Tualatin station

Last updated

Tualatin
WES Commuter Rail station
Tualatin station platform view, showing gauntlet track (2015).jpg
Tualatin station in 2015
General information
Location18955 SW Boones Ferry Road
Tualatin, Oregon, U.S.
Coordinates 45°23′00″N122°45′52″W / 45.383283°N 122.764556°W / 45.383283; -122.764556 Coordinates: 45°23′00″N122°45′52″W / 45.383283°N 122.764556°W / 45.383283; -122.764556
Owned by TriMet
Line(s) Portland and Western Railroad
Platforms1 side platform
Tracks1
ConnectionsTriMet bus, Tualatin Shuttle
Construction
Structure type At-grade
Parking129 spaces
Bicycle facilities Lockers and racks
Disabled accessYes
History
OpenedFebruary 2, 2009 (2009-02-02)
Services
Preceding station TriMet icon.svg TriMet Following station
Wilsonville Transit Center
Terminus
WES Commuter Rail Tigard Transit Center
Location
Tualatin station

Tualatin is a train station in Tualatin, Oregon, United States, served by TriMet as part of WES Commuter Rail. Situated next to Hedges Green Shopping Center on Southwest Boones Ferry Road, it is the fourth station southbound on the commuter rail line, which operates between Beaverton and Wilsonville in the Portland metropolitan area's Washington County. The station was approved in 2004 as part of the Washington County Commuter Rail Project, but construction was delayed following a dispute with its location and the amount of available parking. A compromise was eventually reached, and it was completed in time for the line's opening in 2009. The station includes a 129-space park and ride and connections to the Tualatin Shuttle and TriMet bus routes 76–Hall/Greenburg and 97–Tualatin–Sherwood Rd. WES connects with the Blue and Red lines of MAX Light Rail at Beaverton Transit Center.

Contents

History

In 1908, the Oregon Electric Railway (OE) established an interurban line between Portland and Salem, which at its peak extended as far south as Eugene. [1] OE built a depot in Tualatin that is believed to have stood on the site of the present-day WES station. [2] When automobiles began to dominate in the 1920s, ridership on the interurban failed to grow as projected, and OE ended passenger rail service in May 1933. Diesel freight trains continued to utilize the route into the 1990s. [1] [3] Washington County officials started planning for a commuter rail line between Beaverton and Wilsonville in 1996. [3] In 2001, local governments approved the Washington County Commuter Rail Project, [4] which included plans for a station in Tualatin along Boones Ferry Road, in consideration of the city's transportation plan. [5] The Federal Transit Administration authorized funding for the project in 2004, [4] and construction began in October 2006. [6]

After construction of the line had started, nearby grocery retailer Haggen Food & Pharmacy tried to have the station in Tualatin moved; Haggen argued that the station did not have enough parking and that it would worsen traffic around the area. [7] [8] Haggen's protest led to a delay in the station's construction, which had been scheduled to begin in July 2007. [7] [9] The city and Portland's regional transit agency, TriMet, countered that the location was selected in 2001 and was re-affirmed in 2005 with no objections from Haggen; TriMet further threatened to forgo building the station. [5] In August, Haggen and TriMet compromised; the station's location remained as planned but with additional parking. [5] [10] The station's construction commenced on January 9, 2008, with a groundbreaking ceremony attended by local dignitaries. [11] The public artwork was installed that September. [12] Tualatin station was completed in time for the opening of the line, by then named "Westside Express Service" (WES), on February 2, 2009. [13] [14]

Station details

Park and ride
Side platform, doors will open on the left or right
Northbound WES toward Beaverton Transit Center (Tigard Transit Center) 
SouthboundWES toward Wilsonville  (Terminus)

Tualatin station is situated on the east end of Hedges Green Shopping Center near the intersection of Southwest Boones Ferry Road and Seneca Street in downtown Tualatin. [15] [16] It is one of five WES stops along the 14.7-mile (23.7 km) rail segment owned by Portland and Western Railroad. [17] The station has 129 park-and-ride spaces, 24 covered bike racks, and six bike lockers. [18] The side platform measures 146 feet (45 m) in length and 15 feet (4.6 m) in width, covers about 2,000 square feet (190 m2), and sits four feet (1.2 m) above the ground. [2] It features card-only ticket vending machines and a digital information display that shows WES and bus arrival information. [18] The platform shelter exhibits enhancements to TriMet's standard design practices; it includes a clock tower and red brick columns intended to blend in with the neighborhood's existing architectural styles. [10] The Tualatin Development Commission contributed $491,000 for the enhancements. [15]

