Admiral of the Fleet (Royal Navy)

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Admiral of the Fleet
British Royal Navy OF-10-collected.svg
Insignia shoulder board and Sleeve lace for Admiral of the Fleet
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
The flag of an admiral of the Fleet is the Union Flag, and is in 1:2 rather than the 2:3 of other admirals' flags. [1]
CountryFlag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom
Service branchNaval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg  Royal Navy
Rank Five-star
NATO rank OF-10
Non-NATO rank O-11
Formation1688
Next lower rank Admiral
Equivalent ranks
NaviesArmiesAir forces
Commissioned officers
Admiral of
the fleet
Field marshal or
General of the Army
Marshal of
the air force
Admiral General Air chief marshal
Vice admiral Lieutenant general Air marshal
Rear admiral Major general Air vice-marshal
Commodore Brigadier or
brigadier general
Air commodore
Captain Colonel Group captain
Commander Lieutenant colonel Wing commander
Lieutenant
commander
Major or
Commandant
Squadron leader
Lieutenant Captain Flight lieutenant
Lieutenant
junior grade
or
sub-lieutenant
Lieutenant or
first lieutenant
Flying officer
Ensign or
midshipman
Second lieutenant Pilot officer
Officer cadet Officer cadet Flight cadet
Enlisted grades
Warrant officer or
chief petty officer
Warrant officer or
sergeant major
Warrant officer
Petty officer Sergeant Sergeant
Leading seaman Corporal or
bombardier
Corporal
Seaman Private or
gunner or
trooper
Aircraftman or
airman
Talk·View

Admiral of the Fleet is a five-star naval officer rank and the highest rank of the Royal Navy formally established in 1688. [2] The five-star NATO rank code is OF-10, equivalent to a field marshal in the British Army or a marshal of the Royal Air Force. Other than honorary appointments no new admirals of the fleet have been named since 1995.

Five-star rank

A five-star rank is a very senior military rank, first established in the United States in 1944, with a five-star general insignia, and corresponding ranks in other countries. The rank is that of the most senior operational military commanders, and within NATO's "standard rank scale" it is designated by the code OF-10.

Royal Navy Maritime warfare branch of the United Kingdoms military

The Royal Navy (RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service.

NATO Intergovernmental military alliance of Western states

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, also called the North Atlantic Alliance, is an intergovernmental military alliance between 29 North American and European countries. The organization implements the North Atlantic Treaty that was signed on 4 April 1949. NATO constitutes a system of collective defence whereby its independent member states agree to mutual defence in response to an attack by any external party. NATO's Headquarters are located in Haren, Brussels, Belgium, while the headquarters of Allied Command Operations is near Mons, Belgium.

Contents

History

The origins of the rank can be traced back to Sir John de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Beauchamp de Warwick, who was appointed 'Admiral of the King's Southern, Northern and Western Fleets' on 18 July 1360. [3] The appointment gave the command of the English navy to one person for the first time; the post evolved into the post of Admiral of the Fleet. [4] In the days sailing ships the admiral distinctions then used by the Royal Navy when the fleet was divided into three divisions – red, white, or blue. Each division was assigned an admiral, who in turn commanded a vice-admiral and a rear admiral. The rank of Admiral of the Fleet was formally established in 1688 prior to this date the Admiral of the White was pre-eminent and regarded informally as the admiral of the fleet [5] In the 18th century, the original nine ranks began to be filled by more than one person at any one time. The admiral of the red was pre-eminent and became known as the admiral of the fleet.

Admiral of the Fleet Sir John Paveley de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Beauchamp de Warwick KG was the third son of Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, and brother of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, with whom he became a founder and the tenth Knight of the Order of the Garter in 1348.

Admiral of the South, North and West

The Admiral of the South, North and West formally known as Admiral of the Kings Southern, Northern and Western Fleets or Admiral of all the Fleets about England was a senior English Navy appointment and Commander-in-Chief of the English Navy from 1360 to 1369.

