Athletics at the 1984 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

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Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the XXIII Olympiad
Venue Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum
DatesAugust 3 (heats and quarterfinals)
August 4 (semifinals and final)
Competitors82 from 59 nations
Winning time9.99
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Carl Lewis
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Silver medal icon.svg Sam Graddy
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Bronze medal icon.svg Ben Johnson
Flag of Canada.svg  Canada
  1980
1988  
Official Video Highlights TV-icon-2.svg
Official Video Highlights

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1984 Olympic Games took place between August 3 and August 4. [1] Eighty-two athletes from 59 countries participated. [2] Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by Carl Lewis of the United States, that nation's first title after two Games of missing the podium (4th in 1976, boycotted in 1980). Canada's Ben Johnson took bronze to break up the Americans' bid to sweep the podium (which they had done in 1904 and 1912); it was Canada's first medal in the event since 1964.

Contents

Background

This was the twentieth time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. Defending gold medal winner Allan Wells of Great Britain was the only finalist from the Moscow Games to return. The American team was strong, led by 1983 World Championships in Athletics winner Carl Lewis, who was attempting to match Jesse Owens's 1936 quadruple (100, 200, 4x100, and long jump). Sam Graddy and Ron Brown were the other members of the United States squad, edging out world record holder and World Championships runner-up Calvin Smith. Challengers to the hosts included World Championship finalists Wells, Paul Narracott of Australia, Christian Haas of West Germany, and Desai Williams of Canada, as well as up-and-coming Canadian sprinter Ben Johnson. [2]

Thirteen nations appeared in the event for the first time: Antigua and Barbuda, Bangladesh, the British Virgin Islands, China (in its People's Republic form), Costa Rica, Equatorial Guinea, The Gambia, Mauritius, Oman, Qatar, the Solomon Islands, Swaziland, and the United Arab Emirates. The United States made its 19th appearance in the event, most of any country, having missed only the boycotted 1980 Games.

Competition format

The event retained the same basic four round format introduced in 1920: heats, quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. The "fastest loser" system, introduced in 1968, was used again to ensure that the quarterfinals and subsequent rounds had exactly 8 runners per heat; this time, the system was used in both the preliminaries and quarterfinals.

The first round consisted of 11 heats, each with 7 or 8 athletes. The top three runners in each heat advanced, along with the next seven fastest runners overall. This made 40 quarterfinalists, who were divided into 5 heats of 8 runners. The top three runners in each quarterfinal advanced, with one "fastest loser" place. The 16 semifinalists competed in two heats of 8, with the top four in each semifinal advancing to the eight-man final. [2] [3]

Records

These are the standing world and Olympic records (in seconds) prior to the 1980 Summer Olympics.

World Record9.93 Flag of the United States.svg Calvin Smith Colorado Springs (United States)July 3, 1983
Olympic Record9.95 Flag of the United States.svg Jim Hines Mexico City (Mexico)October 14, 1968

Results

Heats

The top three runners in each of the eleven heats and the next seven fastest, advanced to the quarterfinal round.

Heat 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Carl Lewis Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.32Q
2 Tony Sharpe Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.38Q
3 Mike McFarlane Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.47Q
4 Hasely Crawford Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.48q
5 Peter Van Miltenburg Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.55q
6 Vicente Daniel Flag of Mozambique.svg  Mozambique 10.81
7 Henry Ngolwe Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia 10.94
8 Paul Réneau Flag of Belize (1981-2019).svg  Belize 10.96

Heat 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Allan Wells Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.32Q
2 Mohamed Purnomo Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia 10.40Q
3 José Javier Arqués Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 10.42Q
4 Marc Gasparoni Flag of France.svg  France 10.47q
5 Emilio Samayoa Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala 10.84
6 Barnabé Messomo Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 10.98
7 Charles Mbazira Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 11.03
8 Mohamed Abdullah Flag of the United Arab Emirates.svg  United Arab Emirates 11.11

Heat 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Desai Williams Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.35Q
2 Chidi Imoh Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.39Q
3 Charles-Louis Seck Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 10.45Q
4 Christian Nenepath Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia 10.66
Henri Ndinga Flag of the People's Republic of Congo.svg  Republic of the Congo 10.66
6 Abdullah Sulaiman Al-Akbary Flag of Oman (1970-1995).svg  Oman 10.86
7 Inoke Bainimoli Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 11.15
8 Daniel André Flag of Mauritius.svg  Mauritius 11.19

Heat 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Sumet Promna Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 10.52Q
2 Paul Narracott Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.55Q
3 Neville Hodge Flag of the United States Virgin Islands.svg  Virgin Islands 10.58Q
4 Audrick Lightbourne Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 10.64
5 Gus Young Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.64
6 Bill Trott Flag of Bermuda (1910-1999).svg  Bermuda 10.76
7 Kgosiemang Khumoyarano Flag of Botswana.svg  Botswana 11.49

Heat 5

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Sam Graddy Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.29Q
2 Donovan Reid Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.41Q
3 Jürgen Evers Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 10.54Q
4 Hiroki Fuwa Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.56
5 Philip Attipoe Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.60
6 Jean-Yves Mallat Flag of Lebanon.svg  Lebanon 10.83
7 Markus Büchel Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein 10.98
8 Clifford Mamba Flag of Swaziland.svg  Swaziland 11.24

Heat 6

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ray Stewart Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.24Q
2 Antoine Richard Flag of France.svg  France 10.35Q
3 Antonio Ullo Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10.36Q
4 Paulo Roberto Correia Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.45q
5 Anthony Jones Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 10.69
6 Oliver Daniels Flag of Liberia.svg  Liberia 10.76
7 Muhammad Mansha Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 10.87

