UIC classification of locomotive axle arrangements

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The UIC classification of locomotive axle arrangements, sometimes known as German classification [1] or German system, [2] [3] describes the wheel arrangement of locomotives, multiple units and trams. It is set out in the International Union of Railways (UIC) "Leaflet 650 – Standard designation of axle arrangement on locomotives and multiple-unit sets". [4] It is used in much of the world. The United Kingdom uses the Whyte notation. The United States uses the simplified AAR wheel arrangement for modern locomotives.

Contents

Structure

Upper-case letters 
Indicate driving axles, starting at A for a single axle. C thus indicates three consecutive pairs of driving wheels.
Lower-case "o"  
Related to driving axles (minimum 2, "B"), mean that are individually driven by separate traction motors. [5]
Numbers 
Consecutive non-driving axles, starting with 1 for a single axle.
Prime sign " ′ " 
The axles are mounted on a bogie.
Brackets 
Groups letters and numbers describing the same bogie. For example, (A1A) indicates a three-axle bogie with the outer two axles driven. When brackets are used a prime is not needed to indicate a bogie. Mallet locomotives can be indicated by bracketing the front power unit — for example, the Union Pacific Big Boy, 4-8-8-4 in Whyte notation, is (2′D)D2′ in UIC notation.
Plus sign "+" 
The locomotive or multiple unit consists of permanently coupled but mechanically separate vehicles.

Garratt-type locomotives are indicated by bracketing or placing plus signs between all individual units.

Other suffixes
  • h: superheated Steam (German: Heißdampf)
  • n: saturated Steam (German: Nassdampf)
  • v: compound (German: Verbund)
  • Turb: turbine
  • number: number of cylinders
  • t: tank locomotive
  • tr: tram (urban) locomotive
  • E: Engerth-type locomotive
  • G: freight (German: Güterzug, lit. 'freight train'). Also used to indicate shunting locomotives
  • P: passenger (German: Personenzug, lit. 'passenger train')
  • S: fast passenger (German: Schnellzug, lit. 'express train')

The most common wheel arrangements in modern locomotives are Bo′Bo′ and Co′Co′.

Examples

(A1A)(A1A)
Two bogies or wheel assemblies under the unit. Each bogie has one powered axle, one idle axle, and one more powered axle. All powered axles are individually driven by traction motors.
BB
Four powered axles all mounted in the locomotive's frame, driven in pairs, i.e. each pair of axles is connected by driving rods or gears. Compare with "D" below.
B′B′
Two bogies or wheel assemblies under the unit. Each bogie has two powered axles, connected by driving rods or gears.
Bo′(A1A)
Two bogies or wheel assemblies. The "Bo′" bogie is under one end of the unit, and has two powered axles, while the "(A1A)" bogie under the other end of the unit has one powered axle, one idle axle, and another powered axle. All powered axles are individually driven by traction motors.
Bo′Bo′
Two bogies or wheel assemblies under the unit. Each bogie has two powered axles individually driven by traction motors. Three-quarters of all modern locomotives (and power cars of self-propelled trains) are configured in either this or the "B′B′" arrangement.
Bo′Bo′Bo′
Three bogies or wheel assemblies under the unit. Each bogie has two powered axles individually driven by traction motors. See also: Bo-Bo-Bo .
C
Three powered axles, connected by driving rods or gears, all mounted in the locomotive's frame (Whyte notation: 0-6-0).
C′C′
Two bogies or wheel assemblies under the unit. Each bogie has three powered axles, connected by driving rods or gears. One such example of this type is Southern Pacific 9010.
Co′Co′
Two bogies or wheel assemblies under the unit. Each bogie has three powered axles individually driven by traction motors. See also: Co-Co .
(2Co)(Co2)
A locomotive with two bogies, each with two leading axles and three individually powered axles. A number of Japanese electric locomotives used this wheel arrangement, including the JNR Class EF58, and the PRR GG1.
D
Four powered axles, connected by driving rods or gears, all mounted in the locomotive's frame (Whyte notation: 0-8-0).
1′D1′
One leading idle (non-driven) axle mounted in a bogie, four driven axles mounted in the frame and connected by driving rods or gears, followed by one trailing idle axle mounted in a bogie (Whyte notation: 2-8-2).
E
Five powered axles, mounted in the locomotive's frame (Whyte notation: 0-10-0).
2′D1′h3S
Two front leading axles grouped in a bogie, four driving axles, one trailing axle in a bogie, simple steam expansion, superheated steam, three-cylinders, for fast trains (Whyte notation: 4-8-2).
1′E1′h2Gt
One front leading axle in a bogie, five driving axles, one rear trailing axle, simple steam expansion, superheated steam, two-cylinder machine, for freight trains, tank engine (Whyte notation: 2-10-2T).
1′Dn4vP
One front leading axle in a bogie, four driving axles, saturated steam, four-cylinder machine, compound (double steam expansion), for passenger trains (Whyte notation: 2-8-0).
D′Dh4vtG
No front leading axle, four driving axles in a bogie, four more driven axles mounted in the frame (Mallet locomotive), superheated steam, four-cylinder machine, compound (double steam expansion), tank locomotive, for freight trains (Whyte notation: 0-8-8-0T).

