Athletics at the 1980 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

Last updated
Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the XXII Olympiad
Athletics pictogram.svg
Athletics
Venue Lenin Olympic Stadium
DateJuly 24 (heats)
July 25 (finals)
Competitors65 from 40 nations
Winning time10.25
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Allan Wells
Olympic flag.svg  Great Britain
Silver medal icon.svg Silvio Leonard
Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba
Bronze medal icon.svg Petar Petrov
Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Bulgaria
  1976
1984  
Official Video Highlights TV-icon-2.svg
Official Video Highlights

The men's 100 metres event was one of the events in the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. The competition was held on July 24, 1980, and on July 25, 1980. [1] Sixty-five athletes from 40 nations competed. [2] Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by Allan Wells of Great Britain, that nation's first title in the men's 100 metres since 1924. Cuba took its first medal in the event since 1964, with Silvio Leonard's silver matching the nation's best result. Petar Petrov's bronze was Bulgaria's first Olympic medal in the men's 100 metres.

Contents

Background

This was the nineteenth time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. Four finalists from 1980 returned: defending gold medal winner Hasely Crawford of Trinidad and Tobago, silver medalist Don Quarrie of Jamaica, seventh-place finisher Klaus-Dieter Kurrat of East Germany, and eight-place finisher Petar Petrov of Bulgaria. The American team, including 1977 IAAF World Cup winner Steve Williams, was absent due to boycott. Other notable entrants included Silvio Leonard of Cuba (1975 and 1979 Pan-American Games champion, 1976 Olympic quarterfinalist, 1977 World Cup bronze medal), Eugen Ray of East Germany (1977 World Cup silver medalist), and Allan Wells of Great Britain (second to Quarrie at the 1978 Commonwealth Games). [2]

Eleven nations appeared in the event for the first time: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Guinea, Laos, Lebanon, Mozambique, Nepal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, and Syria. The United States missed this event for the first time in Olympic history. France and Great Britain made their 16th appearances in the event, tied with Canada (also absent due to boycott) for second-most, after the United States with 18.

Competition format

The event retained the same basic four round format introduced in 1920: heats, quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. The "fastest loser" system, introduced in 1968, was used again to ensure that the quarterfinals and subsequent rounds had exactly 8 runners per heat; this time, that system applied only in the preliminary heats. With only 2 more runners than in 1976, the format was held very static—including the number of heats.

The first round consisted of 9 heats, each with 6–8 athletes. The top three runners in each heat advanced, along with the next five fastest runners overall. This made 32 quarterfinalists, who were divided into 4 heats of 8 runners. The top four runners in each quarterfinal advanced, with no "fastest loser" places. The 16 semifinalists competed in two heats of 8, with the top four in each semifinal advancing to the eight-man final. [2] [3]

Records

These are the standing world and Olympic records (in seconds) prior to the 1980 Summer Olympics.

World Record9.95 Flag of the United States.svg Jim Hines Mexico City (MEX)October 14, 1968
Olympic Record9.95 Flag of the United States.svg Jim Hines Mexico City (MEX)October 14, 1968

Results

Heats

RANKHEAT 1TIME
1.Flag of Cuba.svg  Silvio Leonard  (CUB)10.33
2.Flag of Nigeria.svg  Peter Okodogbe  (NGR)10.39
3.Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Christopher Brathwaite  (TRI)10.44
4.Flag of East Germany.svg  Klaus-Dieter Kurrat  (GDR)10.53
5.Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Charles Kachenjela  (ZAM)11.03
6.Flag of Sierra Leone.svg  John Carew  (SLE)11.11
7.Flag of the Seychelles (1977-1996).svg  Marc Larose  (SEY)11.27


RANKHEAT 2TIME
1.Olympic flag.svg  Pietro Mennea  (ITA)10.56
2.Flag of Greece.svg  Lambros Kefalas  (GRE)10.70
3.Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Katsuhiko Nakaya  (BRA)10.72
4.Flag of Senegal.svg  Momar N'Dao  (SEN)10.73
5.Flag of Mozambique (1975-1983).svg  Eduardo Costa  (MOZ)11.02
6.Flag of Botswana.svg  Lucien Josiah  (BOT)11.15
7.Flag of Laos.svg  Soutsakhone Somninhom  (LAO)11.69


