First Lord of the Admiralty

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First Lord of the Admiralty
Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (HM Government).svg
Department of the Admiralty
StatusAbolished
Member of Board of Admiralty
Cabinet
Reports to Prime Minister
NominatorPrime Minister
AppointerPrime Minister
Subject to formal approval by the King-in-Council
Term length Not fixed
typically 3–7 years
Formation1628
First holder Richard Weston, 1st Earl of Portland
Final holder George Jellicoe, 2nd Earl Jellicoe
Abolished1964
Superseded by Secretary of State for Defence

The First Lord of the Admiralty, [1] or formally the Office of the First Lord of the Admiralty, [2] was the political head of the English and later British Royal Navy. He was the government's senior adviser on all naval affairs, responsible for the direction and control of the Admiralty, and also of general administration of the Naval Service of the Kingdom of England, Great Britain in the 18th century, and then the United Kingdom, including the Royal Navy, the Royal Marines, and other services. It was one of the earliest known permanent government posts. Apart from being the political head of the Naval Service the post holder was simultaneously the pre-eminent member of the Board of Admiralty. The office of First Lord of the Admiralty existed from 1628 until it was abolished when the Admiralty, Air Ministry, Ministry of Defence and War Office were all merged to form the new Ministry of Defence in 1964. Its modern-day equivalent is the Secretary of State for Defence.

Contents

History

In 1628, during the reign of Charles I, George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, Lord High Admiral of England, was assassinated and the office was placed in commission, under the control of a Board of Commissioners.

The first such First Lord of the Admiralty was Richard Weston, 1st Earl of Portland, who was appointed in 1628. The First Lord was not always a permanent member of the board until the Admiralty Department was established as an official government department in 1709 [3] with the First Lord as its head; it replaced the earlier Office of the Admiralty and Marine Affairs. [4] During most of the 17th century and the early 18th century, it was not invariable for the Admiralty to be in commission, so there are gaps in the list of First Lords, and a small number of First Lords were for a time Lord High Admiral.

After the Revolution, in 1690, a declaratory Act was passed, during the reign of William and Mary. Parliament passed the Admiralty Act, vesting in the Commissioners the powers formerly held by the Lord High Admiral of England. [5] and at this point became a permanent Cabinet position.

The Admiralty Commission was dissolved in 1701, but was reconstituted in 1709 on the death of Prince George of Denmark, [3] who had been appointed Lord High Admiral. The office has been held in commission from that time onwards, however, except for a short period (1827–28) when the Duke of Clarence was Lord High Admiral. The Board of the Admiralty comprised a number of "Lords Commissioners" headed by a First Lord. [5]

From the early 1800s the post was always held by a civilian [6] (previously flag officers of the Royal Navy also held the post). In 1832 First Lord Sir James Graham instituted reforms and amalgamated the Board of Admiralty and the Navy Board. By the provisions of the Admiralty Act of 1832, two Lords in committee could legalise any action of the Board. [7]

In 1868 Prime Minister, William Gladstone appointed Hugh Childers First Lord, who would introduce a new system at the Admiralty. However these changes restricted communication between the board members who were affected by these new regulations, and the sittings of the Board were discontinued altogether. This situation described was further exacerbated by the disaster of HMS Captain in 1870, a poorly-designed new vessel for the navy.

The responsibility and powers of the First Lord of the Admiralty were laid down by an Order in Council dated 14 January 1869, [8] and a later Order (19 March 1872) made the First Lord responsible to the Sovereign and to Parliament for all the business of the Admiralty. However, by describing the Lords of the Admiralty as the "assistants" of the First Lord, [9] and by specifically defining their duties, this had, in fact, partially disabled the collective power of the Board.

In 1931, for the first time since 1709, the First Lord was not a member of the cabinet. [10]

In 1946, the three posts of Secretary of State for War, First Lord of the Admiralty, and Secretary of State for Air became formally subordinated to that of Minister of Defence, which had itself been created in 1940 for the co-ordination of defence and security issues.

In 1964, the office of First Lord of the Admiralty was abolished, the last holder being the second Earl Jellicoe, whose father, Admiral of the Fleet the first Earl Jellicoe, had served as First Sea Lord nearly 50 years earlier. The functions of the Lords Commissioners were then transferred to an Admiralty Board, which forms part of the tri-service Defence Council of the United Kingdom.

