Athletics at the 1964 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

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Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the XVIII Olympiad
Venue Olympic Stadium
Tokyo, Japan
Dates14 October (heats, quarterfinals)
15 October 1964 (semifinals, finals)
Competitors73 from 49 nations
Winning time10.0 seconds
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Bob Hayes Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Silver medal icon.svg Enrique Figuerola Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba
Bronze medal icon.svg Harry Jerome Canadian Red Ensign (1957-1965).svg  Canada
  1960
1968  
Official Video Highlights TV-icon-2.svg
Official Video Highlights

The men's 100 metres was the shortest of the men's track races in the Athletics at the 1964 Summer Olympics program in Tokyo, Japan. It was held at the Olympic Stadium on 14 and 15 October 1964. 76 athletes from 49 nations entered, with 3 not starting in the first round. Nations were limited to three athletes each, per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The first two rounds were held on 14 October, with the semifinals and the final on the following day. [1]

Contents

In the final, American Bob Hayes tied the world record of 10.0 seconds and won the gold medal. Enrique Figuerola of Cuba and Harry Jerome of Canada tied the old Olympic record time. It was Cuba's first medal in the event; Canada earned its first men's 100 metres medal since 1928.

Background

This was the fifteenth time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. Neither of the top two runners from 1960 returned, but Rome bronze medalist Brit Peter Radford and fourth-place finisher Cuban Enrique Figuerola did. Other notable entrants were American Bob Hayes (the favorite who was unbeaten in the event, including the 100 yards variant, since 1962) and Canadian Harry Jerome (a 1960 semifinalist who held a share of the world record). [2] A muscle strain prevented Venezuelan Horacio Esteves (another 1960 semifinalist with a share of the world record) from competing. [3]

Cameroon, the Republic of the Congo, the Dominican Republic, Iran, the Ivory Coast, Madagascar, Mali, Northern Rhodesia, Rhodesia, Senegal, and Vietnam were represented in the event for the first time. The new federation of Malaysia also competed for the first time, though both Malaya and Singapore had previously appeared. The United States was the only nation to have appeared at each of the first fifteen Olympic men's 100 metres events.

Competition format

The event retained the same basic four round format from 1920–1960: heats, quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. However, after an extremely static format from 1936 to 1956, the format was modified for a second time in 1964 after 1960's tweaks. The changes generally increased the number of athletes in each race; for the first time in Olympic men's 100 metres history, 8 runners competed at a time. [2]

1936–5619601964
HeatsNumber of heats12910
Athletes per heatUp to 76–77–8
Qualifiers per heat233
QuarterfinalsNumber of heats444
Athletes per heat66–77–8
Qualifiers per heat334
SemifinalsNumber of heats222
Athletes per heat668
Qualifiers per heat334
FinalsNumber of heats111
Athletes per heat668

Records

Prior to the competition, the existing World and Olympic records were as follows.

World record 10.0 Flag of Germany.svg Armin Hary Zürich, Switzerland 21 June 1960
10.0 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Harry Jerome Saskatoon, Canada 15 July 1960
10.0 Flag of Venezuela.svg Horacio Esteves Caracas, Venezuela 15 August 1964
Olympic record10.2 Flag of Germany.svg Armin Hary Rome, Italy 31 August 1960
10.3 Flag of Germany.svg Armin Hary Rome, Italy 31 August 1960
10.3 Flag of the United States.svg Dave Sime Rome, Italy 31 August 1960

Bob Hayes had an official time of 10.0 seconds in the final, breaking the Olympic record by 0.2 seconds and matching the world record. His official time of 9.9 seconds in the semifinals did not count for records purposes because of wind assistance.

Results

First round

The top three runners in each of the 10 heats advanced. The Official Report describes the weather for these heats as 'rainy'. The wind varied widely, between a 2.85 m/s headwind (in heat 3) and a 1.60 m/s tailwind (in heat 6). [4]

Heat 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Hideo Iijima Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.3Q
2 Bernard Laidebeur Flag of France.svg  France 10.5Q
3 Edvin Ozolin Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 10.5Q
4 Kenneth Powell Flag of India.svg  India 10.7
5 Zbigniew Syka Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.7
6 Jean-Louis Ravelomanantsoa Flag of Madagascar.svg  Madagascar 10.8
7 Sara Camara Flag of Mali.svg  Mali 11.3

Heat 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Trenton Jackson Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.5Q
2 Peter Radford Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.6Q
3 B. El Maachi Bouchaib Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco 10.6Q
4 Csaba Csutorás Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 10.7
5 Johan Du Preez Flag of Rhodesia (1964).svg  Rhodesia 10.7
6 Jeong Gi-seon Flag of South Korea (1949-1984).png  South Korea 11.0
7 Arnulfo Valles Flag of the Philippines (navy blue).svg  Philippines 11.1

