1932 Motueka by-election

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1932 Motueka by-election
Flag of New Zealand.svg
  1931 general 1 December 1932 (1932-12-01) 1935 general  
  Keith Holyoake (1933).jpg Paddy Webb.jpg Roderick McKenzie 1900's.jpg
Candidate Keith Holyoake Paddy Webb Roderick McKenzie
Party Reform Labour Liberal–Labour
Popular vote3,8873,210829

Member before election

George Black
Independent

Elected Member

Keith Holyoake
Reform

The 1932 Motueka by-election was a by-election in the New Zealand electorate of Motueka, a rural seat at the top of the South Island.

By-elections, also spelled bye-elections, are used to fill elected offices that have become vacant between general elections.

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

An electorate is a geographical constituency used for electing members to the New Zealand Parliament. In informal discussion, electorates are often called seats. The most formal description, electoral district, is used in legislation. The size of electorates is determined on a population basis such that all electorates have approximately the same population.

Motueka is a former New Zealand parliamentary electorate. It was first created in 1860 and lasted until 1890 election. In 1896 election the Motueka electorate was recreated, and lasted until 1946 election.

Contents

The by-election occurred on 1 December 1932, and was precipitated by the suicide of sitting Independent member of parliament George Black on 17 October 1932. [1]

An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent.

George Black (New Zealand politician) New Zealand politician

George Charles Cecil Black was a member of the House of Representatives for Motueka electorate, in the South Island of New Zealand, initially as a representative of the United Party and from early 1931 as an Independent. He committed suicide and was succeeded as MP by Keith Holyoake.

The by-election was contested by Keith Holyoake (Reform Party candidate for the United/Reform Coalition), Paddy Webb (Labour Party), and 80 year old Roderick McKenzie, ex-MP for Motueka (18961914) standing as Independent Liberal–Labour.

Keith Holyoake 20th-century Governor-General, Prime Minister of New Zealand, politician

Sir Keith Jacka Holyoake was the 26th Prime Minister of New Zealand, serving for a brief period in 1957 and then from 1960 to 1972, and also the 13th Governor-General of New Zealand, serving from 1977 to 1980. He is the only New Zealand politician to date to have held both positions.

The Reform Party, formally the New Zealand Political Reform League, was New Zealand's second major political party, having been founded as a conservative response to the original Liberal Party. It was in government between 1912 and 1928, and later formed a coalition with the United Party, and then merged with United to form the modern National Party.

Paddy Webb New Zealand politician

Patrick Charles Webb was a New Zealand trade unionist and politician.

1931 general election result

1931 General election: Motueka [2]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Independent George Black 4,18053.30-0.75
Reform Keith Holyoake 3,66346.70
Majority5176.59-1.50
Informal votes370.47-0.21
Turnout 7,88088.51-1.71
Registered electors 8,903
Independent hold Swing

1932 by-election result

The following table gives the election results:

1932 Motueka by-election [3] [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Reform Keith Holyoake 3,887 49.04 +2.34
Labour Paddy Webb 3,21040.50
Liberal–Labour Roderick McKenzie 82910.46
Majority6778.54+1.95
Turnout 7,92689.03+0.52
Registered electors 8,903
Reform gain from Independent Swing

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References

  1. "Death by Poisoning". The Evening Post . CXIV (101). 26 October 1932. p. 10. Retrieved 15 August 2011.
  2. The General Election, 1931. Government Printer. 1932. p. 3. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  3. "Govt. wins Motueka by-election". Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle. XXVIII (1402). 6 December 1932. p. 2. Retrieved 15 August 2011.
  4. "Nelson and Motueka". The Evening Post . CXX (97). 21 October 1935. p. 11. Retrieved 24 November 2014.