United Kingdom

Standard practice in the United Kingdom was to use the Whyte notation for steam locomotives. During World War 2, the Southern Railway used a system modified from the UIC method: Oliver Bulleid, the Chief Mechanical Engineer, numbered the first nineteen of his 4-6-2 Merchant Navy class Pacifics 21C1 to 21C19, and the first seventy of his 4-6-2 West Country and Battle of Britain class Light Pacifics 21C101 to 21C170, referring to leading axles, trailing axles and powered axles (cf. UIC classification 2′C1′, Whyte 4-6-2). Also, all forty of Bulleid's "Austerity" 0-6-0 Q1 class were similarly numbered C1 to C40, and his two electric locomotives (later British Rail Class 70) were numbered CC1 and CC2 (UIC classification Co′Co′, Commonwealth Co-Co).

See also

Related Research Articles

Whyte notation locomotive wheel arrangements: leading-driving-trailing

The Whyte notation for classifying steam and some internal combustion locomotives by wheel arrangement was devised by Frederick Methvan Whyte, and came into use in the early twentieth century following a December 1900 editorial in American Engineer and Railroad Journal. The notation counts the number of leading wheels, then the number of driving wheels, and finally the number of trailing wheels, numbers being separated by dashes. Other classification schemes, like UIC classification and the French, Turkish and Swiss systems for steam locomotives, count axles rather than wheels.

0-4-0 Locomotive wheel arrangement

Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-4-0 represents one of the simplest possible types, that with two axles and four coupled wheels, all of which are driven. The wheels on the earliest four-coupled locomotives were connected by a single gear wheel, but from 1825 the wheels were usually connected with coupling rods to form a single driven set.

In rail transport, a wheel arrangement or wheel configuration is a system of classifying the way in which wheels are distributed under a locomotive. Several notations exist to describe the wheel assemblies of a locomotive by type, position, and connections, with the adopted notations varying by country. Within a given country, different notations may also be employed for different kinds of locomotives, such as steam, electric, and diesel powered.

Driving wheel powered wheel of a railway locomotive

On a steam locomotive, a driving wheel is a powered wheel which is driven by the locomotive's pistons. On a conventional, non-articulated locomotive, the driving wheels are all coupled together with side rods ; normally one pair is directly driven by the main rod which is connected to the end of the piston rod; power is transmitted to the others through the side rods.

4-2-0 locomotive wheel arrangement

Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 4-2-0 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles, two powered driving wheels on one axle and no trailing wheels. This type of locomotive is often called a Jervis type, the name of the original designer.

The AAR wheel arrangement system is a method of classifying locomotive wheel arrangements that was developed by the Association of American Railroads. It is essentially a simplification of the European UIC classification, and it is widely used in North America to describe diesel and electric locomotives. It is not used for steam locomotives which use the Whyte notation instead.

4-4-4 locomotive wheel arrangement

Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 4-4-4 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles, four powered and coupled driving wheels on two axles, and four trailing wheels on two axles. In the United States, this arrangement was named the Reading type, since the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad was the first to use it. In Canada, this type is known as the Jubilee.

4-2-2 locomotive wheel arrangement

Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 4-2-2 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles, two powered driving wheels on one axle, and two trailing wheels on one axle.

