Wayne's World (film)

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Wayne's World
Waynes world ver2.jpg
Theatrical poster
Directed by Penelope Spheeris
Produced by Lorne Michaels
Screenplay by
Based on Wayne's World
by Mike Myers
Starring
Music by J. Peter Robinson
Cinematography Theo van de Sande
Edited byMalcolm Campbell
Production
company
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release date
  • February 14, 1992 (1992-02-14)
Running time
95 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$20 million
Box office$183.1 million [1]

Wayne's World is a 1992 American comedy film directed by Penelope Spheeris, produced by Lorne Michaels, and written by Mike Myers, and Bonnie and Terry Turner. It stars Myers in his feature film debut as Wayne Campbell and Dana Carvey as Garth Algar, a pair of rock fans who broadcast a public-access television show. It also features Rob Lowe, Tia Carrere, Lara Flynn Boyle, Brian Doyle-Murray, Chris Farley, Ed O'Neill, Ione Skye, Meat Loaf, and Alice Cooper.

Comedy is a genre of film in which the main emphasis is on humour. These films are designed to make the audience laugh through amusement and most often work by exaggerating characteristics for humorous effect. Films in this style traditionally have a happy ending. One of the oldest genres in film, some of the very first silent movies were comedies, as slapstick comedy often relies on visual depictions, without requiring sound. When sound films became more prevalent during the 1920s, comedy films took another swing, as laughter could result from burlesque situations but also dialogue.

Penelope Spheeris filmmaker

Penelope Spheeris is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. She has directed both documentary film and scripted films. Her best known works include the trilogy titled The Decline of Western Civilization, each covering an aspect of Los Angeles underground culture, and Wayne's World, her highest-grossing film.

Lorne Michaels Canadian television producer

Lorne Michaels,, is a Canadian-American television producer, writer, actor and comedian best known for creating and producing Saturday Night Live and producing the Late Night series, The Kids in the Hall and The Tonight Show.

Contents

Wayne's World was released in the US on February 14, 1992. A critical and commercial success, it was the eighth-highest-grossing film of 1992 and it remains the highest-grossing film based on Saturday Night Live skits. A sequel, Wayne's World 2 , was released on December 10, 1993.

<i>Waynes World 2</i> 1993 film by Stephen Surjik

Wayne's World 2 is a 1993 American comedy film directed by Stephen Surjik and starring Mike Myers and Dana Carvey as hosts of a public-access television cable television show in Aurora, Illinois. The film is the sequel to Wayne's World (1992), which was adapted from a sketch on NBC's Saturday Night Live.

Plot

In Aurora, Illinois, rock fans Wayne Campbell and Garth Algar host a public-access television show, Wayne's World, from Wayne's parents' basement. After they sell the rights to the show to television producer Benjamin Oliver for $10,000, they celebrate at a night club, where they avoid Wayne's troubled ex-girlfriend Stacy. Wayne falls for Cassandra Wong, vocalist and bassist of the band performing that night, Crucial Taunt, and impresses her with his Cantonese. He purchases a 1964 Fender Stratocaster electric guitar he has long coveted.

Aurora, Illinois City in Illinois, United States

Aurora, a suburb of Chicago, is a city in DuPage, Kane, Kendall, and Will counties in the U.S. state of Illinois. Located primarily in DuPage and Kane counties, it is an outer suburb of Chicago and the second most populous city in the state, and the 115th most populous city in the country. The population was 197,899 at the 2010 census, and was estimated to have increased to 200,965 by 2017.

Public-access television is traditionally a form of non-commercial mass media where the general public can create content television programming which is narrowcast through cable TV specialty channels. Public-access television was created in the United States between 1969 and 1971 by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), under Chairman Dean Burch, based on pioneering work and advocacy of George Stoney, Red Burns, and Sidney Dean.

Cantonese standard dialect of Yue language that originated in the vicinity of Guangzhou (Canton) in southern China

Cantonese is a variety of Chinese originating from the city of Guangzhou and its surrounding area in Southeastern China. It is the traditional prestige variety of the Yue Chinese dialect group, which has about 68 million native speakers. While the term Cantonese specifically refers to the prestige variety, it is often used to refer to the entire Yue subgroup of Chinese, including related but largely mutually unintelligible languages and dialects such as Taishanese.

Benjamin attempts to steal Cassandra from Wayne by using his wealth and good looks. He distracts Wayne and Garth with all-access tickets to an Alice Cooper concert in Milwaukee, while offering to produce a music video for Crucial Taunt. At the concert, Wayne and Garth make the acquaintance of a bodyguard to music producer Frankie Sharp, head of Sharp Records.

Alice Cooper American rock singer, songwriter and musician

Alice Cooper is an American singer, songwriter, and actor whose career spans over 50 years. With his distinctive raspy voice and a stage show that features guillotines, electric chairs, fake blood, deadly snakes, baby dolls, and dueling swords, Cooper is considered by music journalists and peers alike to be "The Godfather of Shock Rock". He has drawn equally from horror films, vaudeville, and garage rock to pioneer a macabre and theatrical brand of rock designed to shock people.