RANKHEAT 3TIME
1.Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Aleksandr Aksinin  (URS)10.26
2.Flag of Poland.svg  Leszek Dunecki  (POL)10.42
3.Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Nelson dos Santos  (BRA)10.51
4.Flag of Nigeria.svg  Hammed Adio  (NGR)10.58
5.Flag of Syria (1972-1980).svg  Nabil Nahri  (SYR)10.67
6.Flag of Tanzania.svg  Mwalimu Ally  (TAN)10.86
7.Flag of Sierra Leone.svg  Rudolph George  (SLE)11.37


RANKHEAT 4TIME
1.Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Petar Petrov  (BUL)10.32
2.Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Vladimir Muravyov  (URS)10.37
3.Flag of Cuba.svg  Osvaldo Lara  (CUB)10.39
4.Olympic flag.svg  Antoine Richard  (FRA)10.51
5.Flag of Benin (1975-1990).svg  Pascal Aho  (BEN)11.01
6.Flag of Lesotho (1966).svg  Joseph Letseka  (LES)11.21
7.Flag of Angola.svg  Ilídio Coelho  (ANG)11.42
8.Flag of Ethiopia (1975-1987).svg  Besha Tuffa  (ETH)11.55


RANKHEAT 5TIME
1.Flag of East Germany.svg  Eugen Ray  (GDR)10.38
2.Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Hasely Crawford  (TRI)10.42
3.Olympic flag.svg  Drew McMaster  (GBR)10.43
4.Flag of the Dominican Republic.svg  Gerardo Suero  (DOM)10.53
5.Flag of Lebanon.svg  Roland Dagher  (LIB)11.01
6.Flag of Sierra Leone.svg  Sheku Boima  (SLE)11.08
7.Flag of Nepal.svg  Raghu Raj Onta  (NEP)11.61


RANKHEAT 6TIME
1.Flag of East Germany.svg  Sören Schlegel  (GDR)10.44
2.Olympic flag.svg  Hermann Panzo  (FRA)10.53
3.Flag of Cuba.svg  Tomás González  (CUB)10.65
4.Flag of the People's Republic of Congo.svg  Antoine Kiakouama  (CGO)10.69
5.Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Milton de Castro  (BRA)10.74
6.Flag of Senegal.svg  Boubacar Diallo  (SEN)10.75
7.Flag of India.svg  Adille Sumariwalla  (IND)11.04


RANKHEAT 7TIME
1.Olympic flag.svg  Allan Wells  (GBR)10.35
2.Flag of Jamaica.svg  Don Quarrie  (JAM)10.37
3.Flag of Poland.svg  Krzysztof Zwoliński  (POL)10.60
4.Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Ivaylo Karanyotov  (BUL)10.66
5.Flag of Hungary.svg  István Tatár  (HUN)10.69
6.Olympic flag.svg  Mario Westbroek  (NED)10.91
7.Flag of Iceland.svg  Oddur Sigurðsson  (ISL)10.94


RANKHEAT 8TIME
1.Flag of Guyana.svg  James Gilkes  (GUY)10.34
2.Olympic flag.svg  Cameron Sharp  (GBR)10.38
3.Flag of the People's Republic of Congo.svg  Théophile Nkounkou  (CGO)10.53
4.Flag of Hungary.svg  István Nagy  (HUN)10.68
5.Flag of Tanzania.svg  David Lukuba  (TAN)10.74
6.Flag of Guinea.svg  Paul Haba  (GUI)11.19
7.Flag of Kuwait.svg  Abdul Majeed Al-Mosawi  (KUW)11.28


RANKHEAT 9TIME
1.Flag of Cameroon.svg  Grégoire Illorson  (CMR)10.34
2.Flag of Poland.svg  Marian Woronin  (POL)10.35
3.Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Andrey Shlyapnikov  (URS)10.43
4.Flag of Nigeria.svg  Samson Oyeledun  (NGR)10.59
5.Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Francis Adams  (TRI)10.80
6.Flag of Tanzania.svg  Peter Mwita  (TAN)11.07
7.Flag of Mali.svg  Salif Koné  (MLI)11.07
8.Flag of Peru.svg  José Luis Elias  (PER)13.66

Quarterfinals

RANKHEAT 1TIME
1.Olympic flag.svg  Allan Wells  (GBR)10.11
2.Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Petar Petrov  (BUL)10.13
3.Flag of Cuba.svg  Osvaldo Lara  (CUB)10.21
4.Olympic flag.svg  Pietro Mennea  (ITA)10.27
5.Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Hasely Crawford  (TRI)10.28
6.Flag of East Germany.svg  Sören Schlegel  (GDR)10.28
7.Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Nelson dos Santos  (BRA)10.45
8.Flag of Greece.svg  Lambros Kefalas  (GRE)10.62


RANKHEAT 2TIME
1.Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Aleksandr Aksinin  (URS)10.29
2.Flag of Jamaica.svg  Don Quarrie  (JAM)10.29
3.Olympic flag.svg  Hermann Panzo  (FRA)10.29
4.Flag of Nigeria.svg  Peter Okodogbe  (NGR)10.34
5.Flag of Poland.svg  Leszek Dunecki  (POL)10.40
6.Olympic flag.svg  Drew McMaster  (GBR)10.42
7.Flag of Cuba.svg  Tomás González  (CUB)10.44
8.Flag of the Dominican Republic.svg  Gerardo Suero  (DOM)10.57


RANKHEAT 3TIME
1.Flag of Cuba.svg  Silvio Leonard  (CUB)10.16
2.Flag of Poland.svg  Marian Woronin  (POL)10.27
3.Flag of East Germany.svg  Eugen Ray  (GDR)10.30
4.Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Christopher Brathwaite  (TRI)10.37
5.Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Andrei Shlyapnikov  (URS)10.41
6.Flag of the People's Republic of Congo.svg  Théophile Nkounkou  (CGO)10.59
7.Flag of Nigeria.svg  Hammed Adio  (NGR)10.67
8.Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Katsuhiko Nakaya  (BRA)10.70


RANKHEAT 4TIME
1.Flag of Guyana.svg  James Gilkes  (GUY)10.26
2.Flag of Cameroon.svg  Grégoire Illorson  (CMR)10.29
3.Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Vladimir Muravyov  (URS)10.34
4.Olympic flag.svg  Cameron Sharp  (GBR)10.38
5.Olympic flag.svg  Antoine Richard  (FRA)10.45
6.Flag of East Germany.svg  Klaus-Dieter Kurrat  (GDR)10.54
7.Flag of Poland.svg  Krzysztof Zwoliński  (POL)10.54
8.Flag of Nigeria.svg  Samson Oyeledun  (NGR)10.73

Semifinals

RANKHEAT 1TIME
1.Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Petar Petrov  (BUL)10.39
2.Flag of Cuba.svg  Silvio Leonard  (CUB)10.40
3.Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Aleksandr Aksinin  (URS)10.45
4.Olympic flag.svg  Hermann Panzo  (FRA)10.45
5.Flag of Jamaica.svg  Don Quarrie  (JAM)10.55
6.Olympic flag.svg  Pietro Mennea  (ITA)10.58
7.Olympic flag.svg  Cameron Sharp  (GBR)10.60
8.Flag of Cameroon.svg  Grégoire Illorson  (CMR)10.60


RANKHEAT 2TIME
1.Olympic flag.svg  Allan Wells  (GBR)10.27
2.Flag of Cuba.svg  Osvaldo Lara  (CUB)10.34
3.Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Vladimir Muravyov  (URS)10.42
4.Flag of Poland.svg  Marian Woronin  (POL)10.43
5.Flag of Guyana.svg  James Gilkes  (GUY)10.44
6.Flag of East Germany.svg  Eugen Ray  (GDR)10.47
7.Flag of Nigeria.svg  Peter Okodogbe  (NGR)10.51
8.Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Christopher Brathwaite  (TRI)10.54