Tualatin station's public art consists of an interactive sculpture created by Frank Boyden and Brad Rude entitled The Interactivator. It features bronze heads and a vehicle designed to represent the train and the variety of people who ride the line. The vehicle moves along a track and has an animal figure displayed in a scene atop the piece. [19] :28 The shelter's glass windbreak is etched with a willow pattern. [20]

Services

Tualatin is the fourth of five stations southbound on WES, between Tigard Transit Center and the line's southern terminus, Wilsonville station. WES provides a connection to the Blue and Red lines of MAX Light Rail at its northern terminus, Beaverton Transit Center. [21] Service operates only on weekdays during the morning and evening commutes and trains arrive at the station every thirty minutes per direction. [22] [23] A bus stop near Tualatin station connects to TriMet bus routes 76–Hall/Greenburg and 97–Tualatin–Sherwood Rd. [18] Additionally, a fixed-route bus service operated by Ride Connection called the Tualatin Shuttle connects riders between Tualatin station and local employers. As of 2019, the Tualatin Shuttle operates two routes within Tualatin; it coordinates with WES train arrivals and is free to use. [24] [25]

Related Research Articles

Beaverton, Oregon City in Oregon, United States

Beaverton is a city in Washington County, in the U.S. state of Oregon that is located 7 miles (11 km) west of Portland in the Tualatin Valley. The city is among the main cities that make up the Portland metropolitan area. Its population was 97,494 at the 2020 census, making it the second-largest city in the county and the seventh-largest city in Oregon. Beaverton is an economic center for Washington County along with neighboring Hillsboro. It is home to the world headquarters of Nike, Inc., although it sits outside of city limits on unincorporated county land.

MAX Light Rail Light rail system serving Portland, Oregon

The Metropolitan Area Express (MAX) is a light rail system serving the Portland metropolitan area in the U.S. state of Oregon. Owned and operated by TriMet, it consists of five color-designated lines that altogether connect the six sections of Portland; the communities of Beaverton, Clackamas, Gresham, Hillsboro, Milwaukie, and Oak Grove; and Portland International Airport to Portland City Center. Service runs seven days a week with headways of between 30 minutes off-peak and three minutes during rush hours. In 2019, MAX had an average daily ridership of 120,900, or 38.8 million annually. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which impacted public transit use globally, annual ridership plummeted, with only 14.8 million riders recorded in 2021.

TriMet, formally known as the Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon, is a public agency that operates mass transit in a region that spans most of the Portland metropolitan area in the U.S. state of Oregon. Created in 1969 by the Oregon legislature, the district replaced five private bus companies that operated in the three counties: Multnomah, Washington, and Clackamas. TriMet started operating a light rail system, MAX, in 1986, which has since been expanded to five lines that now cover 59.7 miles (96.1 km), as well as the WES Commuter Rail line in 2009. It also provides the operators and maintenance personnel for the city of Portland-owned Portland Streetcar system.

Oregon Electric Railway

The Oregon Electric Railway (OE) was an interurban railroad line in the U.S. state of Oregon that linked Portland to Eugene. Service from Portland to Salem began in January 1908. The Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway purchased the system in 1910, and extended service to Eugene in 1912. Regular passenger service in the Willamette Valley ended in May 1933. Freight operations continued and the railway survived into the 1990s, ultimately as a Burlington Northern feeder. Operation as an electric railroad ended July 10, 1945.

MAX Blue Line Light rail line in Portland, Oregon

The MAX Blue Line is a light rail service in Portland, Oregon, United States, operated by TriMet as part of the MAX Light Rail system. The longest line in the network, it travels mainly east–west for approximately 33 miles (53 km) between Hillsboro, Beaverton, Portland, and Gresham, serving 48 stations between Hatfield Government Center and Cleveland Avenue. The line is the busiest of the five MAX lines, carrying an average 55,370 riders daily on weekdays in September 2018. It runs for 2212 hours per day from Monday to Thursday, with headways of between 30 minutes off-peak and five minutes during rush hour. Service runs later in the evening on Fridays and Saturdays and ends earlier on Sundays.

