Earl of Lisburne

Last updated
Earldom of Lisburne
Coronet of a British Earl.svg
Vaughan arms.svg
Arms:Sable, a Chevron between three Fleurs-de-lis Argent. Crest: An Arm in Armour embowed, holding in the hand a Sword, all proper. Supporters: Dexter: A Dragon reguardant wings elevated Vert, gorged with a Collar Sable, edged and charged with three Fleurs-de-lis Argent, affixed thereto a Chain Or; Sinister:A Unicorn reguardant Argent, armed maned tufted and unguled Or, gorged with a Collar Sable, edged and charged with three Fleurs-de-lis Argent, affixed thereto a Chain Or. [1]
Creation date24 June 1776
Monarch George III
Peerage Peerage of Ireland
First holder Wilmot Vaughan, 4th Viscount Lisburne
Present holderDavid Vaughan, 9th Earl of Lisburne
Heir presumptiveHon. Michael Vaughan
Remainder tothe 1st Earl's heirs male of the body lawfully begotten
Subsidiary titlesViscount Lisburne
Baron Fethard
Former seat(s) Trawsgoed
Mamhead Park
MottoNON REVERTAR INSULTUS
(I will not return unavenged)

Earl of Lisburne is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1776 for Wilmot Vaughan, 4th Viscount Lisburne. [2] He represented Cardiganshire and Berwick-upon-Tweed in the House of Commons and held minor governmental office. [3]

Contents

Not satisfied with the Irish title, Lisburne attempted to cajole his way into a title in the Peerage of Great Britain through his support of the Prime Minister the Duke of Portland. He quite unsuccessfully suggested in a letter that he would withdraw his support if he did not receive a peerage; Lisburne was horrified when his threat reached the ears of the king. "... his Majesty observed upon it that he could not have supposed that Lord Lisburne would have imagined that he was to be frightened into giving peerages—the moment was not open for explanation—your opinion, the declaration of your intentions, was in writing." [3]

His younger son, the third Earl, sat as Member of Parliament for Cardigan. He was succeeded by his son, the fourth Earl. He also represented Cardiganshire in Parliament. [1] His great-grandson, the seventh Earl, served as Lord Lieutenant of Cardiganshire. As of 2015 the titles are held by the latter's grandson, the ninth Earl, who succeeded in 2014. [4]

The titles of Baron Fethard (or Baron Fethers), of Feathered in the County of Tipperary, and Viscount Lisburne, were created in the Peerage of Ireland in 1695 for John Vaughan, Member of Parliament for Cardiganshire and also Lord Lieutenant of that county. His son, the second Viscount, also represented Cardiganshire in Parliament and was Lord-Lieutenant of Cardiganshire. His younger brother, the third Viscount, was also Lord Lieutenant of Cardiganshire. He was succeeded by his son, the aforementioned fourth Viscount, who was created Earl of Lisburne in 1776. [5]

The heir apparent to the earldom uses the invented courtesy title Viscount Vaughan.

The family seat traditionally was Trawsgoed (Crosswood) in Ceredigion (Cardiganshire), Wales. [6] The Lisburne family still own a significant remaining acreage of the Trawsgoed Estate [7]

Viscounts Lisburne (1695)

Earls of Lisburne (1776)

The heir presumptive is the current holder's brother, the Hon. Michael John Wilmot Vaughan (born 1948).

The heir presumptive's heir apparent is his son Edward Wilmot Malet Vaughan (born 1998).

See also

Related Research Articles

Earl Erne

Earl Erne, of Crom Castle in the County of Fermanagh, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1789 for John Creighton, 2nd Baron Erne, who had earlier represented Lifford in the Irish House of Commons. He had already been made Viscount Erne, of Crom Castle in the County of Fermanagh, in 1781, also in the Peerage of Ireland, and sat from 1800 to 1828 as an Irish Representative Peer in the British House of Lords. The title of Baron Erne, of Crom Castle in the County of Fermanagh, was created in the Peerage of Ireland in 1768 for his father Abraham Creighton. The Earl was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Earl. On his death the titles passed to his nephew, the third Earl. He was an Irish Representative Peer from 1845 to 1885 and also served as Lord Lieutenant of County Fermanagh during the same period. In 1876 he was created Baron Fermanagh, of Lisnaskea in the County of Fermanagh, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. This was to allow the Earls to sit in the House of Lords by right, rather than having to stand for election as Representative Peers. An earlier title of Baroness Fermanagh in the Peerage of Ireland was created for Mary Verney on 13 June 1792, but became extinct on her death on 15 November 1810.

