Earl of Norfolk

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Earl of Norfolk is a title which has been created several times in the Peerage of England. Created in 1070, the first major dynasty to hold the title was the 12th and 13th century Bigod family, and it then was later held by the Mowbrays, who were also made Dukes of Norfolk. Due to the Bigods' descent in the female line from William Marshal, they inherited the hereditary office of Earl Marshal, still held by the Dukes of Norfolk today. The present title was created in 1644 for Thomas Howard, 18th Earl of Arundel, the heir of the Howard Dukedom of Norfolk which had been forfeit in 1572. Arundel's grandson, the 20th Earl of Arundel and 3rd Earl of Norfolk, was restored to the Dukedom as 5th Duke upon the Restoration in 1660, and the title continues to be borne by the Dukes of Norfolk.

Contents

Earls of Norfolk (and Suffolk), first creation (1066/67)

Earls of Norfolk, second creation (1141)

Earls of Norfolk, third creation (1312)

Earls of Norfolk, fourth creation (1477)

Earls of Norfolk, fifth creation (1644)

For later Earls of Norfolk, see Duke of Norfolk.

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