Ware's Tavern

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Ware's Tavern
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Location Sherborn, Massachusetts
Coordinates 42°13′39″N71°21′58″W / 42.22750°N 71.36611°W / 42.22750; -71.36611 Coordinates: 42°13′39″N71°21′58″W / 42.22750°N 71.36611°W / 42.22750; -71.36611
Built 1780
Architect Unknown
Architectural style Greek Revival, Federal
MPS Sherborn MRA
NRHP reference #

86000512

[1]
Added to NRHP January 3, 1986

Ware's Tavern is a historic tavern (now a private residence) at 113 S. Main Street in Sherborn, Massachusetts. The two story wood frame structure was built c. 1780 by Benjamin Ware as a house for his family. It has a centered entry that is now sheltered by a Colonial Revival (early 20th century) surround. Ware's son Eleazer converted the building into a tavern; it was greatly enlarged with an ell to the rear c. 1840. The building ceased to be used as a tavern by 1889; an ell was removed sometime in the 19th century, and now stands at 109 S. Main Street. [2]

Sherborn, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Sherborn is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. It is in area code 508 and has the ZIP code 01770. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, the town population was 4,119.

The tavern was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

See also

This is a list of properties and historic districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Sherborn, Massachusetts.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "NRHP nomination for Ware's Tavern". Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved 2014-05-09.