Admiral (Royal Navy) senior rank of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom

Admiral is a senior rank of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom, which equates to the NATO rank code OF-9, outranked only by the rank of admiral of the fleet. Royal Navy officers holding the ranks of rear admiral, vice admiral and admiral of the fleet are sometimes considered generically to be admirals. The rank of admiral is currently the highest rank to which a serving officer in the Royal Navy can be promoted, admiral of the fleet being in abeyance except for honorary promotions of retired officers and members of the Royal Family.

In November 1805, a new rank of Admiral of the Red immediately junior to that of Admiral of the Fleet was created, the announcement on page 1373 of issue 15859 of the London Gazette stating "His Majesty having been pleased to order the Rank of Admirals of the Red to be restored [6] in His Majesty's Navy..." and promoting 22 men then serving as Admirals to that rank. [7]

The organisation of the British fleet into coloured squadrons was abandoned in 1864, although the Royal Navy kept the White Ensign. When the professional head of the Royal Navy was given the title of First Naval Lord in 1828 (renamed First Sea Lord in 1904), the rank of admiral of the fleet became an honorary promotion for retiring First Naval Lords allowing more than one admiral of the fleet to exist at one time. It was broadly customary for the senior Admiral on the active list to be made an Admiral of the Fleet (after 1870 Admirals were obliged to retire at 65) whether or not he had served as First Naval Lord. However, there was no Admiral of the Fleet between 1854 and 1857 (the senior Admiral, Thomas Le Marchant Gosselin [8] [9] had never actually served since he was a Captain in 1809) and on the death of Provo Wallis in 1892 the promotion went to John Edmund Commerell rather than the senior Algernon Frederick Rous de Horsey. In 1914 the criteria were revised and in 1940 the Admirals of the Fleet were exempted from compulsory retirement. [10]

White Ensign British ensign with white field and St Georges cross

The White Ensign, at one time called the St George's Ensign due to the simultaneous existence of a cross-less version of the flag, is an ensign flown on British Royal Navy ships and shore establishments. It consists of a red St George's Cross on a white field with the Union Flag in the upper canton.

First Sea Lord professional head of the United Kingdoms Royal Navy and the whole Naval Service

The First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff (1SL/CNS) is the professional head of the United Kingdom's Royal Navy and the whole Naval Service. Originally the title was the Senior Naval Lord to the Board of Admiralty when the post was created in 1689. The office holder was then re-styled First Naval Lord from 1771. The concept of a professional "First Naval Lord" was introduced in 1805 and the title of the First Naval Lord was changed to "First Sea Lord" on the appointment of Sir Jackie Fisher in 1904. From 1923 onward, the First Sea Lord was a member of the Chiefs of Staff Committee; he now sits on the Defence Council and the Admiralty Board.

Provo Wallis British Royal Navy officer and war hero

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Provo William Parry Wallis, was a Royal Navy officer. As a junior officer, following the capture of USS Chesapeake by the frigate HMS Shannon during the War of 1812, the wounding of HMS Shannon's captain and the death of her first lieutenant in the action, he served as the temporary captain of HMS Shannon for a period of exactly six days as she made her way back to Halifax, Nova Scotia, with Chesapeake flying the Blue Ensign above the Stars and Stripes.

Since 1811 five members of the British Royal family, other than the monarch, and four members of foreign royal families have been appointed admirals of the fleet. Of the British royalty granted the rank, only one, the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII) had not seen service in the Royal Navy.

Edward VII King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions and Emperor of India 1901-1910

Edward VII was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death in 1910.