Earl of Lonsdale

Earl of Lonsdale is a title that has been created twice in British history, firstly in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1784, and then in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1807, both times for members of the Lowther family.

Earl of Clanwilliam

Earl of Clanwilliam is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1776 for John Meade, 1st Viscount Clanwilliam. The Meade family descends from John Meade, who represented Dublin University and County Tipperary in the Irish House of Commons and served as Attorney-General to James, Duke of York. In 1703, he was created a Baronet, of Ballintubber in the County of Cork, in the Baronetage of Ireland. His eldest son, Pierce, the second Baronet, died unmarried at an early age and was succeeded by his younger brother Richard, the third Baronet. Richard represented Kinsale in the Irish Parliament.

Baron Newborough is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of Ireland. Both titles are extant. The first creation came in 1716 in favour of George Cholmondeley, later 2nd Earl of Cholmondeley. See Marquess of Cholmondeley for further history of this creation. The second creation came in 1776 in favour of Sir Thomas Wynn, 3rd Baronet. He represented Caernarvonshire, St Ives and Beaumaris in the House of Commons and also served as Lord Lieutenant of Caernarvonshire. His eldest son, the second Baron, represented Caernarvonshire in Parliament. He died unmarried and was succeeded by his younger brother, the third Baron. He served as High Sheriff of Anglesey in 1847. On his death the titles passed to his grandson, the fourth Baron. He died as a result of an illness contracted on active service during the First World War and was succeeded by his younger brother, the fifth Baron. When he died in 1957 the titles were inherited by his first cousin, the sixth Baron. He was the son of the Hon. Charles Henry Wynn, third son of the third Baron. As of 2017 the titles are held by the sixth Baron's grandson, the eighth Baron, who succeeded his father in 1998.

Baron Trevor is a title that has been created three times. It was created first in 1662 in the Peerage of Ireland along with the viscountcy of Dungannon. For information on this creation, which became extinct in 1706, see Viscount Dungannon.

Baron Fermoy is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. This title was created by Queen Victoria by letters patent of 10 September 1856 for Edmond Roche. Previous letters patent were issued on 14 May 1855 which purported to create the barony for Roche, but these were ruled invalid in 1856. Under the Acts of Union 1800, three pre-1801 Irish peerages had to go extinct for each new Irish peerage created; the three extinct peerages cited in 1855 were Viscounts Melbourne and Tyrconnel and the Earl of Mountrath; the earldom went extinct in 1802, but the subsidiary title Baron Castle Coote passed by special remainder and remained current until 1827. The Committee for Privileges of the House of Lords reasoned that the number of peerages had reduced in 1802, but the number of peers had not, and so the 1855 patent was incompatible with the terms of the Act of Union. The 1856 patent substituted Viscount O'Neill for Earl of Mountrath and was accepted.

This is a list of people who served as Lord Lieutenant of Cardiganshire. After 1780, all Lord Lieutenants were also Custos Rotulorum of Cardiganshire. The office was abolished on 31 March 1974, and replaced by the Lord Lieutenant of Dyfed.

This is a list of people who have served as Custos Rotulorum of Cardiganshire.

Elizabeth Wilmot, Countess of Rochester British countess

Elizabeth Wilmot, Countess of Rochester was an English heiress and the wife of John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester, the "libertine". She was born Elizabeth Malet, the daughter of John Malet, of Enmore Manor, and Unton Hawley, daughter of Francis Hawley, 1st Baron Hawley.

Wilmot Vaughan, 1st Earl of Lisburne British politician

Wilmot Vaughan, 1st Earl of Lisburne, of Trawsgoed, Cardiganshire, known as Viscount Lisburne from 1766 to 1776, was a Welsh peer and politician.

