University of Houston System

Last updated
University of Houston System
University of Houston System seal.svg
MottoIn Tempore (Latin)
Motto in English
In Time
Type State university system
Established1977 (1977)
Endowment US$789.7 million [1]
Budget$1.71 billion [2]
Chancellor Renu Khator
Academic staff
5,227 [3]
Administrative staff
4,766 [3]
Students70,027
Location, ,
U.S.

29°43′13″N95°20′37″W / 29.72037°N 95.34374°W / 29.72037; -95.34374 Coordinates: 29°43′13″N95°20′37″W / 29.72037°N 95.34374°W / 29.72037; -95.34374
Colors Scarlet Red and Albino White [4]
         
Website uhsystem.edu
University of Houston System wordmark.png
USA Texas location map.svg
Red pog.svg
UH
Red pog.svg
Red pog.svg
UHD
Red pog.svg
UHV
University of Houston System Locations.

The University of Houston System is a state university system in Texas, comprising four separate and distinct universities. It also owns and holds broadcasting licenses to a public television station (KUHT) and a public radio station (KUHF).

KUHT PBS member station in Houston

KUHT, virtual and VHF digital channel 8, is a Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) member television station licensed to Houston, Texas, United States. Owned by the University of Houston System, it is sister to National Public Radio (NPR) member station KUHF. The two stations share studios and offices in the Melcher Center for Public Broadcasting on the campus of the University of Houston. KUHT's transmitter is located near Missouri City, in unincorporated northeastern Fort Bend County. In addition, the station has leased some of its studio operations to Tegna-owned CBS affiliate KHOU from August 2017 to February 2019 when the latter's original studios were inundated by Hurricane Harvey.

KUHF public radio station in Houston

KUHF is a public radio station serving Greater Houston metropolitan area. It broadcasts on a frequency of 88.7 megahertz on the FM dial. The station is owned by and licensed to the University of Houston System, and is operated by Houston Public Media. KUHF is housed in the Melcher Center for Public Broadcasting—along with KUHT and CBS affiliate KHOU—on the campus of the University of Houston. Local productions include The Engines of Our Ingenuity.

Contents

The fourth-largest university system in Texas, the UH System has more than 70,000 students from the four distinct universities. [3] Its flagship institution is the University of Houston, a comprehensive doctoral degree-granting research university of about 43,000 students. [5] [6] [7] [8] The economic impact of the UH System contributes over $3 billion annually to the Texas economy, while generating about 24,000 jobs. [9] [10]

University of Houston state research university in Houston, Texas, United States

The University of Houston (UH) is a state research university and the main institution of the University of Houston System. Founded in 1927, UH is the third-largest university in Texas with over 46,000 students. Its campus spans 667 acres in southeast Houston, and was known as University of Houston–University Park from 1983 to 1991. The Carnegie Foundation classifies UH as a doctoral degree-granting institution with "highest research activity." The U.S. News & World Report ranks the university No. 171 in its National University Rankings, and No. 91 among top public universities.

The administration is housed in the Ezekiel W. Cullen Building, located on the campus of the University of Houston. The chancellor of the UH System is Renu Khator, who serves concurrently as president of the University of Houston. The System is governed by nine voting-member board of regents, appointed by the Governor of Texas.

Ezekiel W. Cullen Building building in Texas, United States

The Ezekiel W. Cullen Building, usually shortened in pronunciation as the E. Cullen Building, is a building that serves as the administrative headquarters of the University of Houston and the University of Houston System. It is named in honor of Ezekiel Wimberly Cullen, a former congressman of the Republic of Texas, and grandfather of building financier Hugh Roy Cullen. The building was designed by Texas architect Alfred C. Finn in the Art Deco style, and opened in 1950.

Renu Khator Indian-American academic

Renu Khator is the eighth chancellor of the University of Houston System and the thirteenth president of the University of Houston. She is the first foreign-born president of the university, and the second woman to hold the position. Khator is also the first Indian American to lead a major research university in the United States.

Component institutions

The University of Houston System has four separate and distinct institutions; each institution is a stand-alone university and confers its own degrees. Its flagship institution is the University of Houston. The three other institutions in the System are stand-alone universities; they are not branch campuses of the University of Houston.

Admission into each institution is separate, and each institution has distinct admission criteria and requirements.

InstitutionFoundedEnrollmentCampus
Acreage
Freshman
Admission
Rate
[11]
Endowment
Research
Expenditures
Carnegie
Classification
[12]
U.S. News
Ranking
University of Houston 192742,70866759.7%$700.1 million [13] $132 million [13] Doctoral:
Highest Research (R1)
National Universities
No. 194 [14]
University of Houston–Clear Lake 19718,91152457.3%$22.6 million [15] $2.2 million [15] Master's: Large (M1) Regional Universities
No. 74 (West) [16]
University of Houston–Downtown 197414,2562084.0%$34.7 million [17] $1.5 million [17] Master's: Small (M3)Regional Universities
Tier 2 [18]
University of Houston–Victoria 19714,1522090.4%$15.2 million [19] $1.2 million [19] Master's: Large (M1)Regional Universities
Tier 2 [20]

History

Philip G. Hoffman, first chancellor of UH System Philip G. Hoffman.jpg
Philip G. Hoffman, first chancellor of UH System

The University of Houston, founded in 1927, entered the state system of higher education in 1963. The evolvement of a multi-institution University of Houston System came from a recommendation in May 1968 which called for the creation of a university near NASA's Manned Spacecraft Center to offer upper-division and graduate-level programs. [21] By 1971, the 62nd Texas Legislature passed House Bill 199 authorizing the establishment of the University of Houston at Clear Lake City as a separate and distinct institution with the organization and control vested in the Board of Regents of the University of Houston. [22] [23]

NASA space-related agency of the United States government

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is an independent agency of the United States Federal Government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research.

