Watson Lake Cone

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Watson Lake Cone is a cinder cone in southern Yukon, Canada, located near the British Columbia-Yukon border. It formed and last erupted during the Pleistocene period and is part of the Northern Cordilleran Volcanic Province. [1]

Cinder cone A steep conical hill of loose pyroclastic fragments around a volcanic vent

A cinder cone or scoria cone is a steep conical hill of loose pyroclastic fragments, such as either volcanic clinkers, volcanic ash, or cinder that has been built around a volcanic vent. The pyroclastic fragments are formed by explosive eruptions or lava fountains from a single, typically cylindrical, vent. As the gas-charged lava is blown violently into the air, it breaks into small fragments that solidify and fall as either cinders, clinkers, or scoria around the vent to form a cone that often is symmetrical; with slopes between 30–40°; and a nearly circular ground plan. Most cinder cones have a bowl-shaped crater at the summit.

Yukon Territory of Canada

Yukon is the smallest and westernmost of Canada's three federal territories. It has the smallest population of any province or territory in Canada, with 35,874 people, although it has the largest city in any of the three territories. Whitehorse is the territorial capital and Yukon's only city.

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Canada's southern border with the United States, stretching some 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest bi-national land border. Its capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. As a whole, Canada is sparsely populated, the majority of its land area being dominated by forest and tundra. Consequently, its population is highly urbanized, with over 80 percent of its inhabitants concentrated in large and medium-sized cities, with 70% of citizens residing within 100 kilometres (62 mi) of the southern border. Canada's climate varies widely across its vast area, ranging from arctic weather in the north, to hot summers in the southern regions, with four distinct seasons.

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Alligator Lake volcanic complex mountain

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Atlin Volcanic Field mountain range

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Volcano Mountain mountain in Canada

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Toozaza Peak is a tuya in the Stikine Ranges of the Cassiar Mountains in northern British Columbia, Canada, located in the Iverson Creek. Toozaza Peak is the summit of a north-south aligned ridge between the head of Toozaza Creek and the head of the Jennings River, just south of the Jennings' divide with the Little Rancheria River headwaters. The Little Rancheria and Toozaza Creek are part of the Liard, while the Jennings is part of the Yukon River drainage via Teslin Lake, and the peak therefore stands astride the line of the Continental Divide. It is part of the Tuya Volcanic Field, a volcanic field associated with the Stikine Volcanic Belt, part of the Northern Cordilleran Volcanic Province.

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Ne Ch'e Ddhawa is a volcano located 7 km (4.3 mi) upstream from Fort Selkirk in the Fort Selkirk Volcanic Field of central Yukon, Canada. It has been described as a cinder cone or a subglacial mound. The volcano erupted subglacially during the late Pleistocene, erupting hyaloclastite tuffs, breccias, and pillow breccias.

Outcast Hill is an isolated hill in northern British Columbia, Canada, located southeast of Mess Lake. It lies at the southern end of Mount Edziza Provincial Park.

Snowshoe Lava Field

The Snowshoe Lava Field is a volcanic field associated with the Mount Edziza volcanic complex in northern British Columbia, Canada. It is on the southern end of the Big Raven Plateau and is an area of young lava flows.

Twin Cone is a cinder cone in northern British Columbia, Canada. It is thought to have last erupted in the Holocene period.

Second Canyon Cone, also called Canyon Creek Cone is a cinder cone in the Boundary Ranges of the Coast Mountains in northwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is a volcanic feature of the Iskut-Unuk River Cones which is part of the Northern Cordilleran Volcanic Province and formed in the past 10,000 years of the Holocene epoch.

Exile Hill is an isolated hill in the Spectrum Range of northern British Columbia, Canada, located southeast of Mess Lake. It lies at the southern end of Mount Edziza Provincial Park.

Fort Selkirk Vent is a geological name for a cinder cone in central Yukon, Canada, located just east of Fort Selkirk along the Yukon River.

Mess Lake Cone is a cinder cone in northwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is polygenetic in nature, having erupted more than once throughout its eruptive history. Mess Lake Cone is one of the volcanoes that produced young basaltic lava flows in the central portion of the Mount Edziza volcanic complex in the past 10,000 years. These basaltic lava flows form a north-south trending volcanic field called the Mess Lake Lava Field.

Cone Glacier Volcano is a cinder cone in the Boundary Ranges of the Coast Mountains in northwestern British Columbia, Canada. It is part of the Iskut-Unuk River Cones group and last erupted during the Holocene period. Cone Glacier contains two arms that surround the volcano.

Volcanic history of the Northern Cordilleran Volcanic Province

The volcanic history of the Northern Cordilleran Volcanic Province presents a record of volcanic activity in northwestern British Columbia, central Yukon and the U.S. state of easternmost Alaska. The volcanic activity lies in the northern part of the Western Cordillera of the Pacific Northwest region of North America. Extensional cracking of the North American Plate in this part of North America has existed for millions of years. Continuation of this continental rifting has fed scores of volcanoes throughout the Northern Cordilleran Volcanic Province over at least the past 20 million years and occasionally continued into geologically recent times.

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