During the two World Wars a number of serving officers held active commissions as admirals of the fleet, as well as the First Sea Lord. Following the creation of the Chief of the Defence Staff in 1959, the five naval officers appointed to that position became admirals of the fleet. Recognizing the reduced post–Cold War size of the British Armed Forces, no further appointments were made to the rank after 1995 when Sir Benjamin Bathurst was appointed admiral of the fleet on his retirement as First Sea Lord. The rank was not abolished and in 2012 the Prince of Wales became an honorary admiral of the fleet (as well as field marshal and marshal of the Royal Air Force), in recognition of his support to Queen Elizabeth II in her role of as Commander-in-Chief of the British Armed Forces. In 2014, Lord Boyce, a former First Sea Lord and Chief of the Defence Staff, was also appointed an honorary admiral of the fleet. [11]

Chief of the Defence Staff (United Kingdom) professional head of the British Armed Forces

The Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) is the professional head of the British Armed Forces and the most senior uniformed military adviser to the Secretary of State for Defence and the Prime Minister. The Chief of the Defence Staff is based at the Ministry of Defence and works alongside the Permanent Under Secretary, the Ministry's senior civil servant. The Chief of the Defence Staff is the British equivalent position of what in NATO and the European Union is known as the Chief of Defence.

Cold War State of geopolitical tension after World War II between powers in the Eastern Bloc and the Western Bloc

The Cold War was a period of geopolitical tension between the Soviet Union with its satellite states, and the United States with its allies after World War II. A common historiography of the conflict begins between 1946, the year U.S. diplomat George F. Kennan's "Long Telegram" from Moscow cemented a U.S. foreign policy of containment of Soviet expansionism threatening strategically vital regions, and the Truman Doctrine of 1947, and ending between the Revolutions of 1989 and the 1991 collapse of the USSR, which ended communism in Eastern Europe. The term "cold" is used because there was no large-scale fighting directly between the two sides, but they each supported major regional conflicts known as proxy wars. The conflict split the temporary wartime alliance against Nazi Germany, leaving the USSR and the US as two superpowers with profound economic and political differences.

Admiral of the Fleet Sir David Benjamin Bathurst is a former Royal Navy officer. After training as a pilot and qualifying as a helicopter instructor, Bathurst commanded a Naval Air Squadron and then two frigates before achieving higher command in the Navy. He served as First Sea Lord and Chief of the Naval Staff from 1993 to 1995: in that capacity he advised the British Government on the deployment of Naval Support including Sea Harriers during the Bosnian War.