John Vaughan, 3rd Earl of Lisburne, known as the Honourable John Vaughan until 1820, was a British soldier and Member of Parliament for Cardigan Boroughs.

Ernest Augustus Vaughan, 4th Earl of Lisburne, styled Viscount Vaughan from 1820 to 1831, was a prominent landowner in Cardiganshire, Wales who served from 1854 until 1859 as a Conservative member of the British House of Commons.

Trawsgoed village in the county of Powys, Wales

The Trawsgoed Estate is an estate located eight miles (13 km) east of Aberystwyth in Ceredigion, Wales and in the community of Trawsgoed that has been in the possession of the Vaughan family since 1200. The family are descended from Collwyn ap Tangno, founder of the fifth noble tribe of North Wales, Lord of Eifionydd, Ardudwy, and part of Llŷn, who had his residence on the site of Harlech Castle. The land falls within the ancient parish of Llanafan, in the upper division of the hundred of Ilar. In Wales, an ancient parish was a village or group of villages or hamlets and the adjacent lands. Originally they held ecclesiastical functions, but from the sixteenth century they also acquired civil roles. The parish may have been established as an ecclesiastical parish. Originally a medieval administrative unit, after 1597 ecclesiastical units were separated from civil parishes to serve the ecclesiastical needs of the local community. The Trawsgoed estate extended over 22 Cardiganshire parishes, including Llanafan. The community of Trawsgoed has a population of 989 (2011).

Edward Vaughan was a Welsh lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1679 to 1681.

John Vaughan, 1st Viscount Lisburne, of Trawsgoed, Cardiganshire, was a Welsh nobleman.

John Vaughan, 2nd Viscount Lisburne was a Welsh landowner and Whig politician who sat in the British House of Commons from 1727 to 1734. Apparently a heavy drinker, who kept several mistresses, he informally separated from his second wife in 1729 after she had an affair with his land agent. His spending badly impaired the financial soundness of his estate, and his brother and successor had to contend with the claims of Lisburne's wife's son on the estate.

Wilmot Vaughan, 3rd Viscount Lisburne, styled Hon. Wilmot Vaughan until 1762, was a Welsh landowner and Irish peer. He inherited his titles and the Trawsgoed estate in Cardiganshire from his elder brother in 1741, but the estate was heavily financially encumbered, and he had to spend over a decade defending it from the claims of his brother's estranged wife and her son. His marriage to an heiress in some measure recouped the family fortunes.

Wilmot Vaughan, 2nd Earl of Lisburne, styled Hon. Wilmot Vaughan from 1766 to 1776 and Viscount Vaughan from 1776 to 1800, was a Welsh landowner and Irish peer.

Ernest Edmund Henry Malet Vaughan, 7th Earl of Lisburne, of Trawsgoed, Cardiganshire, was a Welsh nobleman.

Ernest Augustus Malet Vaughan, 4th Earl of Lisburne (1836-1888), was a prominent landowner in Cardiganshire, Wales who sought election to the British House of Commons at the 1868 General Election.

References

  1. 1 2 Debrett, John (1847). Debrett's Genealogical Peerage of Great Britain and Ireland. p. 472. Retrieved 7 October 2015.
  2. "No. 11679". The London Gazette . 2 July 1776. p. 1.
  3. 1 2 "VAUGHAN, Wilmot, 1st Earl of Lisburne [I] (1728-1800), of Crosswood, Card". History of Parliament Online. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 7 October 2015.
  4. "The Earl of Lisburne - obituary". The Daily Telegraph . 17 November 2014. Retrieved 7 October 2015.
  5. Debrett, John (1820). Debrett's Peerage of England, Scotland, and Ireland. p.  992 . Retrieved 7 October 2015.
  6. Aslet, Clive (29 December 2007). "Village voice: Trawsgoed". The Daily Telegraph . Retrieved 7 October 2015.
  7. Cahill, Kevin (2001). Who Owns Britain & Ireland. London: Canongate. ISBN   9780862419127.