Prime Minister of Norway

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This is a descriptive article. For a list, see List of heads of government of Norway.
Prime Minister of Norway
Norges statsminister
(Norwegian Bokmål)
Noregs statsminister
( Norwegian Nynorsk)
Coat of arms of Norway.svg
Erna Solberg, Wesenberg, 2011 (1).jpg
Incumbent
Erna Solberg

since 16 October 2013
Style Her Excellency (informal)
Residence Inkognitogata 18
Seat Office of the Prime Minister at:
Regjeringskvartalet (formerly)
Akershus Fortress (temporary) Oslo, Norway
AppointerThe monarch
Term length No term limits.
General elections are held every four years. The prime minister is by convention the leader of the party with majority support in parliament.
Inaugural holder Frederik Stang (generally regarded as the first incumbent)
Formation1873
Website Government official homepage
Coat of arms of Norway.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Norway
Constitution

The Prime Minister of Norway (Norwegian : statsminister, literally the "minister of the state") is the head of government of Norway and the most powerful person in Norwegian politics. The Prime Minister and Cabinet (consisting of all the most senior government department heads) are collectively accountable for their policies and actions to the monarch, to the Storting (Parliament of Norway), to their political party, and ultimately the electorate. In practice, since it is nearly impossible for a government to stay in office against the will of the Storting, the prime minister is primarily answerable to the Storting. He or she is almost always the leader of the majority party in the Storting, or the leader of the senior partner in the governing coalition.

Norwegian language North Germanic language spoken in Norway

Norwegian is a North Germanic language spoken mainly in Norway, where it is the official language. Along with Swedish and Danish, Norwegian forms a dialect continuum of more or less mutually intelligible local and regional varieties, and some Norwegian and Swedish dialects, in particular, are very close. These Scandinavian languages, together with Faroese and Icelandic as well as some extinct languages, constitute the North Germanic languages. Faroese and Icelandic are hardly mutually intelligible with Norwegian in their spoken form because continental Scandinavian has diverged from them. While the two Germanic languages with the greatest numbers of speakers, English and German, have close similarities with Norwegian, neither is mutually intelligible with it. Norwegian is a descendant of Old Norse, the common language of the Germanic peoples living in Scandinavia during the Viking Era.

Head of government is a generic term used for either the highest or second highest official in the executive branch of a sovereign state, a federated state, or a self-governing colony, who often presides over a cabinet, a group of ministers or secretaries who lead executive departments. The term "head of government" is often differentiated from the term "head of state", as they may be separate positions, individuals, or roles depending on the country.

Norway constitutional monarchy in Northern Europe

Norway, officially the Kingdom of Norway, is a Nordic country in Northwestern Europe whose territory comprises the western and northernmost portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula; the remote island of Jan Mayen and the archipelago of Svalbard are also part of the Kingdom of Norway. The Antarctic Peter I Island and the sub-Antarctic Bouvet Island are dependent territories and thus not considered part of the kingdom. Norway also lays claim to a section of Antarctica known as Queen Maud Land.

Contents

Norway has a constitution, which was adopted on 17 May 1814. [1] The position of prime minister is the result of legislation. Modern prime ministers have few statutory powers, but provided they can command the support of their parliamentary party, they can control both the legislature and the executive (the cabinet) and hence wield considerable de facto powers. As of 2019, the Prime Minister of Norway is Erna Solberg, of the Conservative Party.

The Constitution of Norway was first adopted on 16 May and subsequently signed and dated on 17 May 1814 by the Norwegian Constituent Assembly at Eidsvoll. It was at the time considered to be one of the most liberal or radically democratic constitutions in the world, and it is today the second oldest single-document national constitution in Europe after the Constitution of Poland and second oldest in the world still in continuous force after the United States Constitution, as the Polish 3 May Constitution survived for less than 2 years. 17 May is the National Day of Norway.

Erna Solberg Norwegian politician and prime minister

Erna Solberg is a Norwegian politician serving as Prime Minister of Norway since October 2013 and Leader of the Conservative Party since May 2004.

Conservative Party (Norway) Norwegian political party

The Conservative Party is a conservative and liberal-conservative political party in Norway. It is the major party of the Norwegian centre-right, and the leading party in the governing Solberg cabinet. The current party leader is the Prime Minister of Norway Erna Solberg.

Unlike their counterparts in the rest of Europe, Norwegian prime ministers do not have the option of advising the king to dissolve the Storting and call a snap election. The constitution requires that the Storting serve out its full four-year term. If the prime minister loses the confidence of the Storting, he or she must resign.

A snap election is an election called earlier than expected.

Longest-serving prime ministers

Nr.Prime ministerPartyDaysYears, months, days
1. Einar Gerhardsen Labour Party 622617 years and 17 days
2. Johan Nygaardsvold Labour Party 375010 years, 3 months and 5 days
3. Gro Harlem Brundtland Labour Party 369110 years, 1 month and 9 days
4. Jens Stoltenberg Labour Party 35189 years, 7 months and 17 days
5. Gunnar Knudsen Liberal Party 33839 years, 3 months and 4 days
6. Johan Ludwig Mowinckel Liberal Party 25176 years, 10 months and 21 days
7. Kjell Magne Bondevik Christian Democratic Party 23416 years, 4 months and 29 days
8. Johannes Steen Liberal Party 23116 years, 3 months and 30 days
9. Per Borten Centre Party 19825 years, 5 months and 5 days
10. Erna Solberg Conservative Party 19755 years, 4 months and 28 days
11. Odvar Nordli Labour Party 18475 years and 20 days

Living former prime ministers

As of 2018 five former prime ministers are alive:

Kåre Willoch Prime Minister of Norway, in office 1981-1986

Kåre Isaachsen Willoch is a former Norwegian politician from the Conservative Party. He served as Minister of Trade and Shipping in 1963 and 1965–1970, as President of the Nordic Council in 1973, and as Prime Minister of Norway from 1981 to 1986. Willoch was Chairman of the Conservative Party 1970–1974.

Gro Harlem Brundtland Norwegian politician

Gro Harlem Brundtland is a Norwegian politician, who served three terms as Prime Minister of Norway and as Director-General of the World Health Organization from 1998 to 2003. She is also known for having chaired the Brundtland Commission which presented the Brundtland Report on sustainable development.

Kjell Magne Bondevik Norwegian politician

Kjell Magne Bondevik is a Norwegian Lutheran minister and politician. He served as Prime Minister of Norway from 1997 to 2000, and from 2001 to 2005, making him Norway's longest serving non-Labour Party Prime Minister since World War II. Currently, he is President of the Oslo Centre for Peace and Human Rights.

See also

Regjeringskvartalet area in Oslo, Norway, for the governments administrative offices

Regjeringskvartalet is a collection of buildings located in the centre of Norway's capital city Oslo, housing several offices for the Norwegian Government. The complex is situated approximately 350 yards northeast of the Parliament Building, and consists of nine buildings with about 1,960,000 sq f (182,000 m²) of office space employing approximately 4,430 people.

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References

  1. "NORWAY'S STRUGGLE WITH HER KING" (PDF). The New York Times . 11 November 1882. Retrieved 3 February 2009.