Admirals of the Fleet

Appointed
Image
Name
Born
Died
Notes
Reference
1688 George Legge, 1st Baron Dartmouth by John Riley.jpg George Legge
(later Earl of Dartmouth)
16471691 [12]
1690 Gibson, Edward Russell.jpg Edward Russell
(later Earl of Orford)
16521727 [13]
1696 George Rooke2.jpg Sir George Rooke 16501709circa [14]
13 January 1705 Sir Cloudesley Shovell, 1650-1707.jpg Sir Cloudesley Shovell 16501707 [15]
8 January 1708 John Leake by Godfrey Kneller.jpg Sir John Leake 16561720 [16]
21 December 1708 Stafford Fairborne.jpg Sir Stafford Fairborne 16661742circa [17]
12 November 1709 MatthewAylmer.jpg Sir Matthew Aylmer 16501720 [18]
14 March 1718 George Byng, 1st Viscount Torrington by Jeremiah Davison.jpg Sir George Byng
(later Viscount Torrington)
16631733 [19]
20 February 1734 Admiral Sir John Norris, cirka 1735.jpg Sir John Norris 16701749 [20]
1 July 1749 Chaloner Ogle.JPG Sir Chaloner Ogle 16811750 [21]
22 November 1751 No image.svg James Steuart 16901757 [22]
March 1757 No image.svg The Hon. George Clinton 16861761 [23]
30 July 1761 1stLordAnson.jpg The Lord Anson 16971762 [24]
17 December 1762 Williamrowley.jpg Sir William Rowley 16901768circa [25]
15 January 1768 Edward Hawke 1.jpg Sir Edward Hawke
(later Lord Hawke)
17051781 [26]
24 October 1781 John Forbes portrait.jpg The Hon. John Forbes 17141796 [27]
12 March 1796 Admiral of the Fleet Howe 1726-99 1st Earl Howe by John Singleton Copley.jpg The Earl Howe 17261799 [28]
16 September 1799 Sir peter parker NMM.JPG Sir Peter Parker 17211811 [29]
24 December 1811 William IV by Sir Martin Archer Shee.jpg HRH The Duke of Clarence and St Andrews
(later HM King William IV)
17651837 [30]
19 July 1821 John Jervis, Earl of St Vincent by Francis Cotes.jpg The Earl of St Vincent 17351823acting from May 1814 [31]
28 June 1830 Captain William Peere Williams.jpg William Williams-Freeman 17421832 [32]
22 July 1830 James Gambier.jpg The Lord Gambier 17561833 [33]
22 July 1830 SirCharlesMoricePole.jpg Sir Charles Pole 17571830 [34]
24 April 1833 Admiral of the Fleet Sir Charles Edmund Nugent.JPG Sir Charles Nugent 17591844 [35]
8 January 1844 HawkinsWhitshed.jpg Sir James Hawkins-Whitshed 17621849 [36]
9 November 1846 Admiral Sir George Martin.jpg Sir George Martin 17641847 [37]
13 October 1849 Portrait of Sir Thomas Byam Martin 1773-1854, Thomas Mackay, oil on canvas.jpg Sir Thomas Byam Martin 17731854 [38]
1 July 1851 Sir George Cockburn.jpg Sir George Cockburn 17721853 [39]
8 December 1857 Admiral Sir Charles Ogle, Bart - Amiral sir Charles Ogle, Bart.jpg Sir Charles Ogle 17751858 [40]
25 June 1858 Admiral of the Fleet Sir John West.JPG Sir John West 17741862 [41]
20 May 1862 No image.svg Sir William Gage 17771864 [42]
10 November 1862 No image.svg Sir Graham Hamond 17791862 [43]
27 April 1863 FrancisAusten.jpg Sir Francis Austen 17741865 [44]
27 April 1863 Sir William Parker.jpg Sir William Parker 17811866 [45]
11 January 1864 No image.svg Sir Lucius Curtis 17861869 [46]
12 September 1865 Thomas-john-cochrane.jpg Sir Thomas Cochrane 17891872 [47]
30 November 1866 George Francis Seymour.jpg Sir George Seymour 17871870 [48]
30 January 1868 Rear Admiral James Alexander Gordon.jpg Sir James Gordon 17821869on the Retired List [49]
15 January 1869 Admiral of the Fleet Sir William Bowles.JPG Sir William Bowles 17801869 [50]
2 July 1869 Conde de Penha Firme.JPG Sir George Sartorius 17901885 [51]
21 January 1870 Sir Fairfax Moresby.jpg Sir Fairfax Moresby 17861877 [52]
20 October 1872 Admiral of the Fleet Sir Houston Stewart.JPG Sir Houston Stewart 17911875 [53]
11 December 1875 Provo Wallis.jpg Sir Provo Wallis 17911892 [54]
22 January 1877 Rear-Admiral Henry John Codrington (1808-1877), by Cato Lowes Dickinson.jpg Sir Henry Codrington 18081877 [55]
5 August 1877 Admiral of the Fleet Sir Henry Keppel.jpg Sir Henry Keppel 18091904 [56]
27 December 1877 No image.svg The Earl of Lauderdale 18031878 [57]
