Prime Minister of Jamaica

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Prime Minister of Jamaica
Coat of arms of Jamaica.svg
Flag of the Prime Minister of Jamaica.svg
Standard of the Prime Minister of Jamaica
Andrew Holness Press (cropped).jpg
Incumbent
Andrew Holness
since 3 March 2016
Style The Most Honourable
Member of Cabinet
Residence Vale Royal (Jamaica)
Appointer Governor-General
Term length no term limits
5 years
Formation6 August 1962
First holder Sir William Bustamante
as Chief Minister of Jamaica
Deputy Deputy Prime Minister
Salary$JMD 7,271,283 apx* annually [1]
Website www.opm.jm

The prime minister of Jamaica is Jamaica's head of government, currently Andrew Holness. Holness, as leader of the governing Jamaica Labour Party (JLP), was sworn in as prime minister on 7 September 2020, having been re-elected as a result of the JLP's landslide victory in the 2020 Jamaican general election. [2]

Contents

The prime minister is formally appointed into office by the governor general, who represents King Charles III.

Official residence and office

Front Lawns of Vale Royal Valeroyal.jpg
Front Lawns of Vale Royal

The prime minister of Jamaica's official residence is Vale Royal. The property was constructed in 1694 by the planter Sir William Taylor, who was one of the richest men in Jamaica at the time. In 1928 the property was sold to the government and became the official residence of the British colonial secretary (then Sir Reginald Edward Stubbs). Vale Royal has subsequently become the official residence of the prime minister. [3] Vale Royal is not open to the public.

Jamaica House has been the location of the Office of the Prime Minister since 1972. [4] Prime Ministers resided there from 1964 until 1980. [4] On 8 November 2022, Prime Minister Andrew Holness said in question time that his official residence was Jamaica House rather than Vale Royal, and that that Vale Royal was currently in disrepair and possible future uses would be considered after its restoration. [5]

Chief ministers of Jamaica (1953–1959)

No.PortraitChief Minister
(Birth–Death)
Term of officePolitical partyElection
Took officeLeft officeTime in office
1
Prime Minister of Jamaica, Sir Alexander Bustamante (04) (cropped).jpg
Sir Alexander Bustamante
(1884–1977)
5 May 19532 February 19551 year, 273 days JLP
2
No image.png
Norman Manley
(1893–1969)
2 February 195514 August 19594 years, 193 days PNP 1955

Premiers of Jamaica (1959–1962)

No.PortraitPremier
(Birth–Death)
Term of officePolitical partyElection
Took officeLeft officeTime in office
1
No image.png
Norman Manley
(1893–1969)
14 August 195929 April 19622 years, 258 days PNP 1959
2
Prime Minister of Jamaica, Sir Alexander Bustamante (04) (cropped).jpg
Sir Alexander Bustamante
(1884–1977)
29 April 19626 August 196299 days JLP 1962

Prime ministers of Jamaica (1962–present)

Key: Died in office

No.PortraitPrime Minister
(Birth–Death)
Term of officePolitical partyElection
Took officeLeft officeTime in office
1
Prime Minister of Jamaica, Sir Alexander Bustamante (04) (cropped).jpg
Sir Alexander Bustamante
(1884–1977)
6 August 196223 February 19674 years, 201 days JLP 1962
2
No image.png
Sir Donald Sangster
(1911–1967)
23 February 196711 April 1967 47 days JLP 1967
3
Hugh Shearer.png
Hugh Shearer
(1923–2004)
11 April 19672 March 19724 years, 326 days JLP
4
Michael Manley.jpg
Michael Manley
(1924–1997)
2 March 19721 November 19808 years, 244 days PNP 1972
1976
5
Edward Seaga.png
Edward Seaga
(1930–2019)
1 November 198010 February 19898 years, 101 days JLP 1980
1983
(4)
Michael Manley.jpg
Michael Manley
(1924–1997)
10 February 198930 March 19923 years, 49 days PNP 1989
6
PJPatterson.jpg
P. J. Patterson
(born 1935)
30 March 199230 March 200614 years, 0 days PNP 1993
1997
2002
7
Portia Miller Shoot.Jpeg
Portia Simpson-Miller
(born 1945)
30 March 200611 September 20071 year, 165 days PNP
8
Bruce Golding.jpg
Bruce Golding
(born 1947)
11 September 200723 October 20114 years, 42 days JLP 2007
9
Andrew Holness Press (cropped).jpg
Andrew Holness
(born 1972)
23 October 20115 January 201274 days JLP
(7)
Portia Miller Shoot.Jpeg
Portia Simpson-Miller
(born 1945)
5 January 20123 March 20164 years, 58 days PNP 2011
(9)
Andrew Holness Press (cropped).jpg
Andrew Holness
(born 1972)
3 March 2016Incumbent6 years, 294 days JLP 2016
2020

By tenure

Rank by
length
of terms
Prime MinisterTook officeLeft officeLength by
time served
AdministrationsElectedPolitical affiliation
1 P. J. Patterson 30 March 199230 March 200614 years1 1993
1997
2002
People's National Party
2 Michael Manley 2 March 1972
10 February 1989
1 November 1980
30 March 1992
11 years, 292 days
(8 years, 244 days;
3 years, 48 days)
2 1972
1976
1989
People's National Party
3 Edward Seaga 1 November 198010 February 19898 years, 101 days1 1980
1983
Jamaica Labour Party
4 Andrew Holness
(incumbent)
23 October 2011
3 March 2016
5 January 2012
present
7 years, 2 days
(74 days;
6 years, 294 days)
2 2016
2020
Jamaica Labour Party
5 Portia Simpson Miller 30 March 2006
5 January 2012
11 September 2007
3 March 2016
5 years, 223 days
(1 year, 165 days;
4 years, 58 days)
2 2011 People's National Party
6 Hugh Shearer 11 April 19672 March 19724 years, 326 days1 Jamaica Labour Party
7 Alexander Bustamante 29 April 196223 February 19674 years, 201 days1 1962 Jamaica Labour Party
8 Bruce Golding 11 September 200723 October 20114 years, 42 days1 2007 Jamaica Labour Party
9 Donald Sangster 23 February 196711 April 196747 days1 1967 Jamaica Labour Party

See also

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References

  1. "Earnings By Politicians And What They Take Home". rjrnewsonline.com.
  2. JLP Wins Second Term. 3 September 2020. Accessed 5 September 2020.
  3. "Vale Royal – Office of the Prime Minister".
  4. 1 2 "Jamaica House". Office of the Prime Minister. A Brief History, In Residence, Offices. Retrieved 4 December 2022.
  5. Public Broadcasting Corporation of Jamaica [@pbcjamaica] (8 November 2022). "Questions to the Prime Minister" (Tweet) via Twitter.