1927 Norwegian parliamentary election

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1927 Norwegian parliamentary election
Flag of Norway.svg
  1924 17 October 1927 1930  

All 150 seats in the Storting
76 seats needed for a majority
 First partySecond partyThird party
  Torp.PNG Johan Ludwig Mowinckel.jpg 33606 C.J. Hambro.jpg
Leader Oscar Torp Johan Ludwig Mowinckel C. J. Hambro
Party Labour Liberal Conservative
Last election18.44%, 24 seats18.58%, 34 seats32.53%, 43 seats
Seats won593029
Seat changeIncrease2.svg35Decrease2.svg4Decrease2.svg14
Popular vote368,106172,568240,091 (H+FV)
Percentage36.84%17.27%24.03% (H+FV)

 Fourth partyFifth partySixth party
  Peder Furubotn ca1920.jpg
Leader Erik Enge Peder Furubotn P. A. Holm
Party Farmers' Communist Free-minded
Last election13.52%, 22 seats6.10%, 6 seats11 seats with H
Seats won2632
Seat changeIncrease2.svg4Decrease2.svg3Decrease2.svg9
Popular vote149,02640,075With H
Percentage14.91%4.01%

Prime Minister before election

Ivar Lykke
Conservative

Prime Minister after election

Ivar Lykke
Conservative

Parliamentary elections were held in Norway on 17 October 1927. [1] [2] The Labour Party emergeed as the largest party, winning 59 of the 150 seats in the Storting. [3] However, the subsequent government was headed by Ivar Lykke of the Conservative Party.

Contents

Results

1927 Storting.svg
PartyVotes%Seats+/–
Labour Party 368,10636.8459+35
Conservative Party [lower-alpha 1] 240,09124.0329–14
Free-minded Liberal Party [lower-alpha 1] 1
Liberal Party 172,56817.2730–4
Farmers' Party 149,02614.9126+4
Communist Party 40,0754.013–3
Free-minded Liberal Party [lower-alpha 1] 14,4391.441
Radical People's Party 13,4591.351–1
Other parties1,5180.150
Wild votes150.00
Total999,297100.001500
Valid votes999,29798.88
Invalid/blank votes11,3281.12
Total votes1,010,625100.00
Registered voters/turnout1,484,40968.08
Source: Nohlen & Stöver

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 The Conservative Party and the Free-minded Liberal Party continued their alliance, but in some constituencies the Free-minded Liberal Party ran separate lists. [4] It won one seat on the joint lists and one seat on a separate list. [5]

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References

  1. Dieter Nohlen & Philip Stöver (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1438 ISBN   978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. Knaplund, Paul (1928). "Norwegian Elections of 1927 and the Labor Government". American Political Science Review. 22 (2): 413–416. doi:10.2307/1945479. ISSN   0003-0554.
  3. Arneson, Ben A. (1931). "Norway Moves Toward the Right". American Political Science Review. 25 (1): 152–157. doi:10.2307/1946579. ISSN   0003-0554.
  4. Nohlen & Stöver, p1450
  5. Nohlen & Stöver, p1458