological activity. In this manner, effector molecules act as ligands that can increase or decrease enzyme activity, gene expression, or cell signaling. Effector molecules can also directly regulate the activity of some mRNA molecules (riboswitches).

Calcium Chemical element with atomic number 20

Calcium is a chemical element with the symbol Ca and atomic number 20. As an alkaline earth metal, calcium is a reactive metal that forms a dark oxide-nitride layer when exposed to air. Its physical and chemical properties are most similar to its heavier homologues strontium and barium. It is the fifth most abundant element in Earth's crust and the third most abundant metal, after iron and aluminium. The most common calcium compound on Earth is calcium carbonate, found in limestone and the fossilised remnants of early sea life; gypsum, anhydrite, fluorite, and apatite are also sources of calcium. The name derives from Latin calx "lime", which was obtained from heating limestone.

Related Research Articles

In enzymology, a strombine dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.1.22) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, an indole-3-acetaldehyde reductase (NADH) (EC 1.1.1.190) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, an indole-3-acetaldehyde reductase (NADPH) (EC 1.1.1.191) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, an indolelactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.110) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, a (R)-4-hydroxyphenyllactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.222) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, a 3-(imidazol-5-yl)lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.111) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, a 2-oxoaldehyde dehydrogenase (NADP+) (EC 1.2.1.49) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

Aldehyde dehydrogenase (NAD+) class of enzymes

In enzymology, an aldehyde dehydrogenase (NAD+) (EC 1.2.1.3) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

Aminomuconate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase class of enzymes

In enzymology, an aminomuconate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.32) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

Tryptophan 2-dioxygenase class of enzymes

In enzymology, a tryptophan 2'-dioxygenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

Alanine dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

Alanopine dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.1.17) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

Beta-alanopine dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.1.26) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, a D-lysopine dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.1.16) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, a N-methylalanine dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.17) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, an opine dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.1.28) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, a phenylalanine dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.20) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, a saccharopine dehydrogenase (NAD+, L-lysine-forming) (EC 1.5.1.7) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

In enzymology, a tauropine dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.1.23) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction

Indole-3-pyruvate monooxygenase (EC 1.14.13.168, YUC2 (gene), spi1 (gene)) is an enzyme with systematic name indole-3-pyruvate,NADPH:oxygen oxidoreductase (1-hydroxylating, decarboxylating). This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reaction

References

    Digital object identifier Character string used as a permanent identifier for a digital object, in a format controlled by the International DOI Foundation

    In computing, a digital object identifier (DOI) is a persistent identifier or handle used to identify objects uniquely, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). An implementation of the Handle System, DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos.