Crimp (joining)

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Crimping is joining two or more pieces of metal or other ductile material by deforming one or both of them to hold the other. The bend or deformity is called the crimp.

Metal element, compound, or alloy that is a good conductor of both electricity and heat

A metal is a material that, when freshly prepared, polished, or fractured, shows a lustrous appearance, and conducts electricity and heat relatively well. Metals are typically malleable or ductile. A metal may be a chemical element such as iron, or an alloy such as stainless steel.

Ductility

Ductility is a measure of a material's ability to undergo significant plastic deformation before rupture, which may be expressed as percent elongation or percent area reduction from a tensile test. According to Shigley's Mechanical Engineering Design significant denotes about 5.0 percent elongation. See also Eq. 2–12, p. 50 for definitions of percent elongation and percent area reduction. Ductility is often characterized by a material's ability to be stretched into a wire.

Contents

Crimp tool for 0.14 mm to 10.00 mm insulated and non-insulated ferrules Crimp Tool For Bootlace Ferrules.jpg
Crimp tool for 0.14 mm to 10.00 mm insulated and non-insulated ferrules
F connectors crimped on to coaxial cable. The bottom middle cable is missing its crimping collar. Commutateur-diseqc4x1-switch.jpg
F connectors crimped on to coaxial cable. The bottom middle cable is missing its crimping collar.

Wire connectors

The metals are joined together via a special connector. Stripped wire (often stranded) is inserted through the correctly sized opening of the connector, and a crimper is used to tightly squeeze the opening against the wire. Depending on the type of connector used, it may be attached to a metal plate by a separate screw or bolt or it could be simply screwed on using the connector itself to make the attachment like an F connector.

F connector

The F connector is a coaxial RF connector commonly used for "over the air" terrestrial television, cable television and universally for satellite television and cable modems, usually with RG-6/U cable or, in older installations, with RG-59/U cable.

Uses

Crimping is most extensively used in metalworking. Crimping is commonly used to fix bullets in their cartridge cases, for rapid but lasting electrical connections, securing lids on metal food cans, and many other applications. Because it can be a cold-working technique, crimping can also be used to form a strong bond between the workpiece and a non-metallic component.

Metalworking production and processing of shaped workpieces made of metals

Metalworking is the process of working with metals to create individual parts, assemblies, or large-scale structures. The term covers a wide range of work from large ships and bridges to precise engine parts and delicate jewelry. It therefore includes a correspondingly wide range of skills, processes, and tools.

Bullet projectile propelled by a firearm, sling, or air gun

A bullet is a kinetic projectile and the component of firearm ammunition that is expelled from the gun barrel during shooting. The term is from Middle French and originated as the diminutive of the word boulle (boullet), which means "small ball". Bullets are made of a variety of materials such as copper, lead, steel, polymer, rubber and even wax. They are available either singly as in muzzleloading and cap and ball firearms or as a component of paper cartridges, but much more commonly in the form of metallic cartridges. Bullets are made in a large number of shapes and constructions depending on the intended applications, including specialized functions such as hunting, target shooting, training and combat.

Canning food preservation process

Canning is a method of preserving food in which the food contents are processed and sealed in an airtight container. Canning provides a shelf life typically ranging from one to five years, although under specific circumstances it can be much longer. A freeze-dried canned product, such as canned dried lentils, could last as long as 30 years in an edible state. In 1974, samples of canned food from the wreck of the Bertrand, a steamboat that sank in the Missouri River in 1865, were tested by the National Food Processors Association. Although appearance, smell and vitamin content had deteriorated, there was no trace of microbial growth and the 109-year-old food was determined to be still safe to eat.

When joining segments of tubular sheet metal pipe, such as for smoke pipes for wood stoves, downspouts for rain gutters, or for installation of ventilation ducting, one end of a tube is treated with a crimping tool to make a slip joint into the next section of duct. The joint will not be liquid-tight but will be adequate for conveying low pressure fluids. Crimp joints may be arranged to prevent accumulation of dirt.

In jewelry manufacture, crimp beads, or crimp tubes, are used to make secure joints in fine wire, such as used in clasps or tie loops. A crimped lead (or other soft metal) seal is attached to secure wires used to secure fasteners in aircraft, or to provide visual evidence of tampering when securing a utility meter or as a seal on cargo containers.

Crimped connectors on hydraulic hose. Crimped hose ends.JPG
Crimped connectors on hydraulic hose.

See also

Related Research Articles

Electrical connector electro-mechanical device

An electrical connector is an electro-mechanical device used to join electrical terminations and create an electrical circuit. Electrical connectors consist of plugs (male-ended) and jacks (female-ended). The connection may be temporary, as for portable equipment, require a tool for assembly and removal, or serve as a permanent electrical joint between two wires or devices. An adapter can be used to effectively bring together dissimilar connectors.

Ferrule Wikimedia disambiguation page

A ferrule is any of a number of types of objects, generally used for fastening, joining, sealing or reinforcement. They are often narrow circular rings made from metal, or less commonly, plastic. Ferrules are also often referred to as eyelets or grommets within the manufacturing industry.