Final

RANKFINALTIME
Gold medal icon.svgOlympic flag.svg  Allan Wells  (GBR)10.25
Silver medal icon.svgFlag of Cuba.svg  Silvio Leonard  (CUB)10.25
Bronze medal icon.svgFlag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg  Petar Petrov  (BUL)10.39
4.Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Aleksandr Aksinin  (URS)10.42
5.Flag of Cuba.svg  Osvaldo Lara  (CUB)10.43
6.Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Vladimir Muravyov  (URS)10.44
7.Flag of Poland.svg  Marian Woronin  (POL)10.46
8.Olympic flag.svg  Hermann Panzo  (FRA)10.49

See also

Related Research Articles

The men's 100 metres was of one of 23 track events of the athletics at the 2004 Summer Olympics, in Athens. It was contested at the Athens Olympic Stadium, from August 21 to 22, by a total of 84 sprinters from 63 nations.

The women's 100 metres at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 20 to 21.

The women's 200 metres at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 24 to 26.

Athletics at the 1928 Summer Olympics – Mens 100 metres

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1928 Summer Olympics in Amsterdam, Netherlands, were held at the Olympic Stadium on Sunday, 29 July and Monday, 30 July. Eighty-one runners entered, though ultimately seventy-six runners from 32 nations competed. NOCs were limited to 4 competitors each. The event was won by Percy Williams of Canada, taking the nation's first men's 100 metres gold medal. Jack London of Great Britain took silver, marking the third consecutive Games that Great Britain had a medalist in the event. Georg Lammers won bronze, Germany's first medal in the event since 1896. For the first time in modern Olympic history, the United States won no medals in the event.

The men's 100 meters at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea saw world champion Ben Johnson of Canada defeat defending Olympic champion Carl Lewis of the United States in a world record time of 9.79, breaking his own record of 9.83 that he had set at the 1987 World Championships in Rome. Two days later, Johnson was stripped of his gold medal by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) after he tested positive for stanozolol, and his record of 9.79 seconds was deleted. The gold medal was then awarded to the original silver medalist Lewis, who had run 9.92. On 30 September 1989, following Johnson's admission to steroid use between 1981 and 1988, the IAAF rescinded his world record of 9.83 from the 1987 World Championship Final and stripped Johnson of his World Championship gold medal, which was also awarded to Lewis, who initially finished second. This made Lewis the first man to repeat as Olympic champion in the 100 metres.

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia, was held at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on 23 and 24 November. Sixty-five athletes from 31 nations competed; each nation was limited to three athletes. The final was won by American Bobby Morrow, marking the fifth consecutive victory by a different American. Hec Hogan of Australia won that country's first medal in the event since 1900. The competition took place in strong winds, with the final run into a 2.5 m/s (5.6 mph) headwind.

The men's 100 metres event was part of the athletics programme at the 1920 Summer Olympics. The competition was held on August 15 and 16, 1920. The event was won by Charley Paddock of the United States. Great Britain won its first medal in the event, a bronze by Harry Edward.

The men's 100 metres was an event at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain. There were a total number of 81 participating athletes from 66 nations, with ten qualifying heats. Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress.

These are the official results of the men's 100 metres event at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta. There were a total number of 106 participating athletes from 75 nations, with twelve heats in round 1, five quarterfinals, two semifinals and a final. Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by Donovan Bailey of Canada, the nation's first title in the event since Percy Williams won it in 1928.

The men's 100 metres event was part of the track and field athletics programme at the 1924 Summer Olympics. This race was depicted in the film Chariots of Fire. The first two rounds were held on 6 July, with the semifinals and final on 7 July. Eighty-six sprinters from 34 countries competed. The event was won by Harold Abrahams of Great Britain—Great Britain's first Olympic gold medal in the men's 100 metres and only the second time that the United States failed to win. Jackson Scholz kept the Americans on the podium with a silver. Arthur Porritt won the bronze, New Zealand's first medal in the event.

