The Second Hundred Years (film)

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The Second Hundred Years
L&H Second Hundred Years 1927.jpg
Theatrical poster
Directed by Fred Guiol
Written by Leo McCarey (story)
H.M. Walker (titles)
Produced by Hal Roach
Starring Stan Laurel
Oliver Hardy
Cinematography George Stevens
Edited by Richard C. Currier
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date
  • October 8, 1927 (1927-10-08)
Running time
20 minutes
CountryUnited States
Languages Silent
English intertitles

The Second Hundred Years (a.k.a. The Second 100 Years) is a 1927 American silent comedy short film starring Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy prior to their official billing as the duo Laurel and Hardy. The team appeared in a total of 107 films between 1921 and 1951.

Contents

Plot

Full Movie

Stan and Ollie play two convicts who share a cell. They dig a tunnel to escape from prison. After making a detour to avoid a burst underground water pipe, they emerge through the floor of the warden's office and are quickly sent back to the cell block after a short chase. Not long afterward, Stan and Ollie cleverly disguise themselves as painters and casually walk out through the prison's front gate during a meal break carrying paint cans and brushes. They are watched by a suspicious policeman, however. To keep the ruse going, they indiscriminately paint everything they see—including a parked car and its engine. After they accidentally paint the backside of a female passerby, the policeman pursues them. They climb into a limousine, eject the two backseat passengers, and steal their evening clothes. By happenstance, the men were two visiting French prison officials who were on their way to meet with the governor to learn about American prisons. Their chauffeur is unaware of the switch and he continues to his destination. Stan and Ollie assume the role of the French visitors and are taken to a banquet at the governor's home. While dining, Stan hilariously tries to corral a wayward cherry that has fallen from the top of his appetizer. When the banquet concludes, the governor escorts Stan and Ollie on a tour of the nearby prison. Their cell block comrades quickly recognize them—as do the real French dignitaries who are occupying Stan and Ollie's former cell in their underwear. After a brief chase, Stan and Ollie are marched back to their home behind bars.

Cast

Notes

The Sons of the Desert

Chapters — called Tents — of The Sons of the Desert, the international Laurel and Hardy Appreciation Society, all take their names from L&H films; there is a The Second Hundred Years Tent on Long Island, New York.

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References

  1. Solomon, Jon (2002). The Complete Three Stooges: The Official Filmography and Three Stooges Companion. Comedy III Productions, Inc. p. 187. ISBN   0971186804.