D-subminiature type of electrical connector

The D-subminiature or D-sub is a common type of electrical connector. They are named for their characteristic D-shaped metal shield. When they were introduced, D-subs were among the smallest connectors used on computer systems.

Banana connector single-wire electrical connector used for joining wires to equipment

A banana connector is a single-wire electrical connector used for joining wires to equipment. The term 4 mm connector is also used, especially in Europe, although not all banana connectors will mate with 4 mm parts, and 2 mm banana connectors exist. Various styles of banana plug contacts exist, all based on the concept of spring metal applying outward force into the unsprung cylindrical jack to produce a snug fit with good electrical conductivity. Common types include: a solid pin split lengthwise and splayed slightly, a tip of four leaf springs, a cylinder with a single leaf spring on one side, a bundle of stiff wire, a central pin surrounded by a multiply-slit cylinder with a central bulge, or simple sheet spring metal rolled into a nearly complete cylinder. The plugs are frequently used to terminate patch cords for electronic test equipment, while sheathed banana plugs are common on multimeter probe leads.

Closure (container) devices and techniques used to close or seal a bottle, jug, jar, tube, can, etc.

Closures are devices and techniques used to close or seal container such as a bottle, jug, jar, tube, can, etc. Closures can be a cap, cover, lid, plug, etc.

Swaging is a forging process in which the dimensions of an item are altered using dies into which the item is forced. Swaging is usually a cold working process, but also may be hot worked.

Hose clamp

A hose clamp or hose clip or hose lock is a device used to attach and seal a hose onto a fitting such as a barb or nipple.

A hermetic seal is any type of sealing that makes a given object airtight. The term originally applied to airtight glass containers, but as technology advanced it applied to a larger category of materials, including rubber and plastics. Hermetic seals are essential to the correct and safe functionality of many electronic and healthcare products. Used technically, it is stated in conjunction with a specific test method and conditions of use.

Strapping, also known as bundling and banding, is the process of applying a strap to an item to combine, stabilize, hold, reinforce, or fasten it. The strap may also be referred to as strapping. Strapping is most commonly used in the packaging industry.

Twist-on wire connector

Twist-on wire connectors are a type of electrical connector used to fasten two or more low-voltage electrical conductors. They are widely used in North America in residential, commercial and industrial building power wiring.

Electrogas welding (EGW) is a continuous vertical position arc welding process developed in 1961, in which an arc is struck between a consumable electrode and the workpiece. A shielding gas is sometimes used, but pressure is not applied. A major difference between EGW and its cousin electroslag welding is that the arc in EGW is not extinguished, instead remains struck throughout the welding process. It is used to make square-groove welds for butt and t-joints, especially in the shipbuilding industry and in the construction of storage tanks.

Piping and plumbing fitting piece that fits or connects pipes and tubes; used in pipe systems to connect straight pipe or tubing sections, adapt to different sizes or shapes and for other purposes

A fitting is used in pipe systems to connect the straight pipe or tubing sections, adapt to different sizes or shapes and for other purposes, such as regulating fluid flow. "Plumbing" is generally used to describe the conveyance of water, gas, or liquid waste in domestic or commercial environments; "piping" is often used to describe the high-performance conveyance of fluids in specialized applications. "Tubing" is sometimes used for lighter-weight piping, especially that flexible enough to be supplied in coiled form.

Ground glass joint

Ground glass joints are used in laboratories to quickly and easily fit leak-tight apparatus together from commonly available parts. For example, a round bottom flask, Liebig condenser, and oil bubbler with ground glass joints may be rapidly fitted together to reflux a reaction mixture. This is a large improvement compared with older methods of custom-made glassware, which was time-consuming and expensive, or the use of less chemical resistant and heat resistant corks or rubber bungs and glass tubes as joints, which took time to prepare as well.

TO-3

In electronics, TO-3 is a designation for a standardized metal semiconductor package used for power semiconductors, including transistors, silicon controlled rectifiers, and, integrated circuits. TO stands for "Transistor Outline" and relates to a series of technical drawings produced by JEDEC.

Screw terminal

A screw terminal is a type of electrical connector where a wire is held by the tightening of a screw.

Crimp (electrical)

An electrical crimp is a type of solderless electrical connection.

Circular connector

The term Circular Connector applies to any electrical connector possessing multipin interconnects with cylindrical contact housings and circular contact interface geometries. Circular connectors are selected for ease of engagement and disengagement, their ability to conveniently house different types of contacts, their wide range of allowable contact voltages and currents, their ease of environmental sealing and their rugged mechanical performance. In military, aerospace, and other high-reliability applications, the MIL-DTL-5015 and MIL-DTL-38999 are among the most commonly specified types. The primary disadvantage of the circular design is loss of panel space when used in arrays when compared to rectangular connectors.

Electrical conduit

An electrical conduit is a tube used to protect and route electrical wiring in a building or structure. Electrical conduit may be made of metal, plastic, fiber, or fired clay. Most conduit is rigid, but flexible conduit is used for some purposes.

Electric wire ferrule

An electric wire ferrule is a metal tube crimped over stranded wire to secure the strands within a screw terminal. Electrical insulation may be included to protect any exposed portion of the wire not completely inside the screw terminal post.

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