A music video is a short film that integrates a song with imagery, and is produced for promotional or artistic purposes. Modern music videos are primarily made and used as a marketing device intended to promote the sale of music recordings. There are also cases where songs are used in tie-in marketing campaigns that allow them to become more than just a song. Tie-ins and merchandising can be used for toys or for food or other products. Although the origins of the music video date back to musical short films that first appeared in the 1920s, they again came into prominence in the 1980s when the channel MTV based their format around the medium. Prior to the 1980s, these kinds of videos were described by various terms including "illustrated song", "filmed insert", "promotional (promo) film", "promotional clip", "promotional video", "song video", "song clip" or "film clip".

While filming the revamped Wayne's World under Benjamin's oversight, Wayne and Garth find it difficult to adjust to the professional studio environment. Their contract obliges them to give a promotional interview to their sponsor, Noah Vanderhoff, who owns a franchise of amusement arcades. After Wayne publicly ridicules Vanderhoff, he is fired from the show, causing a rift in his friendship with Garth. Jealous of the attention Benjamin is giving Cassandra, Wayne attempts to prevent her from participating in the Crucial Taunt music video shoot. She breaks up with him, furious at his lack of trust.

Sponsor (commercial) commercial supporter of an event, activity, or person

Sponsoring something is the act of supporting an event, activity, person, or organization financially or through the provision of products or services. The individual or group that provides the support, similar to a benefactor, is known as sponsor.

Amusement arcade a place to play video games and other coin operated games

An amusement arcade is a venue where people play arcade games such as video games, pinball machines, electro-mechanical games, redemption games, merchandisers, or coin-operated billiards or air hockey tables. In some countries, some types of arcades are also legally permitted to provide gambling machines such as slot machines or pachinko machines. Games are usually housed in cabinets. The term used for ancestors of these venues in the beginning of the 20th century was penny arcades.

Wayne and Garth reunite and hatch a plan to win Cassandra back by having Sharp hear Crucial Taunt play. While Garth and their friends infiltrate a satellite station with the aid of Benjamin's assistant, Wayne goes to Cassandra's video shoot, but embarrasses himself in an attempt to expose Benjamin's ulterior motive. As he leaves, Cassandra changes her mind about Benjamin. Wayne apologizes and they return to Aurora.

The Wayne's World crew hacks into Sharp's satellite television and broadcast the Crucial Taunt performance from Wayne's basement, where Sharp and Benjamin converge. Sharp declines to offer Crucial Taunt a record contract, Cassandra breaks up with Wayne and departs with Benjamin for a tropical resort, Stacy reveals that she is pregnant with Wayne's child, and a fire destroys Wayne's house.

Dissatisfied, Wayne and Garth turn to the film's audience and halt proceedings. They restart the scene and unmask Benjamin as "Old Man Withers" in a Scooby-Doo parody ending. Still unsatisfied, they start again with a "mega happy ending" in which Cassandra signs a record contract and reunites with Wayne, Garth begins a relationship with a waitress, and Benjamin learns that money and good looks do not necessarily bring happiness.

<i>Scooby-Doo</i> American animated cartoon franchise

Scooby-Doo is an American animated franchise, comprising many animated television series produced from 1969 to the present day. Writers Joe Ruby and Ken Spears created the original series, Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!, for Hanna-Barbera Productions in 1969. This Saturday-morning cartoon series featured four teenagers—Fred Jones, Daphne Blake, Velma Dinkley, and Norville "Shaggy" Rogers—and their talking brown Great Dane named Scooby-Doo, who solve mysteries involving supposedly supernatural creatures through a series of antics and missteps.

Cast

Production

Wayne's World was greenlit by Paramount Pictures in 1991. It was the second film based on a Saturday Night Live sketch following The Blues Brothers in 1980. [3] Producer Lorne Michaels hired Penelope Spheeris to direct, who had directed several music documentaries. Spheeris said, "I had been just struggling as a female director in this business for many years. I was 45 years old when I got that job. I just kept hanging in there. And Wayne's World happened, and it sort of flipped my life around." [4]

Spheeris clashed with Myers during filming. She told Entertainment Weekly that Myers was "emotionally needy and got more difficult as the shoot went along. You should have heard him bitching when I was trying to do that ' Bohemian Rhapsody ' scene: 'I can't move my neck like that! Why do we have to do this so many times? No one is going to laugh at that!'" She said she attempted to assuage Myers by having her daughter provide him snacks, [5] and on one occasion he stormed off the set, upset that there was no margarine for his bagel. [5] Myers and Spheeris argued over the final cut of the film, causing Myers to prevent Spheeris from directing Wayne's World 2 . [6] [7]

Reception

Box office

The movie was a box office success, debuting at number one. [8] [9] The film's final domestic gross was $121,697,323, [10] making it the eighth-highest-grossing film of 1992 [11] and the highest-grossing of the 11 films based on Saturday Night Live skits.

