Nordic walking

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Nordic walking group from a range of different backgrounds Nordic walking by group of people from all ethnics, gender and age from different parts of the world.jpg
Nordic walking group from a range of different backgrounds

Nordic walking is a Finnish-origin total-body version of walking that can be enjoyed both by non-athletes as a health-promoting physical activity, and by athletes as a sport. The activity is performed with specially designed walking poles similar to ski poles.

Contents

History

Nordic walking (originally Finnish sauvakävely) is fitness walking with specially designed poles. While trekkers, backpackers and skiers had been using the basic concept for decades, Nordic walking was first formally defined with the publication of "Hiihdon lajiosa" (translation: "A part of cross-country skiing training methodic") by Mauri Repo in 1979. [1] Nordic walking's concept was developed on the basis of off-season ski-training activity while using one-piece ski poles. [2]

A Nordic walking group Nordic Walking is enjoyed by all.jpg
A Nordic walking group

For decades hikers and backpackers used their one-piece ski poles long before trekking and Nordic walking poles came onto the scene. Ski racers deprived of snow have always used and still do use their one-piece ski poles for ski walking and hill bounding. The first poles specially designed and marketed to fitness walkers were produced by Exerstrider of the US in 1988. Nordic Walker poles were produced and marketed by Exel in 1997. Exel coined and popularized the term 'Nordic Walking' in 1999.

Benefits

Compared to regular walking, Nordic walking (also called pole walking) involves applying force to the poles with each stride. Nordic walkers use more of their entire body (with greater intensity) and receive fitness building stimulation not present in normal walking for the chest, latissimus dorsi muscle, triceps, biceps, shoulder, abdominals, spinal and other core muscles that may result in significant increases in heart rate at a given pace. [3] Nordic walking has been estimated as producing up to a 46% increase in energy consumption, compared to walking without poles. [4] [5]

According to the findings of the research, conducted by the group scientists from various universities*, both Nordic walking and conventional walking are beneficial for older adults. However, Nordic walking provides additional benefits in muscular strength compared to conventional walking, making it suitable for improving aerobic capacity and muscular strength as well as other components of functional fitness in a short period of time. The key points stated by the study authors are:

National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Kanoya, Kanoya, Japan; Department of Rehabilitation, Yonaha General Hospital, Kuwana, Mie, Japan; Wichita State University, Wichita, KS, USA; Active Aging Association, Nagoya, Japan; Nagoya City University, Nagoya, Japan. 2013

Equipment

The handle of a walking pole Rukoiat' i temliak palok dlia skandinavskoi khod'by.jpg
The handle of a walking pole
Spike for offroad and rubber for asphalt Push and Pull.jpg
Spike for offroad and rubber for asphalt

Nordic walking poles are significantly shorter than those recommended for cross-country skiing. Nordic walking poles come in one-piece, non-adjustable shaft versions, available in varying lengths, and telescoping two or three piece twist-locking versions of adjustable length. One piece poles are generally stronger and lighter, but must be matched to the user. Telescoping poles are 'one-size fits all', and are more transportable.

Nordic walking poles feature a range of grips and wrist-straps, or rarely, no wrist-strap at all. The straps eliminate the need to tightly grasp the grips. As with many trekking poles, Nordic walking poles come with removable rubber tips for use on hard surfaces and hardened metal tips for trails, the beach, snow and ice. Most poles are made from lightweight aluminium, carbon fiber, or composite materials. Special walking shoes are not required, although there are shoes being marketed as specifically designed for the sport.

Technique

The cadences of the arms, legs and body are, rhythmically speaking, similar to those used in normal, vigorous, walking. The range of arm movement regulates the length of the stride. Restricted arm movements will mean a natural restricted pelvic motion and stride length. The longer the pole thrust, the longer the stride and more powerful the swing of the pelvis and upper torso.

Country members

See also

Related Research Articles

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Skiing Recreational activity and sport using skis

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Hiking Walking as a hobby, sport, or leisure activity

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Ski binding

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Ski pole

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Roller skiing

Roller skiing is an off-snow equivalent to cross-country skiing. Roller skis have wheels on their ends and are used on a hard surface, to emulate cross-country skiing. The skiing techniques used are very similar to techniques used in cross-country skiing on snow.

Walking stick

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References

  1. "KOULUTUSAINEISTOA MAURI REPO : SEURAVALMENTAJAN PERUSTIEDOT HIIHDON LAJIOSA" (PDF). Tul.fi. Archived from the original (PDF) on 1 January 2014. Retrieved 28 December 2017.
  2. "The History of Nordic Walking". Inwa-nordic-walking.com. 29 May 2014. Retrieved 28 December 2017.
  3. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise VOL. 27, NO. 4 April1995:607–11
  4. Cooper Institute, Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sports, 2002
  5. Church, TS; Earnest, CP; Morss, GM (25 March 2013). "Field testing of physiological responses associated with Nordic Walking". Res Q Exerc Sport. 73 (3): 296–300. doi:10.1080/02701367.2002.10609023. PMID   12230336.
  6. "Nordic Walking in Kharkov, Nordic walking club". LET'S GO!. Retrieved 10 December 2020.