2-4-4T tank locomotive wheel arrangement

In Whyte notation, a 2-4-4, or Boston-type, is a steam locomotive with two unpowered leading wheels followed by four powered driving wheels and four unpowered trailing wheels.

Trailing wheel unpowered locomotive wheel located rear of the driving wheel(s)

On a steam locomotive, a trailing wheel or trailing axle is generally an unpowered wheel or axle (wheelset) located behind the driving wheels. The axle of the trailing wheels is usually located in a trailing truck. On some large locomotives, a booster engine was mounted on the trailing truck to provide extra tractive effort when starting a heavy train and at low speeds on gradients.

Bo-Bo-Bo locomotive wheel arrangement

A Bo-Bo-Bo or Bo′Bo′Bo′ is a locomotive with three independent two-axle bogies with all axles powered by separate traction motors. In the AAR system, this is simplified to B-B-B.

Co-Co locomotives locomotive wheel arrangement

Co-Co is the wheel arrangement for a diesel locomotive with two six-wheeled bogies with all axles powered, with a separate traction motor per axle. The equivalent UIC classification (Europe) for this arrangement is Co′Co′ or C-C for AAR (USA).

B-B and Bo-Bo are the Association of American Railroads (AAR) and British classifications of wheel arrangement for railway locomotives with four axles in two individual bogies. They are equivalent to the B′B′ and Bo′Bo′ classifications in the UIC system. The arrangement of two, two-axled, bogies is a common wheel arrangement for modern electric and diesel locomotives.

The Pennsylvania Railroad's class P5 comprised 92 mixed-traffic electric locomotives constructed 1931–1935 by the PRR, Westinghouse and General Electric. Although the original intention was that they work many passenger trains, the success of the GG1 locomotives meant that the P5 class were mostly used on freight. A single survivor, prototype #4700, is at the Museum of Transportation in St Louis, Missouri.

0-8-4T tank locomotive wheel arrangement

Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-8-4 represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels, eight powered and coupled driving wheels on four axles, and four trailing wheels on two axles.

4-6-2+2-6-4 locomotive wheel arrangement

Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, a 4-6-2+2-6-4 is a Garratt or Union Garratt articulated locomotive using a pair of 4-6-2 engine units back to back, with the boiler and cab suspended between them. The 4-6-2 wheel arrangement of each engine unit has four leading wheels on two axles, usually in a leading bogie, six powered and coupled driving wheels on three axles, and two trailing wheels on one axle, usually in a trailing truck. Since the 4-6-2 type is known as a Pacific, the corresponding Garratt type is usually known as a Double Pacific.

Co-Bo locomotive wheel arrangement

Co-Bo or Co′Bo′ is a wheel arrangement in the UIC classification system for railway locomotives. It features two uncoupled bogies. The "Co" bogie has three driven axles and the "Bo" bogie has two.

Under the French classification system for locomotive wheel arrangements, the system is slightly different for steam and electric/diesel vehicles.

Leading wheel unpowered wheel at the front of a locomotive

The leading wheel or leading axle or pilot wheel of a steam locomotive is an unpowered wheel or axle located in front of the driving wheels. The axle or axles of the leading wheels are normally located on a leading truck. Leading wheels are used to help the locomotive negotiate curves and to support the front portion of the boiler.

Rigid-framed electric locomotive

Rigid-framed electric locomotives were some of the first generations of electric locomotive design. When these began the traction motors of these early locomotives, particularly with AC motors, were too large and heavy to be mounted directly to the axles and so were carried on the frame. One of the initial simplest wheel arrangements for a mainline electric locomotive, from around 1900, was the 1′C1′ arrangement, in UIC classification.

References

  1. The Railway Data File. Leicester: Silverdale, 2000. p. 52. ISBN   1-85605-499-3.
  2. Peck C.B., Locomotive cyclopedia of American practice, 1950-52, Association of American Railroads Mechanical Division, Simmons-Boardman Pub. Co., 1950, p. 449.
  3. Kalla-Bishop P.M. and Luciano Greggio, Steam Locomotives, Crescent, 1985, p. 226.
  4. UIC Leaflet 650. Standard designation of axle arrangement on locomotives and multiple-unit sets. [ Obligatory ]. 5th edition of 1.1.83.
  5. This suffix is dropped in North America because nearly all North American diesels and electrics are this way.