Asaphodes

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Asaphodes
Asaphodes ida AMNZ21823-a.jpg
Holotype specimen of Asaphodes ida
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Euarthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Geometridae
Subfamily: Larentiinae
Genus:Asaphodes
Meyrick 1885
Synonyms [1]
  • ThyoneMeyrick, 1883

Asaphodes is a genus of moths in the family Geometridae erected by Edward Meyrick in 1885. [2] This genus is endemic to New Zealand. [1]

Moth Group of mostly-nocturnal insects in the order Lepidoptera

Moths comprise a group of insects related to butterflies, belonging to the order Lepidoptera. Most lepidopterans are moths, and there are thought to be approximately 160,000 species of moth, many of which have yet to be described. Most species of moth are nocturnal, but there are also crepuscular and diurnal species.

Edward Meyrick FRS was an English schoolmaster and amateur entomologist. He was an expert on Microlepidoptera and some consider him one of the founders of modern Microlepidoptera systematics.

Endemism Ecological state of being unique to a defined geographic location or habitat

Endemism is the ecological state of a species being unique to a defined geographic location, such as an island, nation, country or other defined zone, or habitat type; organisms that are indigenous to a place are not endemic to it if they are also found elsewhere. The extreme opposite of endemism is cosmopolitan distribution. An alternative term for a species that is endemic is precinctive, which applies to species that are restricted to a defined geographical area.

Species

The species found in the genus Asaphodes include:

<i>Asaphodes abrogata</i> species of moth

Asaphodes abrogata is a moth of the Geometridae family. It is endemic to New Zealand. It was first described by Francis Walker in 1862 using a specimen collected by P. Earl in Waikouaiti. The type specimen of this species is held at the Natural History Museum.

<i>Asaphodes adonis</i> species of moth

Asaphodes adonis is a species of moth in the Geometridae family. It is endemic to New Zealand.

<i>Asaphodes aegrota</i> species of moth

Asaphodes aegrota is a species of moth in the Geometridae family. It was first described by Arthur Gardiner Butler in 1879 as Selidosema aegrota. It is endemic to New Zealand.

Related Research Articles

<i>Orocrambus</i> genus of insects

Orocrambus is a genus of moths of the Crambidae family. All species are endemic to New Zealand.

<i>Scoparia</i> (moth) genus of insects

Scoparia is a grass moth genus of subfamily Scopariinae. Some authors have assigned the synonymous taxon Sineudonia to the snout moth family (Pyralidae), where all grass moths were once also included, but this seems to be in error.

<i>Austrocidaria</i> genus of insects

Austrocidaria is a genus of moths in the family Geometridae. It was described by John S. Dugdale in 1971.

Dasyuris is a genus of moths in the family Geometridae first described by Achille Guenée in 1868.

<i>Pseudocoremia</i> genus of insects

Pseudocoremia is a genus of moths in the family Geometridae erected by Arthur Gardiner Butler in 1877. This genus is endemic to New Zealand.

<i>Scopula</i> Genus of geometer moths in subfamily Sterrhinae

Scopula is a genus of moths in the family Geometridae described by Franz von Paula Schrank in 1802.

Harmologa is a genus of moths belonging to the subfamily Tortricinae of the family Tortricidae.

<i>Borkhausenia</i> genus of insects

Borkhausenia is a genus of the concealer moth family (Oecophoridae) described by Jacob Hübner in 1825. Among these, it belongs to subfamily Oecophorinae, wherein it is probably closely related to Hofmannophila. In the past, several other Oecophoridae have been included in Borkhausenia, as well as a few even more distant members of the superfamily Gelechioidea. Metalampra was originally described as a subgenus of Borkhausenia. Telechrysis has also been included here as a subgenus by some, while other authors have considered it a separate genus in the Oecophorinae or – if these are also considered distinct – the Amphisbatinae.

<i>Sabatinca</i> Genus of moths in family Micropterigidae

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Asterivora is a genus of moths in the family Choreutidae. Asterivora was described by J. S. Dugdale in 1979.

Carposina is a genus of moths in the Carposinidae family.

<i>Heterocrossa</i> genus of insects

Heterocrossa is a genus of moths in the Carposinidae family. It is endemic to New Zealand. This genus was previously regarded as a synonym of the genus Carposina. However Elwood C. Zimmerman in Insects of Hawaii removed Heterocrossa from synonymy with Carposina. Zimmerman argued that as the genitalia of Heterocrossa and Carposina are distinct, Heterocrossa should not be regarded as a synonym of Carposina. This was agreed with by John S. Dugdale in his annotated catalogue of New Zealand lepidoptera.

<i>Asaphodes cataphracta</i> species of moth

Asaphodes cataphracta is a moth in the Geometridae family. It is endemic to New Zealand and is found in the South Island.

<i>Asaphodes imperfecta</i> species of moth

Asaphodes imperfecta is a moth in the Geometridae family. It is endemic to New Zealand. It is classified as critically endangered by the Department of Conservation.

<i>Gymnobathra</i> genus of insects

Gymnobathra is a genus of moths in the family Oecophoridae. It was first described by Edward Meyrick in 1883. All species are found in New Zealand.

<i>Asaphodes exoriens</i> species of moth endemic to New Zealand

Asaphodes exoriens is a species of moth in the family Geometridae. This species is endemic to New Zealand.

<i>Tingena</i> genus of insects

Tingena is a genus of the concealer moth family (Oecophoridae). This genus is endemic to New Zealand. It was described by Francis Walker in 1864.

References

  1. 1 2 "Asaphodes Walker, 1862". New Zealand Organisms Register. Landcare Research New Zealand Ltd. Retrieved 13 January 2017.
  2. Pitkin, Brian & Jenkins, Paul (5 November 2004). "Asaphodes Meyrick, 1885". Butterflies and Moths of the World. Natural History Museum, London. Retrieved 17 May 2019.