Principal political leaders of the English/British Armed Forces:
Royal NavyBritish ArmyRoyal Air ForceCo-ordination
1628 First Lord of the Admiralty
(1628–1964)
1794 Secretary of State for War
(1794–1801)
1801 Secretary of State for War and the Colonies
(1801–1854)
1854 Secretary of State for War
(1854–1964)
1919 Secretary of State for Air
(1919–1964)
1936 Minister for Co-ordination of Defence
(1936–1940)
1940 Minister of Defence (1940–1964)
1964 Secretary of State for Defence (1964–present)

List of First Lords of the Admiralty

First Lords of the Admiralty of England (1628–1701)

First Lord of the AdmiraltyTerm of office
RichardWeston.jpg Richard Weston
1st Earl of Portland
[Note 1] [11]
16281635
Robert Bertie, 1st Earl of Lindsey, by circle of Michiel Jansz van Mierevelt.jpg Robert Bertie
1st Earl of Lindsey
[12]
16351636
William Juxon from NPG.jpg William Juxon
Bishop of London
(1582–1663)
[13]
16361638
Algernon Percy.jpeg Algernon Percy
10th Earl of Northumberland
[Note 2] [13]
16421643
Francis Cottington, 1st Baron Cottington from NPG.jpg Francis Cottington
1st Baron Cottington
[13]
16431646
Peter Lely - Prince Rupert of the Rhine - Google Art Project.jpg Prince Rupert of the Rhine [14] 16731679
Peter Lely portrait of Henry Capel 1659.jpg Sir Henry Capell
MP for Tewkesbury [15]
16791681
Daniel Finch, 2nd Earl of Nottingham and 7th Earl of Winchilsea by Jonathan Richardson.jpg Daniel Finch
2nd Earl of Nottingham
[16]
16811684
Admiral Arthur Herbert, 1st Earl of Torrington by John Closterman.jpg Arthur Herbert
1st Earl of Torrington
[Note 3] [17]
16891690
Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke by John Greenhill.jpg Thomas Herbert
8th Earl of Pembroke
[18]
16901692
No image.svg Charles Cornwallis
3rd Baron Cornwallis
[19]
16921693
No image.svg Anthony Cary
5th Viscount Falkland
[20]
16931694
Gibson, Edward Russell.jpg Edward Russell
1st Earl of Orford
[21]
16941699
Portrait of John Egerton 3rd Earl of Bridgewater.jpg John Egerton
3rd Earl of Bridgewater
[22]
16991701
Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke by John Greenhill.jpg Thomas Herbert
8th Earl of Pembroke
[23]
17011702

Senior Members of the Lord High Admiral's Council (1702–1709)

Senior MemberTerm of office
George Rooke.jpg Sir George Rooke [24] 17021705
British (English) School - Sir David Mitchell (c.1650-1710) - BHC4145 - Royal Museums Greenwich.jpg Sir David Mitchell [24] 17051708
No image.svg David Wemyss
4th Earl of Wemyss
[24]
17081709

First Lords of the Admiralty of Great Britain (1709–1801)

First Lord of the AdmiraltyTerm of officeMinistryMonarch
Gibson, Edward Russell.jpg Edward Russell
1st Earl of Orford
[25]
17091710 Godolphin–Marlborough
( ToryWhig )
Anne
Coat of Arms of England (1702-1707).svg
John Leake by Godfrey Kneller.jpg Admiral of the Fleet
John Leake

