Honky Tonk Women

Last updated

  1. Margotin and Guesdon write Ian Stewart contributed piano, [18] while authors Andy Babiuk and Greg Prevost write it was Hopkins. [16]
  2. While Babiuk and Prevost credit Bell with the song's backing vocals, [16] Margotin and Guesdon instead write it was Reparata and the Delrons, Doris Troy and Nanette Workman. [19]
  3. Margotin and Guesdon are uncertain whether Jagger or the Stones' tour manager, Sam Cutler, honked the car's horn, [20] while Babiuk and Prevost write the horn belonged to Cutler's car. [17]

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jumpin' Jack Flash</span> 1968 single by The Rolling Stones

"Jumpin' Jack Flash" is a song by the English rock band the Rolling Stones, released as a non-album single in 1968. Called "supernatural Delta blues by way of Swinging London" by Rolling Stone magazine, the song was perceived by some as the band's return to their blues roots after the baroque pop and psychedelia heard on their preceding albums Aftermath (1966), Between the Buttons (1967) and especially Their Satanic Majesties Request (1967). One of the group's most popular and recognisable songs, it has featured in films and been covered by numerous performers, notably Thelma Houston, Aretha Franklin, Tina Turner, Peter Frampton, Johnny Winter, Leon Russell and Alex Chilton. To date, it is the band's most-performed song: they have played it over 1,100 times in concert.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Not Fade Away (song)</span> 1957 single by The Crickets

"Not Fade Away" is a song credited to Buddy Holly and Norman Petty and first recorded by Holly and his band, the Crickets.

<i>The Rolling Stones</i> (album) 1964 studio album by the Rolling Stones

The Rolling Stones is the debut studio album by the English rock band the Rolling Stones, released by Decca Records in the UK on 16 April 1964. The American edition of the LP, with a slightly different track list, came out on London Records on 30 May 1964, subtitled England's Newest Hit Makers, which later became its official title.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ruby Tuesday (song)</span> Song by the Rolling Stones

"Ruby Tuesday" is a song recorded by the Rolling Stones in 1966, released in January 1967. The song became the band's fourth number-one hit in the United States and reached number three in the United Kingdom as a double A-side with "Let's Spend the Night Together". The song was included in the American version of Between the Buttons.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Let's Spend the Night Together</span> 1967 song by the Rolling Stones

"Let's Spend the Night Together" is a song written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, and originally released by the Rolling Stones as a double A-sided single together with "Ruby Tuesday" in January 1967. It also appears as the opening track on the American version of their album Between the Buttons. The song has been covered by various artists, including David Bowie in 1973.

As Tears Go By (song) 1964 pop song

"As Tears Go By" is a song written by Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, and Rolling Stones' manager Andrew Loog Oldham. Marianne Faithfull recorded and released it as a single in the United Kingdom in 1964. Her song peaked at number nine on both the UK and Irish singles charts. Later, the Rolling Stones recorded their own version, which was included on the American album December's Children . London Records released it as a single, which reached number six in the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.

We Love You 1967 single by the Rolling Stones

"We Love You" is a song by the English rock band the Rolling Stones that was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. It was first released as a single on 18 August 1967, with "Dandelion" as the B-side. The song peaked at number eight in Britain and number 50 in the United States, where "Dandelion" was promoted as the A-side and peaked at number 14. The recording features a Mellotron part played by Brian Jones and backing vocals by John Lennon and Paul McCartney of the Beatles.

Get Off of My Cloud 1965 single by The Rolling Stones

"Get Off of My Cloud" is a song by the English rock band the Rolling Stones. It was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards for a single to follow the successful "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction". Recorded in Hollywood, California, in early September 1965, the song was released in September in the United States and October in the United Kingdom. It topped the charts in the US, UK, Canada, and Germany and reached number two in several other countries.