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, California, United States, were held at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on July 31 and August 1. Thirty-three runners from 17 nations competed. The 1930 Olympic Congress in Berlin had reduced the limit from 4 athletes per NOC to 3 athletes.

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin, Germany, were held at Olympiastadion on 2 and 3 August. The final was won by American Jesse Owens, and teammate Ralph Metcalfe repeated as silver medalist. Tinus Osendarp of the Netherlands won that nation's first medal in the men's 100 metres, a bronze.

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, was held at Olympic Stadium on July 23 and 24. Sixty-three athletes from 40 nations competed. Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by Hasely Crawford of Trinidad and Tobago, earning the nation's first gold medal and making Crawford a national hero. Don Quarrie's silver medal made Jamaica only the third country to reach the men's 100 metres podium three consecutive times. Valeriy Borzov of the Soviet Union was unable to defend his title, but by taking bronze became the third man to medal twice in the event. For only the second time, the United States did not have a medalist in the event.

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1948 Olympic Games in London, England, we held at Wembley Stadium on 30 and 31 July. Sixty-three athletes from 33 nations competed; each nation was limited to 3 runners by rules set at the 1930 Olympic Congress. The final was won by American Harrison Dillard, in a photo finish. Lloyd LaBeach of Panama won his nation's first medal in the men's 100 metres, a bronze. This was the first time a photo finish camera was used at an Olympic Games. The photo finish equipment consisted of a photoelectric cell, called the Magic Eye, produced by Swiss watchmaker Omega and a slit photography camera produced by the British Race Finish Recording Company.

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1952 Olympic Games in Helsinki, Finland was held at the Olympic Stadium on 20 and 21 July. Seventy-two athletes from 33 nations competed; each nation was limited to 3 runners. The final was won by American Lindy Remigino, the fourth consecutive victory by a different American. Herb McKenley won Jamaica's first medal in the men's 100 metres with his silver, while McDonald Bailey's bronze put Great Britain on the podium for the first time since 1928. The final was "probably the closest mass finish in Olympic 100 metre history" with the first four runners all clocking in at 10.4 seconds hand-timed, all six finalists within 0.12 seconds electric-timed, and a photo finish necessary to separate the winners.

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1968 Olympic Games took place at Estadio Olímpico Universitario in Mexico City, Mexico, on October 13 and 14. Sixty-five athletes from 42 nations took part. Each nation was limited to 3 runners by rules in place since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The final was won by American Jim Hines, the second consecutive time the event was won by an American. Jamaica won its first medal in the event since 1952.

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, West Germany, was held at Olympiastadion on 31 August and 1 September. Eighty-five athletes from 55 nations competed. Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by Valeriy Borzov of the Soviet Union, the first medal in the men's 100 metres for that nation. Jamaican Lennox Miller, silver medalist four years earlier, became the second man to make the podium twice in the event by taking bronze.

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1984 Olympic Games took place between August 3 and August 4. Eighty-two athletes from 59 countries participated. Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by Carl Lewis of the United States, that nation's first title after two Games of missing the podium. Canada's Ben Johnson took bronze to break up the Americans' bid to sweep the podium ; it was Canada's first medal in the event since 1964.

Grenada at the 2012 Summer Olympics

Grenada competed at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, United Kingdom from 27 July to 12 August 2012. This was the nation's eighth consecutive appearance at the Olympics. Few weeks before the Games, Grenadian athletes trained at Broadbridge Heath Leisure Centre near Horsham, West Sussex.

4 × 100 metres relay at the Olympics

The 4 × 100 metres relay at the Summer Olympics is the shortest track relay event held at the multi-sport event. The men's relay has been present on the Olympic athletics programme since 1912 and the women's event has been continuously held since the 1928 Olympic Games in Amsterdam. It is the most prestigious 4×100 m relay race at elite level.

References

  1. "Athletics at the 1980 Moscow Summer Games: Men's 100 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 3 July 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  3. Official Report, vol. 3, p. 25.