MP for Rochester [26]
17101712 Oxford–Bolingbroke
Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford (1672-1739) Diplomat.jpg Thomas Wentworth
1st Earl of Strafford
[27]
17121714
George I
Coat of Arms of Great Britain (1714-1801).svg
Gibson, Edward Russell.jpg Edward Russell
1st Earl of Orford
[28]
17141716 Townshend
3rdEarlOfBerkeley2.jpg James Berkeley
3rd Earl of Berkeley
[29]
17171727 Stanhope–Sunderland I
Stanhope–Sunderland II
Walpole–Townshend
George II
Coat of Arms of Great Britain (1714-1801).svg
George Byng, 1st Viscount Torrington by Jeremiah Davison.jpg George Byng
1st Viscount Torrington
[30]
17271733
Walpole
Portrait of Admiral Sir Charles Wager (by Thomas Gibson).jpg Charles Wager
MP for Westminster [Note 4] [31]
17331741
Daniel Finch (1689-1769), 8th Earl of Winchilsea, 3rd Earl of Nottingham, by Thomas Worlidge.jpg Daniel Finch
8th Earl of Winchilsea
[32]
17411744
Carteret
4thDukeOfBedford.jpg John Russell
4th Duke of Bedford
[33]
17441748 Broad Bottom
(I & II)
John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.jpg John Montagu
4th Earl of Sandwich
[34]
17481751
1stLordAnson.jpg George Anson
1st Baron Anson
[35]
17511756
Newcastle I
Richard Grenville-Temple, 2nd Earl Temple by William Hoare.jpg Richard Grenville-Temple
2nd Earl Temple
[36]
17561757 Pitt–Devonshire
Daniel Finch (1689-1769), 8th Earl of Winchilsea, 3rd Earl of Nottingham, by Thomas Worlidge.jpg Daniel Finch
8th Earl of Winchilsea
[32]
17571757 1757 Caretaker
1stLordAnson.jpg George Anson
1st Baron Anson
[37]
17571762 Pitt–Newcastle
George III
Coat of Arms of Great Britain (1714-1801).svg
2ndEarlofHalifaxByJoshuaReynoldsNSArtGallery.jpg George Montague-Dunk
2nd Earl of Halifax
[38]
17621762 Bute
( ToryWhig )
George Grenville (1712-1770) by William Hoare (1707-1792).jpg George Grenville
MP for Buckingham [39]
17621763
John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.jpg John Montagu
4th Earl of Sandwich
[39]
17631763 Grenville
John Perceval, 2nd Earl of Egmont by Thomas Hudson.jpg John Perceval
2nd Earl of Egmont
[39]
17631766
Rockingham I
Chatham
( WhigTory )
Sir Charles Saunders2.jpg Charles Saunders
MP for Hedon [40]
17661766
Edward Hawke 1.jpg Edward Hawke
MP for Portsmouth [41]
17661771
Grafton
North
John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.jpg John Montagu
4th Earl of Sandwich
[42]
17711782
Augustus Keppel, Viscount Keppel by Sir Joshua Reynolds.jpg Augustus Keppel
1st Viscount Keppel
[43]
17821783 Rockingham II
Shelburne
( WhigTory )
Admiral of the Fleet Howe 1726-99 1st Earl Howe by John Singleton Copley.jpg Richard Howe
5th Viscount Howe
[44]
17831783
Augustus Keppel, Viscount Keppel by Sir Joshua Reynolds.jpg Augustus Keppel
1st Viscount Keppel
[45]
17831783 Fox–North
Admiral of the Fleet Howe 1726-99 1st Earl Howe by John Singleton Copley.jpg Richard Howe
5th Viscount Howe
[46]
17831788 Pitt I
Chatham2.JPG John Pitt
2nd Earl of Chatham
[47]
17881794
George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer.jpg George Spencer
2nd Earl Spencer
[48]
17941801

First Lords of the Admiralty of the United Kingdom (1801–1964)

First Lord of the AdmiraltyTerm of officePartyMinistryMonarch
(Reign)
John Jervis, Earl of St Vincent by Francis Cotes.jpg John Jervis
1st Earl of St Vincent
18011804 Whig Pitt I George III
Coat of Arms of Great Britain (1714-1801).svg
Addington
Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville by Sir Thomas Lawrence.jpg Henry Dundas
1st Viscount Melville
18041805 Tory Pitt II
Admiral Charles Middleton, later Lord Barham (1726-1813), by Isaac Pocock.jpg Charles Middleton
1st Baron Barham
18051806 Tory
Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey by Sir Thomas Lawrence copy.jpg Charles Grey
Viscount Howick

MP for Northumberland
18061806 Whig All the Talents
( WhigTory )
Thomas Grenville (1755-1846).jpg Thomas Grenville
MP for Buckingham
18061807 Whig
Henry Phipps, 1st Earl of Mulgrave by Sir William Beechey.jpg Henry Phipps
3rd Baron Mulgrave
18071810 Tory Portland II
Perceval
George Romney (1734-1802) - The Right Honourable Charles Philip Yorke (1764-1834) - 207768 - National Trust.jpg Charles Philip Yorke
MP for St Germans
18101812 Tory
Robert Saunders Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville.jpg Robert Dundas
2nd Viscount Melville
18121827 Tory Liverpool
George IV
Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (1816-1837).svg
WilliamIVbyLonsdale.jpg Prince William Henry
Duke of Clarence