27 December 1877 Admiral of the Fleet Sir George Rodney Mundy.JPG Sir Rodney Mundy 18051884 [58]
15 June 1879 Admiral of the Fleet Sir James Hope.JPG Sir James Hope 18081881 [59]
15 June 1879 No image.svg Sir Thomas Symonds 18131894 [59]
10 June 1881 Admiral Alexander Milne (1808-1896), by Walter William Ouless.jpg Sir Alexander Milne, Bt. 18061896on the Retired List [60]
1 December 1881 No image.svg Sir Charles Elliot 18181895 [61]
29 April 1885 Ryderpic.jpg Sir Alfred Ryder 18201888 [62]
18 July 1887 Edward VII in coronation robes.jpg HRH The Prince of Wales
(later HM King Edward VII)
18411910honorary to non-Navy royalty [63]
1 May 1888 Geoffrey Phipps Hornby.jpg Sir Geoffrey Hornby 18251895 [64]
8 December 1888 Lordjohnhay.jpg Lord John Hay 18271916 First Sea Lord 1886 [65]
2 August 1889 Wilhelm II, German Emperor, by Russell & Sons, c1890.jpg HIM German Emperor William II 18591941honorary, to foreign royalty [66]
13 February 1892 VCJohnEdmundCommerell.jpg Sir John Commerell 18291901 [67]
3 June 1893 Alfred-sachsen-coburg-gotha.jpg HRH The Duke of Edinburgh
(later Duke Alfred of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha)
18441900 [68]
20 February 1895 Richard Meade, 4th Earl of Clanwilliam.jpg The Earl of Clanwilliam 18321907 [69]
23 August 1897 Algernon McLennan Lyons.JPG Sir Algernon Lyons 18331908 [70]
29 November 1898 Admiral Frederick Richards, by Arthur Stockdale Cope.jpg Sir Frederick Richards 18331912 First Sea Lord 1893-1899 [71]
13 January 1899 Nowell Salmon VC.JPG Sir Nowell Salmon 18351912 [72]
3 October 1902 James Elphinstone Erskine.jpg Sir James Erskine 18381911 [73]
30 August 1903 Charles Frederick Hotham.jpg Sir Charles Hotham 18431925 [74]
16 June 1904 LordWalterKerr.jpg Lord Walter Kerr 18391927 First Sea Lord 1899-1904 [75]
20 February 1905 Sir Edward H. Seymour 2.jpg Sir Edward Seymour 18401929 [76]
5 December 1905 Adm. John Fisher.jpg Sir John Fisher
(later Lord Fisher)
18411920 First Sea Lord 1905-1910 and 1914-1915 [77]
1 March 1907 Awilson.gif Sir Arthur Wilson 18421921 First Sea Lord 1910-1911 [78]
11 June 1908 Tsar Nikolai II (2).jpg HIM Tsar Nicholas II of Russia 18681918honorary, to foreign royalty [79]
2 December 1908 Gerard Noel.png Sir Gerard Noel 18451918 [80]
27 January 1910 Prinz Heinrich - as GrADM with baton - LC-B2- 2992-2(2).tiff HRH Prince Henry of Prussia 18621929honorary, to foreign royalty [81]
30 April 1910 Adm. Sir A. Fanshawe (LOC).jpg Sir Arthur Fanshawe 18471936 [82]
6 May 1910 King George V 1911 color-crop.jpg HM King George V 18651936 [83]
20 March 1913 Portrait of William May.jpg Sir William May 18491930 [84]
5 March 1915 Hedworth Meux 1915.jpg The Honourable Sir Hedworth Meux 18561929 [85]
2 April 1917 George Callaghan - Project Gutenberg eText 18334.jpg Sir George Callaghan 18521920 [86]
3 April 1919 John Jellicoe, Admiral of the Fleet.jpg The Viscount Jellicoe
(later Earl Jellicoe)
18591935 First Sea Lord 1916-1918 [87]
3 April 1919 Vice Admiral Sir David Beatty.jpg Sir David Beatty
(later Earl Beatty)
18711936 First Sea Lord 1919-1927 [88]
31 July 1919 Henry Bradwardine Jackson.jpg Sir Henry Jackson 18551929 First Sea Lord 1915-1916 [89]
1 November 1919 Rosslyn Erskine Wemyss, Baron Wester Wemyss by Sir William Orpen.jpg Sir Rosslyn Wemyss
(later Lord Wester Wemyss)
18641933 First Sea Lord 1918-1919 [90]
24 November 1920 Vice Admiral Cecil Burney (7307714298).jpg Sir Cecil Burney, Bt. 18581929 [91]
5 July 1921 Frederick Doveton Sturdee.jpg Sir Doveton Sturdee, Bt. 18591925 [92]
19 August 1921 LudwigBattenberg.jpg The Marquess of Milford Haven 18541921 First Sea Lord 1912-1914. On the Retired List [93]
31 July 1924 Charles Madden.jpg Sir Charles Madden, Bt. 18621935 First Sea Lord 1927-1930 [94]
8 May 1925 Admiral Sir Somerset Gough-Calthorpe (1922).jpg The Honourable Sir Somerset Gough-Calthorpe 18641937 [95]
24 November 1925 John Michael de Robeck.jpg Sir John de Robeck, Bt. 18621928 [96]