Heat 7

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ben Johnson Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.35Q
2 Yu Zhuanghui Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 10.53Q
3 Bruno Marie-Rose Flag of France.svg  France 10.59Q
4 Earl Haley Flag of Guyana.svg  Guyana 10.74
5 Julien Thode Flag of the Netherlands Antilles (1986-2010).svg  Netherlands Antilles 10.92
6 Ronald Russell Flag of the United States Virgin Islands.svg  Virgin Islands 11.02
7 Denis Rose Flag of the Seychelles (1977-1996).svg  Seychelles 11.04

Heat 8

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ronald Desruelles Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 10.46Q
2 Stefano Tilli Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10.48Q
3 Fred Martin Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.64Q
4 Luís Barroso Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 10.76
5 Gustavo Envela Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea 10.79
6 Oumar Fye Flag of The Gambia.svg  The Gambia 10.87
7 Anthony Henry Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg  Antigua and Barbuda 10.99
8 Saidur Rahman Dawn Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 11.25

Heat 9

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ron Brown Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.58Q
2 Luis Morales Flag of Puerto Rico (1952-1995).svg  Puerto Rico 10.60Q
3 Nelson dos Santos Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.70Q
4 Ralf Lübke Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 10.70
5 Collins Mensah Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.92
6 Ivan Benjamin Flag of Sierra Leone.svg  Sierra Leone 11.13
7 Johnson Kere Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg  Solomon Islands 11.57

Heat 10

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Norman Edwards Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.57Q
2 Dudley Parker Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 10.65Q
3 Kouadio Otokpa Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 10.72Q
4 Pierfrancesco Pavoni Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10.72
5 Faraj Saad Marzouk Flag of Qatar.svg  Qatar 10.78
6 Odiya Silweya Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi 11.22
7 Glen Abrahams Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 11.31

Heat 11

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Christian Haas Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 10.41Q
2 Alfonso Pitters Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 10.50Q
3 Katsuhiko Nakaya Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.55Q
4 Bakary Jarjue Flag of The Gambia.svg  The Gambia 10.68
5 Sim Deok-seop Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg  South Korea 10.72
6 Guy Hill Flag of the British Virgin Islands.svg  British Virgin Islands 11.11
7 Aldo Salandra Flag of El Salvador.svg  El Salvador 11.31

Quarterfinals

The top three runners in each of the five heats and the next fastest one, advanced to the semifinal round.

Quarterfinal 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ben Johnson Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.41Q
2 Donovan Reid Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.47Q
3 Christian Haas Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 10.51Q
4 Hasely Crawford Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.56
5 Antonio Ullo Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10.57
6 Bruno Marie-Rose Flag of France.svg  France 10.60
7 Paul Narracott Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.60
8 Alfonso Pitters Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 10.63

Quarterfinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Sam Graddy Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.15Q
2 Tony Sharpe Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.33Q
3 Norman Edwards Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.44Q
4 Nelson dos Santos Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.53
5 Charles-Louis Seck Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 10.54
6 Yu Zhuanghui Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 10.59
7 Neville Hodge Flag of the United States Virgin Islands.svg  Virgin Islands 10.69
Ronald Desruelles Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium DNS

Quarterfinal 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Stefano Tilli Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10.39Q
2 Ron Brown Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.40Q
3 Marc Gasparoni Flag of France.svg  France 10.56Q
4 Sumet Promna Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 10.61
5 Katsuhiko Nakaya Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.69
6 Hiroki Fuwa Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.75
7 Philip Attipoe Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.78
8 Kouadio Otokpa Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 10.80

Quarterfinal 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ray Stewart Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.30Q
2 Allan Wells Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.33Q
3 Mohamed Purnomo Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia 10.43Q
4 José Javier Arqués Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 10.52
Peter Van Miltenburg Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.52
6 Antoine Richard Flag of France.svg  France 10.53
7 Paulo Roberto Correia Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.54
8 Audrick Lightbourne Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 10.59

Quarterfinal 5

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Carl Lewis Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.04Q
2 Desai Williams Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.27Q
3 Luis Morales Flag of Puerto Rico (1952-1995).svg  Puerto Rico 10.35Q
4 Mike McFarlane Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.36q
5 Chidi Imoh Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.42
6 Dudley Parker Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 10.58
7 Fred Martin Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.61
8 Jürgen Evers Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 10.69

Semifinals

The top four runners in each of the two heats advanced to the final round.

Semifinal 1

The wind was +0.7 m/s.

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ray Stewart Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.26Q
2 Sam Graddy Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.27Q
3 Donovan Reid Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.32Q
4 Ron Brown Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.34Q
5 Desai Williams Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.34
6 Christian Haas Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 10.41
7 Marc Gasparoni Flag of France.svg  France 10.49
8 Mohamed Purnomo Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia 10.51

Semifinal 2

The wind was -1.5 m/s.

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Carl Lewis Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.14Q
2 Ben Johnson Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.42Q
3 Mike McFarlane Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.45Q
4 Tony Sharpe Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.52Q
5 Luis Morales Flag of Puerto Rico (1952-1995).svg  Puerto Rico 10.54
6 Stefano Tilli Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10.55
7 Norman Edwards Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.63
8 Allan Wells Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.71

Final

Wind = 0.2 m/s

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg Carl Lewis Flag of the United States.svg  United States 9.99
Silver medal icon.svg Sam Graddy Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.19
Bronze medal icon.svg Ben Johnson Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.22
4 Ron Brown Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.26
5 Mike McFarlane Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.27
6 Ray Stewart Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.29
7 Donovan Reid Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.33
8 Tony Sharpe Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.35

See also

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References

  1. "Athletics at the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Games: Men's 100 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 4 July 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  3. Official Report, vol. 2, pp. 270–71.