Lord High Admiral [Note 5]
18271828 Canning
( CanningiteWhig )
Goderich
Robert Saunders Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville.jpg Robert Dundas
2nd Viscount Melville
18281830 Tory WellingtonPeel
William IV
Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (1816-1837).svg
Jamesgrantham.png James Graham
MP for East Cumberland [Note 6]
18301834 Whig Grey
George Eden, 1st Earl of Auckland.png George Eden
2nd Baron Auckland
18341834 Whig
Melbourne I
Wellington Caretaker
ThomasEarlGrey.jpg Thomas Robinson
2nd Earl de Grey
18341835 Conservative Peel I
George Eden, 1st Earl of Auckland.png George Eden
2nd Baron Auckland
18351835 Whig Melbourne II
2ndEarlOfMinto.jpg Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound
2nd Earl of Minto
18351841 Whig
Victoria
Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (1837-1952).svg
Thomas Hamilton.jpg Thomas Hamilton
9th Earl of Haddington
18411846 Conservative Peel II
1stEarlOfEllenborough.jpg Edward Law
1st Earl of Ellenborough
18461846 Conservative
George Eden, 1st Earl of Auckland.png George Eden
1st Earl of Auckland
18461849 Whig Russell I
Francis Baring, 1st Baron Northbrook by Sir George Hayter.jpg Francis Baring
MP for Portsmouth
18491852 Whig
Algernon Percy (1792-1865), 4th Duke of Northumberland by Francis Grant.jpg Algernon Percy
4th Duke of Northumberland
18521852 Conservative Who? Who?
Jamesgrantham.png James Graham
MP for Carlisle
18521855 Peelite Aberdeen
( PeeliteWhig )
Palmerston I
1stViscountHalifax.jpg Charles Wood
Bt GCB

MP for Halifax
18551858 Whig
John Pakington 1st Baron Hampton (cropped).jpg John Pakington
MP for Droitwich
18581859 Conservative DerbyDisraeli II
12th Duke of Somerset.png His Grace
Edward Seymour
12th Duke of Somerset
18591866 Liberal Palmerston II
Russell II
John Pakington 1st Baron Hampton (cropped).jpg John Pakington
MP for Droitwich
18661867 Conservative DerbyDisraeli III
Henry Lowry-Corry.jpg Henry Lowry-Corry
MP for Tyrone
18671868 Conservative
Hugh Childers, Lock & Whitfield woodburytype, 1876-83 crop.jpg Hugh Childers
MP for Pontefract
18681871 Liberal Gladstone I
George Goschen by Bassano.jpg George Goschen
MP for City of London
18711874 Liberal
George Ward Hunt (30 July 1825 - 29 July 1877) .jpg George Ward Hunt
MP for Northamptonshire North
18741877 Conservative Disraeli II
William Henry Smith (1825-1891).jpg William Henry Smith
MP for Westminster
18771880 Conservative
Thomas Baring Earl of Northbrook.jpg Thomas Baring
1st Earl of Northbrook
18801885 Liberal Gladstone II
Lord George Hamilton.JPG Lord George Hamilton
MP for Ealing
18851886 Conservative Salisbury I
George Robinson 1st Marquess of Ripon.jpg George Robinson
1st Marquess of Ripon
18861886 Liberal Gladstone III
Lord George Hamilton.JPG Lord George Hamilton
MP for Ealing
18861892 Conservative Salisbury II
5th earl spencer.jpg John Spencer
5th Earl Spencer
18921895 Liberal Gladstone IV
Rosebery
George Goschen by Bassano.jpg George Goschen
MP for St George Hanover Square
18951900 Conservative Salisbury
(III & IV)