21 January 1928 Vice-admiral Sir Henry Francis Oliver, Kcb, Mvo Art.IWMART1763.jpg Sir Henry Oliver 18651965 [97]
31 July 1929 Rear-admiral Osmond de Beauvoir Brock Cb Cmg Art.IWMART1722.jpg Sir Osmond Brock 18691947 [98]
8 May 1930 Sir Roger Keyes.jpg Sir Roger Keyes, Bt.
(later Lord Keyes)
18721945 [99]
21 January 1933 Frederick Field (Royal Navy officer).jpg Sir Frederick Field 18711945 First Sea Lord 1930-1933 [100]
31 July 1934 ReginaldTyrwhittportraitbyDodd.jpg Sir Reginald Tyrwhitt, Bt. 18701951 [101]
8 May 1935 Echatfield.jpg Sir Ernle Chatfield
(later Lord Chatfield)
18731967 First Sea Lord 1933-1938 [102]
21 January 1936 Edward Prince of Wales during his visit to Canada in 1919.jpg HM King Edward VIII 18941972 [103]
12 July 1936 Sir John Kelly 18711936 [104]
11 December 1936 Georg VI England.jpg HM King George VI 18951952 [105]
21 January 1938 William Boyle.jpg The Earl of Cork and Orrery 18731967 [106]
7 July 1939 Rbackhouse.jpg Sir Roger Backhouse 18781939 First Sea Lord 1938-1939 [107]
31 July 1939 SirDudleyPound.jpg Sir Dudley Pound 18771943 First Sea Lord 1939-1943 [108]
8 May 1940 Charlesforbes1.JPG Sir Charles Forbes 18801960 [109]
21 January 1943 Andrew Cunningham.jpg Sir Andrew Cunningham
(later Viscount Cunningham of Hyndhope)
18831963 First Sea Lord 1943-1946 [110]
22 October 1943 Tovey-TR 002931.jpg Sir John Tovey
(later Lord Tovey)
18851971 [111]
8 May 1945 INF3-77 pt8 Admiral Sir James Somerville.jpg Sir James Somerville 18821949 [112]
21 January 1948 INF3-76 pt3 Admiral Sir John Cunningham Artist Tim.jpg Sir John Cunningham 18851965 First Sea Lord 1946-1948 [113]
22 October 1948 BruceFraser.JPG The Lord Fraser of North Cape 18881981 First Sea Lord 1948-1951 [114]
20 March 1949 Sir Algernon Willis 18891976 [115]
22 April 1952 Arthurjpower.jpg Sir Arthur Power 18891960 [116]
1 June 1952 Philip Louis Vian.png Sir Philip Vian 18941968 [117]
15 January 1953 Prince Phillip of Edinburgh.jpg HRH The Duke of Edinburgh 1921 Lord High Admiral of the United Kingdom 2011–present [118]
1 May 1953 Admiral McGrigor on HMS Norfolk 1945 IWM A 29405.jpg Sir Rhoderick McGrigor 18931959 First Sea Lord 1951-1955 [119]
22 April 1955 Rear Admiral George Creasy TR2627.jpg Sir George Creasy 18951972 [120]
22 October 1956 Lord Mountbatten Naval in colour Allan Warren.jpg The Earl Mountbatten of Burma 19001979 First Sea Lord 1955-1959 Chief of the Defence Staff 1959–1965 [121]
10 May 1960 Sir Charles Lambe 19001960 First Sea Lord 1959-1960 [122]
23 May 1962 Sir Caspar John 19031984 First Sea Lord 1960-1963 [123]
12 August 1968 Sir Varyl Begg 19081995 First Sea Lord 1966-1968 [124]
30 June 1970 Sir Michael Le Fanu 19131970 First Sea Lord 1968-1970 [125]
12 March 1971 Sir Peter Hill-Norton
(later Lord Hill-Norton)
19152004 First Sea Lord 1970–1971 Chief of the Defence Staff 1971–73 [126]
1 March 1974 Sir Michael Pollock 19162006 First Sea Lord 1971–1974 [127]
9 February 1977 Sir Edward Ashmore 19192016 First Sea Lord 1977-1977 Chief of the Defence Staff 1977 [128]
6 July 1979 Sir Terence Lewin
(later Lord Lewin)
19201999 First Sea Lord 1977–1979 Chief of the Defence Staff 1979–1982 [129]
1 December 1982 Sir Henry Leach 19232011 First Sea Lord 1979–1982 [130]
2 August 1985 Sir John Fieldhouse
(later Lord Fieldhouse)
19281992 First Sea Lord 1982–1985 Chief of the Defence Staff 1985–1988 [131]
12 April 1988 Olav V of Norway.jpg HM King Olav V of Norway 19031991honorary, to foreign royalty [132]
25 May 1989 Sir William Staveley 19281997 First Sea Lord 1985–1989 [133]
2 March 1992 Sir Julian Oswald 19332011 First Sea Lord 1989–1993 [134]
10 July 1995 No image.svg Sir Benjamin Bathurst 1936 First Sea Lord 1993–1995 [135]
16 June 2012 Carlos de Gales (2011).jpg HRH The Prince of Wales 1948Honorary rank [136]
13 June 2014 Admiralmboyce.jpg The Lord Boyce 1943 Chief of the Defence Staff 2001-2003. Honorary rank [137]