MAX Red Line Light rail line in Portland, Oregon

The MAX Red Line is a light rail service in Portland, Oregon, United States, operated by TriMet as part of the MAX Light Rail system. An airport rail link, it serves 26 stations from central Beaverton through Portland City Center and Northeast Portland to Portland International Airport. From Beaverton Transit Center to Gateway/Northeast 99th Avenue Transit Center, the Red Line interlines with the Blue Line and partially with the Green Line; it then branches to a 5.5-mile (8.9 km) segment to Portland International Airport station. Service runs for 22 hours per day with a headway of 15 minutes during most of the day. The Red Line is the second-busiest service in the MAX system with an average 10,310 passengers per weekday in September 2021.

Pioneer Square South and Pioneer Square North stations Pair of light rail stations in Portland, Oregon

Pioneer Square South and Pioneer Square North are a pair of light rail stations in Portland, Oregon, United States, served by TriMet as part of the MAX Light Rail system. Situated directly west of the Portland Transit Mall on the perimeter of Pioneer Courthouse Square in downtown Portland, facing Yamhill and Morrison streets between Broadway and 6th Avenue, the pair are the 21st and 7th stations eastbound on the Blue Line and the Red Line, respectively. They consist of one side platform each as MAX operates in a one-way pair along this segment; trains traveling eastbound stop at Pioneer Square South while trains traveling westbound stop at Pioneer Square North. With connections to the Green, Orange, and Yellow lines, the Pioneer Square stations, along with the Pioneer Courthouse/Southwest 6th and Pioneer Place/Southwest 5th stations located one block east, mark the only transfer point in the MAX system where riders can board any of the five existing lines.

Transportation in Portland, Oregon Overview of movement of goods and passengers in Portland

Like transportation in the rest of the United States, the primary mode of local transportation in Portland, Oregon is the automobile. Metro, the metropolitan area's regional government, has a regional master plan in which transit-oriented development plays a major role. This approach, part of the new urbanism, promotes mixed-use and high-density development around light rail stops and transit centers, and the investment of the metropolitan area's share of federal tax dollars into multiple modes of transportation. In the United States, this focus is atypical in an era when automobile use led many areas to neglect their core cities in favor of development along interstate highways, in suburbs, and satellite cities.

Portland is "an international pioneer in transit orientated developments."

Beaverton Transit Center Transport hub located in Beaverton, Oregon, U.S.

Beaverton Transit Center is an intermodal passenger transport hub in Beaverton, Oregon, United States. Owned and operated by TriMet, it is served by bus, commuter rail, and light rail. The transit center is MAX Light Rail's 15th station eastbound on the Blue Line and western terminus on the Red Line. It is also the northern terminus of WES Commuter Rail and a hub for bus routes mostly serving the westside communities of the Portland metropolitan area. Beaverton Transit Center is situated on Southwest Lombard Avenue, just north of Southwest Canyon Road in central Beaverton, connected by walkway to Canyon Place Shopping Center. It recorded 9,709 average weekday boardings for all modes in fall 2018, making it TriMet's busiest transit center.

Portland International Airport station Light rail station in Portland, Oregon, United States

Portland International Airport, or just Airport on station signage, is a light rail station in Portland, Oregon, United States, operated by TriMet as part of the MAX Light Rail system. It serves Portland International Airport as the eastern terminus of the Red Line, which connects travelers to downtown Portland and Beaverton. The station is located near the southern end of the arrivals hall of the airport's main passenger terminal. It consists of a wedge-shaped island platform, just beyond which both tracks join because the section approaching the terminal is single-tracked. The station was built as part of the Airport MAX project; construction began in July 2000, and it opened on September 10, 2001. Trains serve the station for 22 hours daily with minimum headways of 15 minutes during most of the day. In late 2018, the station recorded an average of 2,461 weekday boardings.