"Sittin' on a Fence" is a song written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of the English rock and roll band the Rolling Stones. The song was given to the singing duo Twice as Much, who released it as their debut single in May 1966. This version became a Top 40 hit on the UK Singles Chart, and also received some attention in the United States, where it charted on the Billboard Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Out of Time (Rolling Stones song)</span> 1966 song by the Rolling Stones

"Out of Time" is a song by the Rolling Stones, first released on their 1966 album Aftermath. The most commercially successful version of the song was by Chris Farlowe, an English solo artist. Farlowe's single, produced by Mick Jagger, peaked at number one in the UK Singles Chart on 28 July 1966 and stayed at the top for one week. A shorter alternative mix of the Rolling Stones' recording was released in the US in 1967 on the album Flowers. A third version featuring Jagger's lead vocal and the orchestration and backing vocals from Farlowe's cover version was released on the 1975 rarities album Metamorphosis and as a single.

Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow? 1966 song by the Rolling Stones

"Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow?" is a song by the English rock band the Rolling Stones. Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, it was recorded in the late summer of 1966 during early sessions for what would become their Between the Buttons album. It was the first Stones single to be released simultaneously in both the UK and the US, and reached number five and number nine on those countries' charts, respectively.

Mothers Little Helper 1966 song by the Rolling Stones

"Mother's Little Helper" is a song by the English rock band the Rolling Stones. A product of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards' songwriting partnership, it is a folk rock song with Eastern influences. Its lyrics deal with the popularity of prescribed tranquilisers like Valium among housewives and the potential hazards of overdose or addiction. Recorded in December 1965, it was first released in the United Kingdom as the opening track of the band's April 1966 album, Aftermath. In the United States, it was omitted from the album and instead issued as a single in July 1966. The Rolling Stones' twelfth US single, "Mother's Little Helper" spent nine weeks on the US Billboard Hot 100, peaking at No. 8, and reached No. 4 on both Record World and Cash Box's charts.

"Ride On, Baby" is a song by English rock band the Rolling Stones. It was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards in 1965. It was first released as a single by Chris Farlowe in October 1966 and reached No. 31 on the British charts. The Rolling Stones' own version appeared a few months later on Flowers, an album released only in the US in June 1967. It was recorded during the Aftermath sessions in December 1965.

Yesterday's Papers is a song by the Rolling Stones from their 1967 album, Between the Buttons. It was the first song that Mick Jagger wrote by himself for the group. It appears as the opening track on the UK version of the album and on the US version as the second track.

"Sweet Virginia" is the sixth track on the Rolling Stones' 1972 double album Exile On Main St.. This album was mostly recorded in Villa Nellcôte, France, as well as recorded in 1970 at Olympic Studios, with vocal overdubs added in early 1972 at Sunset Sound Studios, "Sweet Virginia" is a slow country-inspired song, written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. The song features a harmonica solo by Jagger, and a saxophone solo by Bobby Keys. Charlie Watts plays a country shuffle rhythm. An alternate version without the backing singers was released on bootlegs. The version of the song that the band re-recorded for Stripped is featured in Martin Scorsese's 1995 film Casino, and the original recording is played over the closing credits of Rian Johnson's 2019 film Knives Out.

Dandelion (Rolling Stones song) 1967 single by the Rolling Stones

"Dandelion" is a song by the English rock band the Rolling Stones, written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, and first released as a B-side to "We Love You" in August 1967. John Lennon and Paul McCartney sing backing vocals. Billboard described the single as "an easy beat rocker with good story line."

19th Nervous Breakdown 1966 single by the Rolling Stones

"19th Nervous Breakdown" is a song recorded by the English rock band the Rolling Stones. Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, it was recorded in late 1965 and released as a single in February 1966. It reached number 2 on both the US Billboard Hot 100 and Britain's Record Retailer chart, while topping the charts compiled by Cash Box and NME. In the UK, it broke the band's streak of consecutive number-one singles that had started with "It's All Over Now" (1964).

"Goin' Home" is a song recorded by the English rock band the Rolling Stones. Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, it was the longest popular music song at the time, coming in at 11 minutes and 35 seconds, and was the first extended rock improvisation released by a major recording act. It was included as the sixth track on side one of the United Kingdom version and the fifth track on side two of the American version of the band's 1966 studio album Aftermath.

2000 Light Years from Home 1967 single by the Rolling Stones

"2000 Light Years from Home" is a song by the English rock band the Rolling Stones, released on their 1967 album Their Satanic Majesties Request. Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, it also appeared as the B-side to the American single "She's a Rainbow", and charted as a single in Germany.

"Think" is a Mick Jagger and Keith Richards composition that first appeared as a Chris Farlowe single which reached No 37 on the UK Singles Chart in January 1966.