Recognizing the need for a university presence in Downtown Houston, the board of regents acquired the assets of South Texas Junior College on August 6, 1974 and opened the University of Houston–Downtown College (UH/DC) as a four-year institution under the organization and control of the University of Houston. By August 1979, it became a stand-alone university when the 66th Texas Legislature established UH/DC as a separate and distinct institution in the University of Houston System. [24] [25]

The University of Houston System was created by statute on August 29, 1977, under House Bill 188 during the 65th Texas Legislature. [26] [27] The Board of Regents of the University of Houston was renamed the Board of Regents of the University of Houston System. Philip G. Hoffman became the first chancellor of the System, after serving as president of the University of Houston from 1961 to 1977.

During the 68th Texas Legislature, Senate Bill 235 (SB 235) was signed into law and became effective immediately on April 26, 1983. The bill statutorily established the University of Houston–Victoria as a separate and distinct institution in the University of Houston System, and allowed the university system to acquire and dispose of land or other real property outside of Harris County. In addition, SB 235 changed the names of existing UH System institutions as follows:

University of Houston was renamed University of Houston–University Park;
University of Houston at Clear Lake City was renamed University of Houston–Clear Lake; and
University of Houston–Downtown College was renamed University of Houston–Downtown. [28] [29]
Arthur K. Smith, sixth chancellor of UH System AKS2.jpg
Arthur K. Smith, sixth chancellor of UH System

A proposal to reorganize and consolidate state university systems emerged in 1986. The UH System would have been merged into a new university system to include a total of 10 institutions under the recommended reorganization referred to as the "Gulf Coast System." [30] The proposed consolidation grouping drew oppositions from affected institutions, and the plan never materialized. [30]

In 1991, the University of Houston–University Park reverted to its original name: University of Houston. [28] [31] The addition of the "University Park" appellation was done with little discussion and had never gained community acceptance. [32]

In 1997, the administrations of the UH System and the University of Houston were combined under a single chief executive officer, with the dual title of Chancellor of the UH System and President of the University of Houston. Arthur K. Smith became the first person to have held the combined position.

In November 2007, Renu Khator was selected as the eighth chancellor of the University of Houston System and thirteenth president of the University of Houston. Khator became the first female to hold the chancellorship position, and took office in January 2008. She is the third person to hold the dual role of UH System chancellor and UH president.

On November 16, 2011, the University of Houston System announced that the University of Houston as an institution would replace the university system as the administrative entity for the University of Houston System at Sugar Land. With this action, the campus was renamed the "University of Houston Sugar Land" in January 2012. [33]

Organizational structure

Governance

The governance, control, jurisdiction, organization, and management of the University of Houston System is vested in its board of regents. [34] The board has all the rights, powers, and duties that it has with respect to the organization and control of the four component institutions in the System; however, each component institution is maintained as a separate and distinct university.

The Board consists of a chair, vice-chair, secretary, and seven other members including one student who serves a one-year term as regent. Every two years, the Governor of Texas, subject to the confirmation of the Texas Senate, appoints three members to the board of regents. Every member except for the student regent serves a six-year term. Responsibilities for members are specifically listed in the bylaws of the board of regents.

The chairman of the board of regents is Tilman J. Fertitta, CEO of Landry's, Inc. [35] Fertitta attended the University of Houston, and was a student in the Hilton College. He was appointed to the board in 2009, and will serve through August 31, 2021—having been reappointed for an additional six-year term.

Renu Khator, chancellor of University of Houston System Renu Khator (cropped).jpg
Renu Khator, chancellor of University of Houston System

Administration

The chancellor is the chief executive officer of the University of Houston System. The chancellor, appointed by the System's board of regents, has certain authorities that are specified in the regent bylaws. [36] The chancellor has the option to delegate responsibilities to others such as the vice-chancellor, university presidents, and university athletic directors. Such delegations are subject to the board of regents bylaws and UH System policies.

Since 1997, the UH System chancellor has been serving concurrently as the President of the University of Houston. Thus, the chancellor holds a dual role. As of January 2008, Renu Khator has been the chancellor of UH System and president of the University of Houston. The administration of the System is located in the Ezekiel W. Cullen Building on the campus of the University of Houston.

The Chancellor's official residence is known as the "Wortham House." [37] The house was designed by Alfred C. Finn, and built by Frank P. Sterling in 1925 as the "Sterling House." In 1948, the house was donated to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and later sold to Gus and Lyndall Wortham in 1951. Upon her death in July 1980, Lyndall Wortham donated the property to the University of Houston. The house, located in the Houston neighborhood of Southampton, serves as a facility for small functions or gatherings of the UH System. [38]

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