South Metro Area Regional Transit

South Metro Area Regional Transit (SMART) is a public transit system operated by the city government of Wilsonville, Oregon, United States. The system currently consists of seven routes and is funded by local businesses. It was created when Wilsonville petitioned to withdraw from the TriMet service district in the late 1980s. Offices of the agency are in the former city hall off Wilsonville Road.

MAX Green Line Light rail line in Portland, Oregon

The MAX Green Line is a light rail service in Portland, Oregon, United States, operated by TriMet as part of the MAX Light Rail system. It is 15 miles (24.1 km) long and serves 30 stations from the PSU South stations to Clackamas Town Center Transit Center; it connects Portland State University (PSU), Portland City Center, Northeast Portland, Southeast Portland, and Clackamas. The Green Line is the only service that shares parts of its route with the four other MAX services, sharing the Portland Transit Mall with the Orange and Yellow lines and the Banfield segment of the Eastside MAX with the Blue and Red lines. Southbound from Gateway/Northeast 99th Avenue Transit Center, it operates the Interstate 205 (I-205) segment through to Clackamas Town Center. Service runs for approximately 2112 hours daily with a headway of 15 minutes during most of the day. It is the third-busiest line in the system, carrying an average of 19,160 riders per day on weekdays in September 2019.

Portland and Western Railroad

The Portland and Western Railroad is a 466-mile (750 km) Class II railroad serving the U.S. state of Oregon, and is a wholly owned subsidiary of shortline and regional railroad holding company Genesee & Wyoming Inc. The PNWR includes a subsidiary, the Willamette and Pacific Railroad.

WES Commuter Rail Commuter train system serving northwest Oregon

The Westside Express Service (WES) is a commuter rail line serving part of the Portland metropolitan area's Washington County in the U.S. state of Oregon. Owned by TriMet and operated by Portland & Western Railroad (P&W), the line is 14.7 miles (23.7 km) long and consists of five stations. WES travels north–south just west of Oregon Highway 217 and Interstate 5 (I-5) between the cities of Beaverton, Tigard, Tualatin, and Wilsonville. It connects with MAX Light Rail at Beaverton Transit Center. Service operates on a 30-minute headway on weekdays during the morning and evening rush hours. It carried an average of 1,590 passengers per day in May 2018.

Rail transportation is an important element of the transportation network in the U.S. state of Oregon. Rail transportation has existed in Oregon in some form since 1855, and the state was a pioneer in development of electric railway systems. While the automobile has displaced many uses of rail in the state, rail remains a key means of moving passengers and freight, both within the state and to points beyond its borders.

Wilsonville Transit Center

Wilsonville Transit Center, also called SMART Central at Wilsonville Station, is a bus and commuter rail transport hub in Wilsonville, Oregon, United States. The transit center, which is owned and operated by the City of Wilsonville, is the hub for the South Metro Area Regional Transit (SMART) bus system. The Portland metropolitan area's regional transit agency, TriMet, operates the southern terminus of its WES Commuter Rail at the facility; WES connects with the Blue and Red lines of MAX Light Rail at Beaverton Transit Center. Opened in January 2009, the transit center includes a 400-car park and ride.

Tigard Transit Center

Tigard Transit Center, formally Thomas M. Brian Tigard Transit Center, is a transport hub in Tigard, Oregon, United States, that is owned and operated by TriMet. It is a transfer facility for bus routes mainly serving the westside communities of the Portland metropolitan area and the third southbound station from Beaverton Transit Center on WES Commuter Rail. The transit center is the located in downtown Tigard just south of Oregon Route 99W on Commercial Street. It recorded 1,627 average weekday boardings in fall 2019. The facility opened in 1988 as a bus transit center, and a platform for WES was added in 2009.

Hall/Nimbus station Train station in Beaverton, Oregon

Hall/Nimbus is a train station in Beaverton, Oregon, United States, served by TriMet as part of WES Commuter Rail. It is the second station southbound on the commuter rail line, which runs between Beaverton and Wilsonville in the Portland metropolitan area's Washington County. Opened in February 2009, the TriMet-owned station is located west of Oregon Route 217 near the Washington Square shopping mall on Hall Boulevard. It includes a 50-car park and ride and connections to TriMet bus routes 76–Hall/Greenburg and 78–Beaverton/Lake Oswego. WES connects with the Blue and Red lines of MAX Light Rail at Beaverton Transit Center.