See also

Related Research Articles

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Reginald Tyrwhitt Royal Navy admiral of the fleet

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Julian Oswald Royal Navy admiral of the fleet

Admiral of the Fleet Sir John Julian Robertson Oswald was a senior Royal Navy officer. After training as a gunnery specialist, Oswald commanded a frigate and then a destroyer before achieving higher command in the navy. He served as First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff in the early 1990s. In that capacity he advised the British Government on the reduction in the size of the fleet under the Options for Change restructuring programme and on the deployment of Naval Support for the Gulf War in 1991: he also made the decision that members of the Women's Royal Naval Service should be allowed to serve in Royal Navy ships.

Hedworth Meux English naval officer

Admiral of the Fleet The Honourable Sir Hedworth Meux, formerly Hedworth Lambton was a Royal Navy officer. As a junior officer he was present at the bombardment of Alexandria during the Anglo-Egyptian War.

Frederick Field (Royal Navy officer) British Royal Navy officer

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Frederick Laurence Field, was a senior Royal Navy officer. He served in the Boxer Rebellion as commander of a raiding party and in the First World War as commanding officer of the battleship HMS King George V, flagship of Admiral Martyn Jerram at the Battle of Jutland in May 1916. He went on to be Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Fleet before serving as First Sea Lord during the early 1930s in which role dealt with the response to the Invergordon Mutiny in September 1931 and ensured the abandonment in 1932 of the 'ten year rule', an attempt by the treasury to control defence expenditure by requesting the Foreign Office to declare whether there was any risk of war during the next ten years.

