Amelia Kerr

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Amelia Kerr
2020 ICC W T20 WC NZ v SL 02-22 A Kerr (01).jpg
Kerr playing for New Zealand during the 2020 ICC Women's T20 World Cup
Personal information
Full nameAmelia Charlotte Kerr
Born (2000-10-13) 13 October 2000 (age 20)
Wellington, New Zealand
NicknameMelie, Melos, Melux
BattingRight-handed
BowlingRight-arm leg break
Role All-rounder
Relations Jess Kerr (sister)
Robbie Kerr (father)
Bruce Murray (grandfather)
International information
National side
ODI debut(cap  135)9 November 2016 v  Pakistan
Last ODI10 April 2021 v  Australia
T20I debut(cap  49)21 November 2016 v  Pakistan
Last T20I1 April 2021 v  Australia
Domestic team information
YearsTeam
2014/15–present Wellington
2018 Southern Vipers
2019 Velocity
2019/20–present Brisbane Heat
Career statistics
Competition WODI WT20I
Matches4041
Runs scored682217
Batting average 31.0015.50
100s/50s1/20/0
Top score232* 36
Balls bowled2,020881
Wickets 5939
Bowling average 25.2822.33
5 wickets in innings 10
10 wickets in match00
Best bowling5/173/16
Catches/stumpings 19/–22/–
Source: ESPNCricinfo, 10 April 2021

Amelia Charlotte Kerr (born 13 October 2000) is a New Zealand cricketer who currently plays for Wellington and New Zealand. [1] [2] On 13 June 2018, Kerr made the highest individual score in a WODI match, and became the youngest cricketer, male or female, to score a double century in One Day International cricket, when she scored 232 not out against Ireland. [3] The double century was also the third-highest individual score, male or female, in an ODI, second-highest by a New Zealander and highest in a Women's ODI. [4] [5] [6] [7] Later in the same match, she also took 5 wickets for 17 runs, her first five-wicket haul in WODIs. [8] [9]

Contents

In August 2018, she was awarded a central contract by New Zealand Cricket, following the tours of Ireland and England in the previous months. [10] [11] In October 2018, she was named in New Zealand's squad for the 2018 ICC Women's World Twenty20 tournament in the West Indies. [12] [13] Ahead of the tournament, she was named as the player to watch in the team. [14]

In March 2019, she was named as the ANZ International Women's ODI Player of the Year at the annual New Zealand Cricket awards. [15] In January 2020, she was named in New Zealand's squad for the 2020 ICC Women's T20 World Cup in Australia. [16]

Personal life

Kerr's mother Jo and father Robbie both played cricket at domestic level representing Wellington. [17] Her elder sister Jess, who plays for Wellington was, in January 2020, named in New Zealand's national cricket squad against South Africa women. [18] Her grandfather, Bruce Murray, played Test cricket for New Zealand. [19] Her cousin, Cilla Duncan, represented New Zealand (Football Ferns) at international football. [20]

Jess is a teacher in Tawa Intermediate, in which they were both alumni, and Amelia became a teacher aide for autistic students. [21]

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References

  1. "'I want to be one step ahead of the batters' – Amelia Kerr". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 10 July 2018.
  2. "20 women cricketers for the 2020s". The Cricket Monthly. Retrieved 24 November 2020.
  3. "Celebrating up and coming cricketers this International Youth Day". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 12 August 2020.
  4. Staff writer (13 June 2018). "17-year-old Amelia Kerr blasts 232* to record highest individual score in women's ODIs". The Times of India . Retrieved 13 June 2018.
  5. "Amelia Kerr sends more records tumbling in Dublin". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 13 June 2018.
  6. "Highest Individual Innings in Women's ODI matches". Wisden Records. Retrieved 21 February 2021.
  7. "Highest Individual Innings in ODI matches". Wisden Records. Retrieved 21 February 2021.
  8. "Teenage Kerr stars with record 232* and five wickets as New Zealand win big". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 13 June 2018.
  9. "Record-breaking Amelia Kerr has 'the world ahead of her'". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 14 June 2018.
  10. "Rachel Priest left out of New Zealand women contracts". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 2 August 2018.
  11. "Four new players included in White Ferns contract list". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 2 August 2018.
  12. "New Zealand women pick spin-heavy squads for Australia T20Is, World T20". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 18 September 2018.
  13. "White Ferns turn to spin in big summer ahead". New Zealand Cricket. Archived from the original on 18 September 2018. Retrieved 18 September 2018.
  14. "Key Players: New Zealand". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
  15. "Williamson named NZ Player of the Year at ANZ Awards". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 21 March 2019.
  16. "Lea Tahuhu returns to New Zealand squad for T20 World Cup". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 29 January 2020.
  17. "Schoolgirl Scores Big On The Hawkins Basin Reserve". Cricket Wellington. Retrieved 18 June 2018.
  18. "Sophie Devine named New Zealand captain". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 24 January 2020.
  19. "Women's World Cup – Eight youngsters to watch". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 22 June 2017.
  20. Priscilla Duncan (13 June 2018). "Tweet Number 1006942630138163200". Twitter . Retrieved 13 June 2018. UNBELIEVABLE! My cousin Melie Kerr has just set a WORLD RECORD for the highest score in a one-dayer with 232 not out.. and she's only 17!!!
  21. "White Ferns star Amelia Kerr: From teaching autistic children to three months in a cricket bubble". Stuff. 11 September 2020. Retrieved 24 December 2020.

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