The transportation system of Oregon is a cooperation of complex systems of infrastructure.

Ride Connection Paratransit service in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area, U.S.

Ride Connection is a private, nonprofit organization that provides fixed bus route and paratransit services in the Portland metropolitan area in the U.S. state of Oregon. It was founded as Volunteer Transport, Inc. on May 26, 1988.

References

  1. 1 2 Thompson, Richard (January 1, 2008). Willamette Valley Railways. Arcadia Publishing. p. 29. ISBN   978-0738556017. Archived from the original on February 3, 2021. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  2. 1 2 "Proposed Tualatin Commuter Rail Station and Park & Ride" (PDF). City of Tualatin. January 25, 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 9, 2011. Retrieved October 13, 2008.
  3. 1 2 "WES Commuter Rail" (PDF). TriMet. July 2016. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 9, 2018. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  4. 1 2 "Wilsonville-to-Beaverton commuter train gets OK". Portland Business Journal . May 10, 2004. Archived from the original on May 25, 2011. Retrieved August 20, 2008.
  5. 1 2 3 Bella, Rick (September 26, 2007). "Tualatin rail stop overrides differences". The Oregonian . p. C1.
  6. "TriMet building passenger train line". Portland Business Journal. October 23, 2006. Archived from the original on May 25, 2011. Retrieved August 20, 2008.
  7. 1 2 Tran, My-Thuan (March 20, 2007). "Tualatin station short on parking, firm reports". The Oregonian. p. B3.
  8. Tran, My-Thuan (June 14, 2007). "TriMet, Haggen to meet on moving Tualatin station". The Oregonian. p. D3.
  9. Tran, My-Thuan (April 10, 2007). "West side onboard for risky rail ride". The Oregonian. p. B1.
  10. 1 2 Foyston, John (August 3, 2007). "Businesses OK site for rail station in Tualatin". The Oregonian. p. D3.
  11. Foyston, John; Mayes, Steve (January 8, 2008). "Construction will start on commuter station". The Oregonian. p. C3.
  12. Foyston, John (September 4, 2008). "Ambitious crews install 5 steel sculptures in a day". The Oregonian.
  13. Rivera, Dylan (October 1, 2008). "TriMet delays opening of Westside commuter rail line until February". The Oregonian. Archived from the original on June 17, 2009. Retrieved October 2, 2008.
  14. Crepeau, Megan (February 3, 2009). "Westside commuter rail launch smooth". The Oregonian. p. B2. Archived from the original on October 19, 2014. Retrieved August 15, 2013.
  15. 1 2 Clampet, Jennifer (January 10, 2008). "Even six months late, WES to arrive on time in Tualatin". The Times (Tigard). Archived from the original on July 17, 2011.
  16. "Stop ID 13069 – Tualatin WES Station". TriMet. Archived from the original on February 1, 2019. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  17. Tucker, Libby (May 3, 2007). "Commuter rail project breaks ground in Wilsonville". Daily Journal of Commerce .
  18. 1 2 3 "WES Commuter Rail". TriMet. Archived from the original on January 31, 2019. Retrieved January 30, 2019.
  19. Priester, Mary (2009). The Interactivators: Sculpture for TriMet WES Commuter Rail (PDF). TriMet. ISBN   978-0-9666762-1-1. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 2, 2019. Retrieved June 11, 2019.
  20. "Public Art on Commuter Rail". TriMet. Archived from the original on September 17, 2008. Retrieved August 21, 2008.
  21. WES Commuter Rail (PDF) (Map). TriMet. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 2, 2019. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  22. "WES Commuter Rail, Weekday To Beaverton" (PDF). TriMet. Archived (PDF) from the original on June 10, 2019. Retrieved January 30, 2019.
  23. "WES Commuter Rail, Weekday to Wilsonville" (PDF). TriMet. Archived (PDF) from the original on June 10, 2019. Retrieved January 30, 2019.
  24. "Ride Connection". City of Tualatin. Archived from the original on January 31, 2019. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  25. "Tualatin Shuttle Brochure" (PDF). Ride Connection. July 11, 2016. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 31, 2019. Retrieved January 31, 2019.