Athletics at the 1955 World Festival of Youth and Students

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The 5th World Festival of Youth and Students featured an athletics competition among its programme of events. The events were contested in Warsaw, Poland in August 1955. Mainly contested among Eastern European athletes, it served as an alternative to the more Western European-oriented 1955 Summer International University Sports Week held in San Sebastián the same year. [1]

The Fifth World Festival of Youth and Students (WFYS) was held in 1955, in Warsaw, the capital of the then People's Republic of Poland.

Warsaw City metropolis in Masovia, Poland

Warsaw is the capital and largest city of Poland. The metropolis stands on the Vistula River in east-central Poland and its population is officially estimated at 1.78 million residents within a greater metropolitan area of 3.1 million residents, which makes Warsaw the 8th most-populous capital city in the European Union. The city limits cover 516.9 square kilometres (199.6 sq mi), while the metropolitan area covers 6,100.43 square kilometres (2,355.39 sq mi). Warsaw is an alpha global city, a major international tourist destination, and a significant cultural, political and economic hub. Its historical Old Town was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Eastern Europe Eastern part of the European continent

Eastern Europe is the eastern part of the European continent. There is no consistent definition of the precise area it covers, partly because the term has a wide range of geopolitical, geographical, cultural, and socioeconomic connotations. There are "almost as many definitions of Eastern Europe as there are scholars of the region". A related United Nations paper adds that "every assessment of spatial identities is essentially a social and cultural construct". One definition describes Eastern Europe as a cultural entity: the region lying in Europe with the main characteristics consisting of Greek, Byzantine, Eastern Orthodox, Russian, and some Ottoman culture influences. Another definition was created during the Cold War and used more or less synonymously with the term Eastern Bloc. A similar definition names the formerly communist European states outside the Soviet Union as Eastern Europe. The majority of historians and social scientists view such definitions as outdated or relegated, but they are still sometimes used for statistical purposes.

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Following the one-off stand-alone athletics tournament held by the Union Internationale des Étudiants (the 1954 World Student Games), the resumption of the UIE athletics tournament within the World Festival marked a return to top level competitions. The men's winners of the 1954 European Athletics Championships were greatly represented at the competition, with the eleven champions being: Ardalion Ignatyev, Lajos Szentgáli, Emil Zátopek, Yevgeniy Bulanchik, Anatoliy Yulin, Josef Doležal, Ödön Földessy, Leonid Shcherbakov, Mikhail Krivonosov, Janusz Sidło and Vasili Kuznetsov. Triple jumper Leonid Shcherbakov retained his position as the sole man to win that event at the festival; extending his streak from 1949, his fourth straight win at the festival made him the most successful individual male athlete of the competition's history. [1] [2]

The 1954 World Student Games were an athletics competition held in Budapest, Hungary by the Union Internationale des Étudiants (UIE). It marked a one-off departure from the athletics event being linked to the biennial World Festival of Youth and Students.

1954 European Athletics Championships 1954 edition of the European Athletics Championships

The 5th European Athletics Championships were held at Stadion Neufeld from 25–29 August 1954 in the Swiss capital Bern. Contemporaneous reports on the event were given in the Glasgow Herald.

Ardalion Vasilyevich Ignatyev was a Soviet athlete who mainly competed in the 400 metres. He was born in the village of Novoye Toyderyakovo, Yalchiksky District, Chuvash ASSR.

In the women's events, the appearance of Australia's Shirley Strickland (a 1952 Olympic champion) added a global element to the normally European contests. She won both the 100 metres and 80 metres hurdles events, as well as taking the 200 metres bronze. Women's European champion Nina Otkalenko won the 800 metres, while reigning Olympic champion Nina Ponomaryova won her fourth straight discus throw title at this competition (only one of two women ever to achieve that feat at the competition, after Iolanda Balaș). Fellow Soviet Olympic champion Galina Zybina took her third world student title in the shot put. Aleksandra Chudina took her ninth career title at the tournament across all events, winning in the javelin throw. Iolanda Balaș won the high jump, following her win at the 1954 World Student Games, and fellow 1954 winner Ursula Donath won the 400 metres in Warsaw. [1]

Shirley Strickland Australian hurdler and sprinter

Shirley Barbara de la Hunty AO, MBE, known as Shirley Strickland during her early career, was an Australian athlete. She won more Olympic medals than any other Australian in running sports.