Critical response

On Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an 84% "Certified Fresh" rating based on 50 reviews, with an average rating of 6.77/10, with the critical consensus stating, "An oddball comedy that revels in its silliness and memorable catch phrases, Wayne's World is also fondly regarded because of its endearing characters." [12] On Metacritic, the film has a score of 53 out of 100, based on 13 critics, indicating "mixed or average reviews". [13] Roger Ebert said in his review: "I walked into Wayne's World expecting a lot of dumb, vulgar comedy, and I got plenty, but I also found what I didn't expect: a genuinely amusing, sometimes even intelligent, undercurrent." [14] However, Desson Howe wrote in the Washington Post that making a movie out of such a "teeny sketch" is "better than you'd expect" but criticized the finale as "an attempt to lampoon movie endings" "and a despair-driven inability to end the movie". [15]

Effect on pop culture

Wayne's World AMC Pacer clone at Rusty's TV & Movie Car Museum in Jackson, Tennessee Rusty-s TV and Movie Car Museum Jackson TN 020.jpg
Wayne's World AMC Pacer clone at Rusty's TV & Movie Car Museum in Jackson, Tennessee

Filled with pop culture references, the sketches and the film started catchphrases such as "Schwing!" and "Schyea", as well as popularizing "That's what she said", "Party on!" and the use of "... Not!" after apparently affirmative sentences in order to state the contrary. [16]

Awards

American Film Institute recognition:

Music

See also

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References

  1. "Wayne's World (1992) – Daily Box Office". Box Office Mojo . Retrieved 2016-02-02.
  2. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-01-17. Retrieved 2012-11-03.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. "Mike Myers couldn't drive during 'Wayne's World'". New York Post . 2017-02-02. Retrieved 2017-05-17.
  4. Pirnia, Garin (2017-02-06). "How Wayne's World Made—and Broke—Its Director's Career". Vanity Fair . Retrieved 2017-05-17.
  5. 1 2 "Mike Myers: Man of Mystery". Entertainment Weekly. 2008-06-16. Retrieved 2017-05-17.
  6. Brandon Kirby (April 24, 2013). "Mike Myers, Dana Carvey Set Aside 'Wayne's World' Feud at Academy Screening". The Hollywood Reporter . Retrieved 2015-07-08. Carvey and Spheeris both notoriously fell out with Myers despite the 1992 film's huge success. Myers is said to have blocked Spheeris from directing the 1993 sequel because she'd ignored his edit suggestions on the original.
  7. "How Mike Myers and Dana Carvey Resolved Their 'Wayne's World'-'Austin Powers' Feud". The Hollywood Reporter . April 11, 2013. Retrieved 2015-07-08. Myers blocked Spheeris from directing the 1993 sequel because she'd ignored his edit suggestions on the original (her cut already had tested well). And Carvey felt Myers later stole his Dr. Evil impression for Austin Powers, which supposedly was based on Carvey's goof on Lorne Michaels.
  8. Fox, David J. (1992-03-03). "Weekend Box Office `Wayne's World' Keeps Partyin' On". Los Angeles Times . Retrieved 2010-11-18.
  9. Fox, David J. (1992-03-17). "Weekend Box Office `Wayne's World' Gains in Fifth Week". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2010-10-26.
  10. "Alphabetical Movie Index A-Z". Box Office Mojo . Amazon.com. Retrieved 2011-01-17.
  11. "1992 Yearly Box Office Results - Box Office Mojo". Boxofficemojo.com. Retrieved 20 August 2017.
  12. "Wayne's World". Rottentomatoes.com. Retrieved 2017-08-20.
  13. "Wayne's World Reviews". Metacritic . Retrieved 2016-07-17.
  14. Ebert, Roger. "Wayne's World Movie Review & Film Summary (1992) | Roger Ebert". Rogerebert.com. Retrieved 2017-03-25.
  15. Howe, Desson. "Wayne's World (PG-13)". Washingtonpost.com. Retrieved 2017-03-25.
  16. "Schwing! Mike Myers & Dana Carvey's 'Wayne's World' Reunion Recap". FirstShowing.net. 2013-04-25. Retrieved 2016-07-17.
  17. "This is the American Film Institute's list of 500 movies nominated for the top 100 Funniest American Movies" (PDF). Afi.com. Retrieved 2017-08-20.
  18. 1 2 "ACE VENTURA : All-righty then!" (PDF). Afi.com. Retrieved 2017-08-20.
  19. "AFI's 100 Years... 100 Songs" (PDF). Afi.com. Retrieved 2017-08-20.
  20. "Search results for Wayne's World". riaa.com. Retrieved 8 August 2016.
  21. 1 2 "WTF Podcast with Mark Maron". WTF. 2014-07-28. Retrieved 2014-07-31.
  22. "Mike Myers Almost Walked When 'Wayne's World' Wasn't Going To Use 'Bohemian Rhapsody'". Huffington Post. Retrieved July 22, 2015
  23. "Brian May: 'Wayne's World' "Bohemian Rhapsody" Scene Hit Close to Home". Guitar World. 2016-07-18. Retrieved 2017-06-04.
  24. "The Five Most Culturally Significant Wayne's World Songs". LA Weekly. Retrieved March 17, 2019.
  25. Martin Charles Strong; Brendon Griffin (2008). Lights, camera, sound tracks. Canongate. p. 396. ISBN   978-1-84767-003-8 . Retrieved March 17, 2019.