USS Mallard (AM-44)

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Mallard (ASR 4).jpg
History
US flag 48 stars.svgUnited States
Name: USS Mallard
Builder: Staten Island Shipbuilding Co., New York City
Laid down: 25 May 1918
Launched: 17 December 1918
Commissioned: 25 June 1919, as Minesweeper No.44
Decommissioned: 10 December 1946
Reclassified:
  • AM-44, 17 July 1920
  • ASR-4, 12 September 1929
Fate: Sunk as a target, 22 May 1947
General characteristics
Class and type: Lapwing-class minesweeper
Displacement: 950 long tons (965 t)
Length: 187 ft 10 in (57.25 m)
Beam: 35 ft 6 in (10.82 m)
Draft: 9 ft 9 in (2.97 m)
Propulsion:
Speed: 14 knots (26 km/h; 16 mph)
Complement: 85
Armament: 2 × 3"/50 caliber guns

The first USS Mallard (AM-44/ASR-4) was a Lapwing-class minesweeper in the United States Navy. She was later converted to a submarine rescue ship.

Contents

Mallard was laid down by Staten Island Shipbuilding Co., New York City, 25 May 1918; launched 17 December 1918; sponsored by Mrs. Harry R. Brayton, wife of the commanding officer at commissioning; and commissioned 25 June 1919, Lt. (jg.) Harry R. Brayton in command.

Post-World War I Atlantic operations

Assigned to the Atlantic Fleet, Mallard conducted minesweep duties in the 3rd Naval District through the next nine years. Transferred to submarine rescue operations following conversion at Boston Navy Yard June to December 1928, Mallard was redesignated ASR-4 on 12 September 1929. From January to March 1929 she joined submarine S-4 in experimental maneuvers off Key West, Florida.

World War II assignment

The next year Mallard sailed for Coco Solo, her new home port, for patrol off Panama, where she remained throughout World War II attached to Submarine Squadron 3. During that time she performed target towing and diver training services for ships of the fleet.

End-of-War decommissioning

In May 1946 she sailed for the east coast, arriving New York Navy Yard to be decommissioned 10 December and stripped. On 22 May 1947 Mallard was used as a target ship and sunk by torpedo fire from Piper (SS-409).

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