Earl of Nottingham

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See also Earl of Winchilsea
Earldom of Nottingham
held with
Earldom of Winchilsea
Coronet of a British Earl.svg
Earl of Winchilsea Nottingham COA.svg
Arms of Finch-Hatton, Earl of Winchilsea and Earl of Nottingham Quarterly, 1st & 4th: argent, a chevron between three garbs gules; (Hatton) 2nd & 3rd, argent, a chevron between three griffins, passant, wings endorsed sable (Finch)
Creation date1377 (first creation)
1383 (second creation)
1476 (third creation)
1483 (fourth creation)
1525 (fifth creation)
1596 (sixth creation)
1681 (seventh creation)
Monarch Richard II (first and second creations)
Edward IV (third creation)
Edward V (fourth creation)
Henry VIII (fifth creation)
Elizabeth I (sixth creation)
Charles II (seventh creation)
Peerage Peerage of England
First holder John de Mowbray
Present holder Daniel Finch-Hatton, 17th Earl of Winchilsea, 12th Earl of Nottingham
Heir apparentTobias Finch-Hatton, Viscount Maidstone
Remainder tothe 1st Earl's heirs male whatsoever
Subsidiary titlesViscount Maidstone
Baron Finch of Daventry
Baronet of Eastwell
Baronet of Raunston
Extinction date1383 (first creation)
1476 (second creation)
1483 (third creation)
1492 (fourth creation)
1536 (fifth creation)
1681 (sixth creation)
Seat(s) Kirby Hall
Former seat(s) Eastwell Park
MottoNil conscire sibi ("Conscious of no evil"); Virtus tutissima cassis ("Virtue is the safest helmet")

Earl of Nottingham is a title that has been created seven times in the Peerage of England. It was first created for John de Mowbray in 1377, at the coronation of Richard II. As this creation could only pass to his legitimate heirs, it went extinct on his death in 1383. It was re-created for his elder brother Thomas de Mowbray in the same year, however. This branch of the family became Dukes of Norfolk, and the title would descend with them until John de Mowbray died without male heirs in 1476.

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The third creation was for Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York, son of Edward IV and one of the Princes in the Tower. Richard was imprisoned by his uncle Richard III (then Lord Protector), disappearing shortly after, presumed murdered.

The earldom was briefly recreated in 1483 for the 4th time for William Berkeley, who later became Marquess of Berkeley. Then in 1525, the earldom was recreated for the 5th time for Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond and Somerset and illegitimate son of Henry VIII. Both died childless within ten years of being granted the title.

The sixth creation was for Charles Howard, Lord High Admiral for Elizabeth I and James VI and I. He was commander of the English navy against the Spanish Armada, and a notable statesman in both reigns. His descendants held the earldom until 1681.

The current, seventh, creation was made in 1681 for Heneage Finch, 1st Earl of Nottingham, who died one year later. Before being created earl he was the Attorney General and Lord Chancellor, and played an active part in the aftermath of the Popish Plot. His son Daniel Finch inherited the Earldom of Winchilsea in 1729. The second earl was a prominent politician, serving as Lord President of the Council, Secretary of State for the Northern and Southern Departments, and First Lord of the Admiralty.

For subsequent family history, see Earl of Winchilsea and Nottingham.

The title is currently held by Daniel Finch-Hatton, 17th Earl of Winchilsea and 12th Earl of Nottingham.

Earls of Nottingham, First creation (1377)

Earls of Nottingham, Second creation (1383)

see the Duke of Norfolk (1397 creation) for the other Earls

Earl of Nottingham, Third creation (1476)

Earl of Nottingham, Fourth creation (1483)

Earl of Nottingham, Fifth creation (1525)

Earls of Nottingham, Sixth creation (1596)

Earls of Nottingham, Seventh creation (1681)

see the Earl of Winchilsea and Nottingham

Coat of Arms of Sir Thomas Mowbray, 1st Earl of Nottingham, KG.png
Arms of Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk and Earl of Nottingham
Arms of Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York.svg
Arms of Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York and Earl of Nottingham
Arms of Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Richmond and Somerset.svg
Arms of Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Richmond and Somerset and Earl of Nottingham
Coat of arms of Sir Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Nottingham, KG.png
Arms of Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Nottingham
Arms of the Earls of Nottingham

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