Do Detectives Think?

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Do Detectives Think?
L&H Do Detectives Think 1927.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Fred Guiol
Written by Hal Roach
H.M. Walker (titles)
Produced byHal Roach
Starring Stan Laurel
Oliver Hardy
Distributed by Pathé Exchange
Release date
November 20, 1927
Running time
19 min.
CountryUnited States
Languages Silent film
English intertitles

Do Detectives Think? or The Bodyguard is a 1927 silent comedy short film starring Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy prior to their official billing as the duo Laurel and Hardy.

Contents

Production

Do Detectives Think? is most notable for featuring the comedians in their familiar garb of crumpled suits and bowler hats for the very first time, the standard costumes of detectives of the time.

Plot

A Judge (Finlayson) sentences a murderer, the Tipton Slasher (Noah Young), to death. The murderer vows revenge on the judge.

Following the escape of the condemned man, the judge engages a detective agency which sends its two least-skilled detectives (Laurel and Hardy) to protect him.

In a sequence that establishes their routine, their hats blow off and land in a cemetery. They are scared to retrieve them. Stan is scared of his own shadow, thinking it is another person. Meanwhile the Slasher is in the judge's house, taking on the role of a butler.

Hardy demonstrates his shooting skills to the judge, claiming his uncle was William Tell. He tries to shoot an apple from Laurel's head but destroys a nearby vase.

The judge's wife sees the butler with a huge knife and screams. He hides in a bedroom where Laurel and Hardy sit in bed together. The judge is having a bath. Laurel and Hardy overpower the Slasher but Hardy gets handcuffed instead of the Slasher.

The judge in a large white towel falls down he stairs and an odd mask jams on the back of his head. From the back he looks like a ghost and scares the Slasher. The police arrive and arrest the Slasher.

The sleuths, after many mishaps, manage to capture the murderer. [1]

Cast

Homages

Canadian musician Nash the Slash chose his stage name based on the character in Do Detectives Think. [2]

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References

  1. "Laurel and Hardy in Sugar Daddies". Laurelandhardycentral.com. Archived from the original on September 20, 2011. Retrieved August 13, 2012.
  2. Nash the Slash, at the Canadian Pop Music Encyclopedia , by Jaimie Vernon et al., published 2011; retrieved May 13, 2014

3. ^Do detectives think by Lordheath. Last updated on May 2, 2017.