Eleazer Goulding House

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Eleazer Goulding House
Eleazer Goulding House, Sherborn MA.jpg
Eleazer Goulding House
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Location Sherborn, Massachusetts
Coordinates 42°14′27″N71°24′24″W / 42.24083°N 71.40667°W / 42.24083; -71.40667 Coordinates: 42°14′27″N71°24′24″W / 42.24083°N 71.40667°W / 42.24083; -71.40667
Built1825
ArchitectMann, Capt. Ebenezer
Architectural styleFederal
MPS Sherborn MRA
NRHP reference No. 86000501 [1]
Added to NRHPJanuary 3, 1986

The Eleazer Goulding House is a historic house at 137 Western Avenue in Sherborn, Massachusetts. The house was built in 1825 by Capt. Ebenezer Mann, a local master builder. The 2-1/2 story wood frame house is a finely-detailed and well-preserved example of Federal style, with a side gable roof, twin interior chimneys, and clapboard siding. Its main entrance is flanked by Doric pilasters, and topped by a dentillated cornice and fanlight. Possibly due to its country setting, Mann built it with simpler styling than houses he built in the village center around the same time. [2]

The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. April 15, 2008.
  2. "NRHP nomination for Eleazer Goulding House". Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved 2014-05-08.