Wind, -2.51 m/s

Heat 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Gaoussou Koné Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 10.5Q
2 Mel Pender Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.5Q
3 Michael Ahey Flag of Ghana (1964-1966).svg  Ghana 10.6Q
4 Franciscus Luitjes Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 10.6
5 Wilton Jackson Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.6
6 Lynn Davies Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.7
7 Gerardo di Tolla Flag of Peru.svg  Peru 10.9
8 Lee Ar-tu Flag of the Republic of China.svg  Republic of China 11.2

Heat 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Marian Dudziak Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.6Q
2 Stanley Fabian Allotey Flag of Ghana (1964-1966).svg  Ghana 10.6Q
3 John Owiti Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 10.6Q
4 Carlos Lorenzo Flag of Mexico (1934-1968).svg  Mexico 10.7
5 George Collie Flag of the Bahamas (1953-1964).svg  Bahamas 10.9
6 Masaru Kamata Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.9
7 Ho Thành Chinh Flag of South Vietnam.svg  Vietnam 11.9
Nikolay Politiko Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union DNS

Heat 5

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Harry Jerome Canadian Red Ensign (1957-1965).svg  Canada 10.5Q
2 Claude Piquemal Flag of France.svg  France 10.5Q
3 Lloyd Murad Flag of Venezuela (1954-2006).png  Venezuela 10.8Q
4 James Odongo Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 10.9
5 Gusman Kosanov Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 10.9
6 Abdoulaye N'Diaye Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 11.0
7 Levy Psawkin Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 11.1

Heat 6

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Heinz Schumann Flag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  United Team of Germany 10.5Q
2 Dennis O. Johnson Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.6Q
3 William Earle Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.7Q
4 Serafino Antao Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 10.7
5 Huba Rozsnyai Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 10.8
6 Alf Meakin Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.8
7 David Njitock Flag of Cameroon (1961-1975).svg  Cameroon 11.1
8 Akbar Babakhanlou State Flag of Iran (1964-1980).svg  Iran 11.1

Heat 7

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Wiesław Maniak Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.5Q
2 Arquímedes Herrera Flag of Venezuela (1954-2006).png  Venezuela 10.5Q
3 Mani Jegathesan Flag of Malaysia.svg  Malaysia 10.6Q
4 José de Rocha Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 11.0
5 Bassirou Doumbia Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 11.0
6 Francisco Gutiérrez Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 11.0
7 Iftikhar Shah Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 11.4

Heat 8

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Bob Hayes Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.4Q
2 Tom Robinson Flag of the Bahamas (1953-1964).svg  Bahamas 10.5Q
3 Bob Lay Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.5Q
4 Ito Jiani Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10.6
5 Rogelio Onofre Flag of the Philippines (navy blue).svg  Philippines 10.7
6 Khudher Zalada Flag of Iraq (1963-1991); Flag of Syria (1963-1972).svg  Iraq 11.1
David Ejoke Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria DNS

Heat 9

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Fritz Obersiebrasse Flag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  United Team of Germany 10.4Q
2 Iván Moreno Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 10.5Q
3 Pablo McNeil Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.5Q
4 László Mihályfi Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 10.6
5 Gary Holdsworth Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.6
6 Max Barandun Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland 10.7
7 Jeffery Smith Flag of Northern Rhodesia (1939-1953).svg  Northern Rhodesia 10.8
Wesley Johnson Flag of Liberia.svg  Liberia DNF

Heat 10

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Enrique Figuerola Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.5Q
2 Lynn Headley Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.5Q
3 Roger Bambuck Flag of France.svg  France 10.6Q
4 Manfred Knickenberg Flag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  United Team of Germany 10.7
5 Léon Yombe Flag of the Republic of the Congo.svg  Republic of the Congo 10.8
6 Alberto Torres Flag of the Dominican Republic.svg  Dominican Republic 10.9
7 Suthi Manyakass Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 10.9
8 Rogelio Rivas Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain 11.1

Quarterfinals

The top four runners in each of the four second round heats advanced to the semifinals. The weather was cloudy and winds were tailwinds throughout. [5]

Quarterfinal 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1Harry JeromeCanadian Red Ensign (1957-1965).svg  Canada 10.3Q
2Trenton JacksonFlag of the United States.svg  United States 10.4Q
3Fritz ObersiebrasseFlag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  United Team of Germany 10.4Q
4Gaoussou KonéFlag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 10.4Q
5Dennis O. JohnsonFlag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.5
6Marian DudziakFlag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.5
7Bernard LaidebeurFlag of France.svg  France 10.5
8William Joseph EarleFlag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.9

Wind, +1.90 m/s

Quarterfinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1Enrique FiguerolaFlag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.3Q
2Wiesław ManiakFlag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.3Q
3Bob LayFlag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.4Q
4Claude PiquemalFlag of France.svg  France 10.4Q
5Edvin OzolinFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 10.4
6B. El Maachi BouchaibFlag of Morocco.svg  Morocco 10.5
7John OwitiFlag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 10.6