( Con.Lib.U. )
William Palmer, 2nd Earl of Selborne.png William Palmer
2nd Earl of Selborne
19001905 Liberal Unionist
Edward VII
Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (1837-1952).svg
Balfour
Lord cawdor.jpg Frederick Campbell
3rd Earl Cawdor
19051905 Conservative
Portrait of Edward Marjoribanks, 2nd Baron Tweedmouth.jpg Edward Marjoribanks
2nd Lord Tweedmouth
19051908 Liberal Campbell-Bannerman
Reginald McKenna photo.jpg Reginald McKenna
MP for North Monmouthshire
19081911 Liberal Asquith
(I–III)
George V
Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (1837-1952).svg
Churchill 1904 Q 42037.jpg Winston Churchill
MP for Dundee
19111915 Liberal
Gws balfour 02.jpg Arthur Balfour
MP for City of London
19151916 Conservative Asquith Coalition
( Lib.Con.–et al.)
Sir Edward Carson, bw photo portrait seated.jpg Edward Carson
MP for Dublin University
19161917 Conservative Lloyd George
(I & II)
Sir Eric Campbell-Geddes in 1917.jpg Eric Geddes
MP for Cambridge
19171919 Conservative
Lord Long .jpg Walter Long
MP for Westminster St George's
19191921 Conservative
Viscount Lee of Fareham.JPG Arthur Lee
1st Baron Lee of Fareham
19211922 Conservative
Leopold Amery MP.png Leo Amery
MP for Birmingham Sparkbrook
19221924 Conservative Law
Baldwin I
1stViscountChelmsford.jpg Frederic Thesiger
1st Viscount Chelmsford
19241924 Independent MacDonald I
William Bridgeman, 1st Viscount Bridgeman.png William Clive Bridgeman [Note 7] 19241929 Conservative Baldwin II
Albert-Victor-Alexander-Earl-Alexander-of-Hillsborough.jpg A. V. Alexander
MP for Sheffield Hillsborough
19291931 Labour
(Co-op)
MacDonald II
Laszlo - The Rt. Hon. Sir Austen Chamberlain.jpg Austen Chamberlain
MP for Birmingham West
19311931 Conservative National I
( N.Lab.Con.–et al.)
Viscount Monsell.jpg Bolton Eyres-Monsell
1st Viscount Monsell
[Note 8]
19311936 Conservative National II
National III
( Con.N.Lab.–et al.)
Edward VIII
Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (1837-1952).svg
Sir Samuel Hoare GGBain.jpg Samuel Hoare
MP for Chelsea
19361937 Conservative
George VI
Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (1837-1952).svg
Duff Cooper 1941.jpg Duff Cooper
MP for Westminster St George's
19371938 Conservative National IV
Stanhope7.JPG James Stanhope
7th Earl Stanhope
19381939 Conservative
Sir Winston Churchill - 19086236948.jpg Winston Churchill
MP for Epping
19391940 Conservative Chamberlain War
Albert-Victor-Alexander-Earl-Alexander-of-Hillsborough.jpg A. V. Alexander
MP for Sheffield Hillsborough
19401945 Labour
(Co-op)
Churchill War
(All parties)
Brendan Bracken 1947.jpg Brendan Bracken
MP for Paddington North
19451945 Conservative Churchill Caretaker
( Con.N.Lib. )
Albert-Victor-Alexander-Earl-Alexander-of-Hillsborough.jpg A. V. Alexander
MP for Sheffield Hillsborough
19451946 Labour
(Co-op)
Attlee
(I & II)
George Henry Hall 1945.jpg George Hall
1st Viscount Hall
19461951 Labour
Lord Longford 4 Allan Warren.jpg Frank Pakenham
1st Baron Pakenham
19511951 Labour
No image.svg James Thomas
1st Viscount Cilcennin
[Note 9]
19511956 Conservative Churchill III
Elizabeth II
Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom.svg
Eden
Quintin Hogg, Baron Hailsham Allan Warren.jpg Quintin Hogg
2nd Viscount Hailsham
19561957 Conservative
10thEarl of Selkirk.jpg George Douglas-Hamilton
10th Earl of Selkirk
19571959 Conservative Macmillan
(I & II)
Peter Carington 1984.jpg Peter Carington
6th Baron Carrington
19591963 Conservative
George Jellicoe, 2nd Earl Jellicoe.jpg George Jellicoe
2nd Earl Jellicoe
19631964 Conservative Douglas-Home

From 1 April 1964 Elizabeth II assumed the title of Lord High Admiral. Ministerial responsibility for the Royal Navy was transferred to the newly created Secretary of State for Defence. [49]

Notes:

  1. Baron Weston from 1628, created Earl of Portland in 1633.
  2. Lord High Admiral 1638–1642.
  3. Lord High Admiral 1689.
  4. MP for Portsmouth until 1734; MP for Westminster from 1734.
  5. As Lord High Admiral .
  6. MP for Cumberland until 1832; MP for East Cumberland from 1832
  7. MP for Oswestry
  8. MP for Evesham until 1935; thereafter created Viscount Monsell.
  9. MP for Hereford until 1955; thereafter created Viscount Cilcennin.