1952 Summer Olympics Games of the XV Olympiad, held in Helsinki in 1952

The 1952 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XV Olympiad, were an international multi-sport event held in Helsinki, Finland, from July 19 to August 3, 1952.

100 metres Sprint race

The 100 metres, or 100-metre dash, is a sprint race in track and field competitions. The shortest common outdoor running distance, it is one of the most popular and prestigious events in the sport of athletics. It has been contested at the Summer Olympics since 1896 for men and since 1928 for women.

Medal summary

Men

EventGoldSilverBronze
100 metresFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Leonid Bartenyev  (URS)10.4Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Boris Tokarev  (URS)10.4Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Béla Goldoványi  (HUN)10.5
200 metresFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Václav Janeček  (TCH)21.2Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Edward Szmidt  (POL)21.3Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Leonid Bartenyev  (URS)21.3
400 metresFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Ardalion Ignatyev  (URS)47.2Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Zbigniew Makomaski  (POL)47.9Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Zoltán Adamik  (HUN)48.0
800 metresFlag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Lajos Szentgáli  (HUN)1:51.9Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Roman Kreft  (POL)1:52.4Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Ludvík Liška  (TCH)1:52.6
1500 metresFlag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  László Tábori  (HUN)3:41.6Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  István Rózsavölgyi  (HUN)3:42.0Flag of East Germany.svg  Siegfried Herrmann  (GDR)3:42.6
5000 metresFlag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Jerzy Chromik  (POL)13:55.2Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Sándor Iharos  (HUN)13:56.6Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  József Kovács  (HUN)13:57.6
10,000 metresFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Emil Zátopek  (TCH)29:34.4Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Grigoriy Basalyev  (URS)29:50.6Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Stanisław Ożóg  (POL)29:51.8
MarathonFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Ivan Filin  (URS)2:28:42Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Boris Grishayev  (URS)2:28:42Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Drahomír Pechánek  (TCH)2:34:20
110 m hurdlesFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Boris Stolyarov  (URS)14.6Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Vyacheslav Bogatov  (URS)14.6Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Yevgeniy Bulanchik  (URS)14.7
400 m hurdlesFlag of Romania (1952-1965).svg  Ilie Savel  (ROM)52.1Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Anatoliy Yulin  (URS)52.2Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Yuriy Lituyev  (URS)52.8
3000 metres steeplechaseFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Vasiliy Vlasenko  (URS)8:49.4Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Vlastimil Brlica  (TCH)8:54.0Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Mikhail Saltykov  (URS)9:01.2
20 km walkFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Josef Doležal  (TCH)1:32:55Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Mikhail Lavrov  (URS)1:35:32Flag of Romania (1952-1965).svg  Dumitru Paraschivescu  (ROM)1:40:10
50 km walkFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Mikhail Lavrov  (URS)4:16:52Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Josef Doležal  (TCH)4:29:09Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Yevgeniy Maskinskov  (URS)4:32:54
4 × 100 m relayFlag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary  (HUN)40.7Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union  (URS)40.8Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland  (POL)40.9
4 × 400 m relayFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union  (URS)3:11.6Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland  (POL)3:11.8Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany  (GDR)3:14.2
High jumpFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Jaroslav Kovář  (TCH)1.99 mFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Volodymyr Sitkin  (URS)1.99 mFlag of Romania (1952-1965).svg  Ioan Soter  (ROM)1.96 m
Pole vaultFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Vitaliy Chernobay  (URS)4.35 mFlag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Zenon Ważny  (POL)4.30 mFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Vladimir Bulatov  (URS)4.30 m
Long jumpFlag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Ödön Földessy  (HUN)7.42 mFlag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Kazimierz Kropidłowski  (POL)7.29 mFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Vladimir Popov  (URS)7.23 m
Triple jumpFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Leonid Shcherbakov  (URS)16.35 mFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Yevgeniy Chen  (URS)15.80 mFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Martin Řehák  (TCH)15.46 m
Shot putFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Otto Grigalka  (URS)17.05 mFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Jiří Skobla  (TCH)16.94 mFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Feliks Pirts  (URS)16.58 m
Discus throwFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Boris Matveyev  (URS)54.41 mFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Karel Merta  (TCH)53.01 mFlag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  József Szécsényi  (HUN)52.56 m
Hammer throwFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Mikhail Krivonosov  (URS)64.33 mFlag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  József Csermák  (HUN)61.48 mFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Nikolay Ryedkin  (URS)60.20 m
Javelin throwFlag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Janusz Sidło  (POL)77.93 mFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Aleksandr Gorshkov  (URS)75.02 mFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Vladimir Kuznetsov  (URS)72.08 m
DecathlonFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Vasili Kuznetsov  (URS)7262 ptsFlag of East Germany.svg  Walter Meier  (GDR)6834 ptsFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Boris Stolyarov  (URS)6700 pts

