Extradition Act 2003

Last updated
Extradition Act 2003
Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (HM Government).svg
Long title An Act to make provision about extradition.
Citation 2003 c. 41
Dates
Royal assent 20 November 2003
Commencement 1 January 2004
Status: Amended
Records of Parliamentary debate relating to the statute from Hansard, at TheyWorkForYou
Text of statute as originally enacted
Text of the Extradition Act 2003 as in force today (including any amendments) within the United Kingdom, from legislation.gov.uk.
A map of countries with whom the UK has extradition treaties. The UK is in green, category 1 countries are in blue, and category 2 countries are in red. UK Extradition.PNG
A map of countries with whom the UK has extradition treaties. The UK is in green, category 1 countries are in blue, and category 2 countries are in red.

The Extradition Act 2003 (c.41) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom which regulates extradition requests by and to the United Kingdom. The Act came into force on 1 January 2004. It transposed the European Arrest Warrant framework decision into British law and implemented the UK side of the controversial UK–US extradition treaty of 2003 before the treaty came into force in April 2007 after being ratified by the US Senate in 2006. [1] [2]

Contents

Provisions

The Act is divided into five parts.

The procedure used by the courts is set down in the Criminal Procedure Rules 2015, part 50. [3]

Examination by Parliament

The Act has been examined in two reviews by Parliament. The first in 2011 by Sir Scott Baker [4] making a series of recommendations and the second examination by the House of Lords Extradition Law Committee in 2014. [5]

As a result of campaigning and scrutiny by Parliament, several important amendments were made in 2014 in the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014. These included proportionality under section 21A and decision to try or charge under section 12A. [6]

Part 2 territories

Territories are designated as Category 2 territories both for the purposes of Part 2 of the Extradition Act, i.e. export extradition from the United Kingdom, and Part 3, i.e. import extradition to the United Kingdom. The following are the countries that the UK presently has extradition arrangements with:

Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, The Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Cook Islands, Cuba, Dominica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Fiji, The Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Haiti, Iceland, India, Iraq, Israel, Jamaica, Kenya, Kiribati, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Macedonia, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Nauru, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Peru, The Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Saint Christopher and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Switzerland, Tanzania, Thailand, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, USA, Vanuatu, Western Samoa, Zambia, Zimbabwe. [7] [8]

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References

  1. Human Rights Joint Committee (22 June 2011). "The UK's bilateral extradition treaties: US-UK Extradition Treaty 2003". The Human Rights Implications of UK Extradition Policy. Retrieved 8 August 2012.
  2. Torres, Carlos (30 September 2006). "Senate Unanimously Ratifies US, UK Extradition Treaty". Bloomberg L.P. Retrieved 12 September 2008. Ratification had been slowed by complaints from some Irish- American groups that the treaty would create new legal jeopardy for U.S. citizens who opposed British policy in Northern Ireland.
  3. "Rules and Practice Directions". www.justice.gov.uk. Retrieved 2019-10-18.
  4. "Review" (PDF). gov.uk. 30 September 2011. Retrieved 2019-11-09.
  5. "Extradition Law Committee". UK Parliament. Retrieved 2019-10-18.
  6. "Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 2019-10-18.
  7. http://www.cps.gov.uk/legal/d_to_g/extradition/annex_c_-_extradition_with_territories_outside_the_european_union_/#a02 Archived 2016-11-30 at the Wayback Machine UKOpenGovernmentLicence.svg This content is available under the Open Government Licence v3.0. © Crown copyright. Archived 2016-12-25 at the Wayback Machine
  8. "Extradition: processes and review". GOV.UK. Retrieved 2019-10-18.