Rhoderick McGrigor Royal Navy admiral of the fleet

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Rhoderick Robert McGrigor GCB was a senior Royal Navy officer. He fought in the First World War and saw action during the Gallipoli Campaign and then the Battle of Jutland. He also served in the Second World War, taking part in the sinking of the Bismarck in May 1941, carrying out the office of Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Weapons) and commanding the 1st Cruiser Squadron during operations off the Norwegian coast and convoys to North Russia. He served as First Sea Lord in the early 1950s and is most remembered as a leading proponent of carrier-based air power.

Arthur Power Royal Navy admiral of the fleet

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Arthur John Power was a Royal Navy officer. He took part in the First World War as a gunnery officer and saw action in the Dardanelles Campaign. During the inter-war years he commanded the gunnery school at HMS Excellent and then the aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal. During the Second World War he played a leading role in the planning for the Allied invasion of Sicily and for the Allied invasion of Italy and then commanded the naval forces for the actual landing of V Corps at Taranto in Italy in September 1943. He went on to be Commander-in-Chief of the East Indies Fleet in the closing stages of the war and conducted naval strikes on the Imperial Japanese Army in Borneo and Malaya. After the War he became Second Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Personnel, Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Fleet and then Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth.

Cecil Burney Royal Navy admiral of the fleet

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Cecil Burney, 1st Baronet, was a Royal Navy officer. After seeing action as a junior office in naval brigades during both the Anglo-Egyptian War and the Mahdist War, he commanded a cruiser in operational service during the Second Boer War. As a flag officer he commanded the Plymouth Division of the Home Fleet, the 5th Cruiser Squadron, the Atlantic Fleet and then the 3rd Battle Squadron.

Charles Forbes (Royal Navy officer) Royal Navy admiral of the fleet

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Charles Morton Forbes, was a Royal Navy officer. He served in the First World War, seeing action in the Dardanelles Campaign and at the Battle of Jutland and, as captain of a cruiser, was present at the surrender of the German fleet. During the Second World War, he served as Commander-in-Chief, Home Fleet: his fleet suffered heavy losses including the aircraft carrier HMS Glorious and nine destroyers during the Norwegian Campaign in Spring 1940. He went on to be Commander-in-Chief, Plymouth in May 1941 and in that capacity he organised the defence of Plymouth from air attack, prosecuted attacks on enemy shipping using the harbour at Brest as well as other ports along the French coast, and also initiated the St Nazaire Raid in March 1942 before retiring in August 1943.

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Algernon Usborne Willis was a Royal Navy officer. He served in the First World War and saw action at the Battle of Jutland in May 1916. He also served in the Second World War as Commander-in-Chief, South Atlantic in which capacity he led actions against German and Japanese raiding ships. He continued his war service as Flag Officer commanding 3rd Battle Squadron and Second in command of the Eastern Fleet and then as Flag Officer commanding Force H, the force which covered North African Operations, the Allied invasion of Sicily in July 1943 and then the Allied invasion of Italy in September 1943. He spent the final years of the war as Commander-in-Chief, Levant, in which capacity he conducted naval operations in support of the Dodecanese Campaign, and then as Second Sea Lord, in which capacity he arranged the manpower for the campaign in the Pacific Ocean against the Imperial Japanese Navy. After the war he served as Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Fleet, in which role he was faced with unrest in Mandatory Palestine, before he became Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth.

William Rowley (Royal Navy officer) British Royal Navy officer

Admiral of the Fleet Sir William Rowley KB was a Royal Navy officer. He distinguished himself by his determination as commander of the vanguard at the Battle of Toulon in February 1744 during the War of the Austrian Succession. He went on to be Commander-in-Chief of the Mediterranean Fleet in August 1744 and successfully kept the Spanish and French fleets out of the Mediterranean area but was relieved of his command following criticism of his decision as presiding officer at a court-martial.

George Creasy Royal Navy admiral of the fleet

Admiral of the Fleet Sir George Elvey Creasy, was a senior Royal Navy officer. After serving as a junior officer in the First World War, during which he took part in operations at Heligoland Bight in 1917, he trained as a torpedo officer.

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