Czechoslovak First Ice Hockey League

Last updated
Czechoslovak First Ice Hockey League
Sport Ice hockey
Founded1936
Ceased1993 (reorganized as
Czech Extraliga and
Slovak Extraliga)
No. of teams8–24
CountryFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
Last
champion(s)
HC Sparta Praha
(1992–93)
Most titles HC Dukla Jihlava (12 titles)

The Czechoslovak First Ice Hockey League was the elite ice hockey league in Czechoslovakia from 1936 until 1993, when the country split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia. [1] The Slovak Extraliga and Czech Extraliga formed from the split.

Contents

History

The most successful team in the number of titles was HC Dukla Jihlava with 12 titles. HC Sparta Praha won the last season 1992–93, when they defeated HC Vítkovice 4–0 in the final for matches. [2]

Champions

Notable officials

Paul Loicq Award recipient Juraj Okoličány worked 15 seasons in the league, and made his officiating debut at age 19. [3]

See also

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The 1996–97 Czech Extraliga season was the fourth season of the Czech Extraliga since its creation after the breakup of Czechoslovakia and the Czechoslovak First Ice Hockey League in 1993.

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The 1970–71 Czechoslovak Extraliga season was the 28th season of the Czechoslovak Extraliga, the top level of ice hockey in Czechoslovakia. 10 teams participated in the league, and Dukla Jihlava won the championship.

The 1985–86 Czechoslovak Extraliga season was the 43rd season of the Czechoslovak Extraliga, the top level of ice hockey in Czechoslovakia. 12 teams participated in the league, and VSZ Kosice won the championship.

The 1986–87 Czechoslovak Extraliga season was the 44th season of the Czechoslovak Extraliga, the top level of ice hockey in Czechoslovakia. 12 teams participated in the league, and Tesla Pardubice won the championship.

The 1987–88 Czechoslovak Extraliga season was the 45th season of the Czechoslovak Extraliga, the top level of ice hockey in Czechoslovakia. 12 teams participated in the league, and VSZ Kosice won the championship.

The 1988–89 Czechoslovak Extraliga season was the 46th season of the Czechoslovak Extraliga, the top level of ice hockey in Czechoslovakia. 12 teams participated in the league, and VSZ Kosice won the championship.

The 1989–90 Czechoslovak Extraliga season was the 47th season of the Czechoslovak Extraliga, the top level of ice hockey in Czechoslovakia. 12 teams participated in the league, and Sparta CKD Prag won the championship.

The 1991–92 Czechoslovak Extraliga season was the 49th season of the Czechoslovak Extraliga, the top level of ice hockey in Czechoslovakia. 14 teams participated in the league, and Dukla Trencin won the championship.

The 1992–93 Czechoslovak Extraliga season was the 50th season of the Czechoslovak Extraliga, the top level of ice hockey in Czechoslovakia. 14 teams participated in the league, and HC Sparta Prag won the championship.

References

  1. Šimůnková, Karolína (2015). "Analysis of Ice Hockey League in the Czech Republic" (PDF). otik.zcu.cz. Retrieved 2019-05-16.
  2. "History of HC Sparta Praha". historie.hcsparta.cz (in Czech).
  3. Holko, Ján (2013). Príbeh hokejového rodu Okoličány (PDF) (in Slovak). Slovak Olympic Museum. p. 33. ISBN   978-80-970816-4-5.