Quarterfinal 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1Tom RobinsonFlag of the Bahamas (1953-1964).svg  Bahamas 10.3Q
2Mel PenderFlag of the United States.svg  United States 10.4Q
3Iijima HideoFlag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.5Q
4Pablo McNeilFlag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.5Q
5Mani JegathesanFlag of Malaysia.svg  Malaysia 10.6
6Ivan MorenoFlag of Chile.svg  Chile 10.6
7Stanley Fabian AlloteyFlag of Ghana (1964-1966).svg  Ghana 10.7
8Lloyd MuradFlag of Venezuela (1954-2006).png  Venezuela 10.7

Quarterfinal 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1Bob HayesFlag of the United States.svg  United States 10.3Q
2Arquimedes HerreraFlag of Venezuela (1954-2006).png  Venezuela 10.4Q
3Lynn HeadleyFlag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.4Q
4Heinz SchumannFlag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  United Team of Germany 10.5Q
5Peter RadfordFlag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.5
6Roger BambuckFlag of France.svg  France 10.5
7Michael AheyFlag of Ghana (1964-1966).svg  Ghana 10.6

Semifinals

The top four runners in each of the two semifinals advanced to the final. The weather was described as "fine," with lower humidity than the first two rounds and a temperature of 23.8 degrees Celsius. There was a strong tailwind for the first semifinal and a moderate headwind for the second. [6]

Semifinal 1

The tailwind speed of 5.28 m/s meant this semifinal was ineligible for record purposes.

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1Bob HayesFlag of the United States.svg  United States 9.9Q
2Wiesław ManiakFlag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.1Q
3Tom RobinsonFlag of the Bahamas (1953-1964).svg  Bahamas 10.2Q
4Heinz SchumannFlag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  United Team of Germany 10.3Q
5Robert William LayFlag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.3
6Pablo McNeilFlag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.3
7Arquimedes HerreraFlag of Venezuela (1954-2006).png  Venezuela 10.4
8Trenton JacksonFlag of the United States.svg  United States 10.6

Semifinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1Harry JeromeCanadian Red Ensign (1957-1965).svg  Canada 10.3Q
2Gaoussou KonéFlag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 10.4Q
3Enrique FiguerolaFlag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.4Q
4Mel PenderFlag of the United States.svg  United States 10.4Q
5Claude PiquemalFlag of France.svg  France 10.5
6Lynn HeadleyFlag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.5
7Iijima HideoFlag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.6
8Fritz ObersiebrasseFlag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  United Team of Germany 10.6

Final

Until the Tokyo Olympics world records were measured by officials with stopwatches, measured to the nearest tenth of a second. Although fully automatic timing was used in Tokyo, the times were given the appearance of manual timing. This was done by subtracting 0.05 seconds from the automatic time and rounding to the nearest tenth of a second, making Hayes' time of 10.06 seconds convert to 10.0 seconds (a new Olympic record and matching the existing world record), despite the fact that the officials with stopwatches had measured Hayes' time to be 9.9 seconds, [7] and the average difference between manual and automatic times was typically 0.15 to 0.20 seconds. This unique method of determining the official time therefore denied Hayes the record of being the first to officially record 9.9 seconds for the 100 meters. The first official times of 9.9 seconds were recorded at the "Night of Speed" in 1968.

The final was run in "fine" weather, with a tailwind of just over a metre per second. [6] Hayes ran on lane one, which had been damaged by competitors in the men's 10,000 metres and the men's 20 km walk. Nevertheless, his "margin of victory was described by Track & Field News as 'insulting to an Olympic final field.'" [2]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg Bob Hayes Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.0 =WR
Silver medal icon.svg Enrique Figuerola Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.2
Silver medal icon.svg Harry Jerome Canadian Red Ensign (1957-1965).svg  Canada 10.2
4 Wiesław Maniak Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 10.4
5 Heinz Schumann Flag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  United Team of Germany 10.4
6 Gaoussou Koné Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 10.4
7 Mel Pender Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.4
8 Tom Robinson Flag of the Bahamas (1953-1964).svg  Bahamas 10.5
The 100 m final. Left-right: Tom Robinson, Wieslaw Maniak, Harry Jerome, Gaoussou Kone, Enrique Figuerola, Heinz Schumann, Bob Hayes 100m dash 1964 Olympics.jpg
The 100 m final. Left-right: Tom Robinson, Wiesław Maniak, Harry Jerome, Gaoussou Koné, Enrique Figuerola, Heinz Schumann, Bob Hayes

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References

  1. "Athletics at the 1964 Tokyo Summer Games: Men's 100 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 22 July 2020.
  3. "Horacio conquistó el mundo hace 47 años". Solodeportes (in Spanish). Venezuela. 15 August 2011. Archived from the original on 15 September 2011. Retrieved 16 November 2011.
  4. Official Report, vol. 2, pp. 19–20.
  5. Official Report, vol. 2, p. 20.
  6. 1 2 Official Report, vol. 2, p. 21.
  7. revisionist history: men's 100 WR. trackandfieldnews.com. 1 November 2013