Boards, departments and offices under the First Lord

Fictional First Lords

W. H. Smith portrayed in a Punch cartoon from 13 October 1877 when First Lord, saying: "I think I'll now go below." In Pinafore, Sir Joseph Porter similarly sings: "When the breezes blow / I generally go below". Our New First Lord at Sea.png
W. H. Smith portrayed in a Punch cartoon from 13 October 1877 when First Lord, saying: "I think I'll now go below." In Pinafore, Sir Joseph Porter similarly sings: "When the breezes blow / I generally go below".

The "Radical" First Lord, and a major character, in Gilbert and Sullivan's comic opera H.M.S. Pinafore (1878), is Sir Joseph Henry Porter, KCB. W. S. Gilbert wrote to Arthur Sullivan he did not intend to portray the real-life then First Lord, the bookseller and newsagent W. H. Smith, a Conservative, [50] although some of the public, including Prime Minister Disraeli (who later referred to Smith as "Pinafore Smith"), identified Porter with him. [51] The counterparts shared a known lack of naval background. It has been suggested the character was drawn on Smith's actual "Radical" predecessor of 1868–71, Hugh Childers. [52]

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Admiralty in the 17th century</span>

During the early 17th century, England's relative naval power deteriorated; in the course of the rest of the 17th century, the office of the Admiralty and Marine Affairs steered the Navy's transition from a semi-amateur Navy Royal fighting in conjunction with private vessels into a fully professional institution, a Royal Navy. Its financial provisions were gradually regularised, it came to rely on dedicated warships only, and it developed a professional officer corps with a defined career structure, superseding an earlier mix of sailors and socially prominent former soldiers.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Admiralty in the 18th century</span>

The Glorious Revolution of 1688 rearranged the political map of Europe, and led to a series of wars with France that lasted well over a century. This was the classic age of sail; while the ships themselves evolved in only minor ways, technique and tactics were honed to a high degree, and the battles of the Napoleonic Wars entailed feats that would have been impossible for the fleets of the 17th century. Because of parliamentary opposition, James II fled the country. The landing of William III and the Glorious Revolution itself was a gigantic effort involving 100 warships and 400 transports carrying 11,000 infantry and 4,000 horses. It was not opposed by the English or Scottish fleets.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Department of the Permanent Secretary (Royal Navy)</span>

The Department of the Permanent Secretary also formally known as the Department of the Permanent Secretary to the Admiralty or the Department of the Secretary was the Civil Service department responsible for the control, direction and guidance of all administrative functions of the British Admiralty from 1702 to 1964, it was headed by the Permanent Secretary to the Admiralty.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Civil Lord of the Admiralty</span>

The Civil Lord of the Admiralty formally known as the Office of the Civil Lord of Admiralty also referred to as the Department of the Civil Lord of the Admiralty was a member of the Board of Admiralty who was responsible for managing the Royal Navy's supporting civilian staff, the works and buildings departments and naval lands from 1830 to 1964.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Comptroller of the Navy (Navy Board)</span>

The Comptroller of the Navy originally called the Clerk Comptroller of the Navy was originally a principal member of the English Navy Royal, and later the British Royal Navy, Navy Board. From 1512 until 1832, the Comptroller was mainly responsible for all British naval spending and directing the business of the Navy Board from 1660 as its chairman. The position was abolished in 1832 when the Navy Board was merged into the Board of Admiralty. The comptroller was based at the Navy Office.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lord High Admirals Council</span>

The Lord High Admirals Council was a series of councils appointed to advise and assist the Lord High Admiral of England and then later of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in the direction of Naval Affairs also known as Council of the Lord High Admiral when the Board of Admiralty was not in commission the first series took place between 1702-1708 and second and final series of councils took place from 1827-1828.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Department of the Director of Dockyards</span> British Admiralty department

The Department of the Director of Dockyards, also known as the Dockyard Branch and later as the Dockyards and Fleet Maintenance Department, was the British Admiralty department responsible from 1872 to 1964 for civil administration of dockyards, the building of ships, the maintenance and repair of ships at dockyards and factories, and the supervision of all civil dockyard personnel.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Minister of Defence for the Royal Navy</span>

The Minister of Defence for the Royal Navy was a senior ministerial appointment of the British Government established in April 1964. The office holder was the ministerial head of the Navy Department of the Ministry of Defence, and reported to the Secretary of State for Defence.

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Attribution

Sources