Walk Safely to School Day

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Walk Safely to School Day is an annual, national event in Australia in which primary school children are encouraged to walk or commute safely to school, an initiative of the Pedestrian Council of Australia. It is held annually in May on a varying date.

Originally only held in New South Wales from 1999 to 2003, the event began nationally on 2 April 2004.

The event is sponsored by the Department of Health and Ageing, and is supported by all state, territory and local governments, the Heart Foundation, the Cancer Council, Planet Ark, Diabetes Australia, Beyond Blue, and the Australian Conservation Foundation.

The 2017 date was 19 May. [1]

See also

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References

  1. "Walk Safely to School Day 2020". walk.com.au. Retrieved 22 October 2020.