Women

EventGoldSilverBronze
100 metresFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Shirley Strickland de la Hunty  (AUS)11.3Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Vera Neszmélyi  (HUN)11.5Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Zinaida Safronova  (URS)11.6
200 metresFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Zinaida Safronova  (URS)24.2Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Mariya Itkina  (URS)24.5Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Shirley Strickland de la Hunty  (AUS)24.5
400 metresFlag of East Germany.svg  Ursula Donath  (GDR)54.4Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Nina Otkalenko  (URS)55.5Flag of Romania (1952-1965).svg  Alexandra Sicoe  (ROM)56.0
800 metresFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Nina Otkalenko  (URS)2:09.4Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Lyudmila Lisenko  (URS)2:10.0Flag of East Germany.svg  Ursula Donath  (GDR)2:10.2
80 m hurdlesFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Shirley Strickland de la Hunty  (AUS)11.1Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Galina Grinvald  (URS)11.2Flag of East Germany.svg  Gisela Köhler  (GDR)11.2
4 × 100 m relayFlag of East Germany.svg  East Germany  (GDR)47.0Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary  (HUN)47.3Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland  (POL)47.4
High jumpFlag of Romania (1952-1965).svg  Iolanda Balaș  (ROM)1.66 mFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Olga Modrachová  (TCH)1.64 mFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Mariya Pisareva  (URS)1.64 m
Long jumpFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Galina Vinogradova  (URS)6.27 mFlag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Maria Kusion  (POL)5.92 mFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Valentina Lituyeva  (URS)5.90 m
Shot putFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Galina Zybina  (URS)15.43 mFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Zinaida Doinikova  (URS)14.91 mFlag of East Germany.svg  Johanna Lüttge  (GDR)14.12 m
Discus throwFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Nina Ponomaryova  (URS)49.28 mFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Irina Beglyakova  (URS)47.12 mFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Štepánka Mertová  (TCH)46.74 m
Javelin throwFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Aleksandra Chudina  (URS)51.60 mFlag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Maria Ciach  (POL)48.99 mFlag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Jadwiga Majka  (POL)47.89? m
PentathlonFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Galina Grinvald  (URS)4575 ptsFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Galina Dolzhenkova  (URS)4486 ptsFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Nina Martinenko  (URS)4470 pts

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union  (URS)20171552
2Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia  (TCH)45413
Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary  (HUN)45413
4Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland  (POL)28414
5Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany  (GDR)2158
6Flag of Romania (1952-1965).svg  Romania  (ROM)2035
7Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia  (AUS)2013
Totals (7 nations)363636108

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References

  1. 1 2 3 World Student Games (UIE). GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2014-12-09.
  2. European Championships (Men). GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2014-12-10.
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