References

  1. Steve Jones (20 May 2014). Start You Up: Rock Star Secrets to Unleash Your Personal Brand and Set Your Career on Fire. Greenleaf Book Group Press. p. 117. ISBN   978-1-62634-070-1.
  2. 1 2 Unterberger, Richie. Song Review by Richie Unterberger at AllMusic. Retrieved 19 May 2007.
  3. Elliott, Martin (2002). The Rolling Stones: Complete Recording Sessions 1962-2002. Cherry Red Books. p. 148. ISBN   1-901447-04-9.
  4. "Kappa Magazine". Revistakappa.com.br. p. 100. Retrieved 2 October 2016.
  5. The Rolling Stones "Honky Tonk Women". Time Is on Our Side. (accessed 19 May 2007).
  6. "Honky Tonk Women". Keno.org. Archived from the original on 1 February 2014. Retrieved 27 March 2014.
  7. "Country Honk - Lyrics". Keno.org. Archived from the original on 8 January 2015. Retrieved 27 March 2014.
  8. Appleford, Steve (1997). The Rolling Stones It's Only Rock and Roll: Song by Song. New York: Schirmer Books. p. 88.
  9. McPherson, Ian. "Track Talk: Honky Tonk Women" . Retrieved 27 August 2009.
  10. Patricia Leigh Brown (14 November 1989). "Blade Runner Meets Rock 'N' Roll The Steel Wheels Set Serves As An Urban Jungle Gym For Mick Jagger's Imagination". Sun-Sentinel.com. Sun Sentinel. Archived from the original on 22 October 2019. Retrieved 22 October 2019.
  11. Marcus, Greil (23 August 1969). "Records". Rolling Stone . No. 40. San Francisco: Straight Arrow Publishers, Inc. p. 35. Archived from the original on 21 August 2014. Retrieved 25 April 2016.
  12. "Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time". Rolling Stone. April 2010. Retrieved 28 September 2015.
  13. Eric v.d. Luft (21 September 2009). Die at the Right Time!: A Subjective Cultural History of the American Sixties. p. 410. ISBN   9781933237398 . Retrieved 2 October 2016.
  14. Cutler, Sam. You Can't Always Get What You Want - My Life with the Rolling Stones, the Grateful Dead and Other Wonderful Reprobates ISBN   978-1-74166-609-0
  15. Margotin & Guesdon 2016, pp. 292–293, 308–311.
  16. 1 2 3 Babiuk & Prevost 2013, p. 317.
  17. 1 2 3 Babiuk & Prevost 2013, p. 316.
  18. Margotin & Guesdon 2016.
  19. Margotin & Guesdon 2016, pp. 308–309.
  20. Margotin & Guesdon 2016, p. 292.
  21. "The Rolling Stones – Honky Tonk Women" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  22. "The Rolling Stones – Honky Tonk Women" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  23. "Top RPM Singles: Issue 6002." RPM . Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  24. Inc, Nielsen Business Media (23 August 1969). "Billboard". Nielsen Business Media, Inc. via Google Books.
  25. Nyman, Jake (2005). Suomi soi 4: Suuri suomalainen listakirja (in Finnish) (1st ed.). Helsinki: Tammi. p. 240. ISBN   951-31-2503-3.
  26. "The Rolling Stones – Honky Tonk Women" (in German). GfK Entertainment charts. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  27. "The Irish Charts – Search Results – Honky Tonk Women". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved 18 June 2016.
  28. "The Rolling Stones – Honky Tonk Women" (in Dutch). Single Top 100. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  29. "flavour of new zealand - search listener". Flavourofnz.co.nz. Retrieved 2 October 2016.
  30. "The Rolling Stones – Honky Tonk Women". VG-lista. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  31. "Listas de superventas: 1969". 12 February 2010.
  32. "Låtarna från Kvällstoppen 19 augusti 1969". NostalgiListan.
  33. "The Rolling Stones – Honky Tonk Women". Swiss Singles Chart. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  34. "Rolling Stones: Artist Chart History". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  35. "The Rolling Stones Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  36. "Item Display - RPM - Library and Archives Canada". Collectionscanada.gc.ca. Retrieved 2 October 2016.
  37. "Top 100 Hits of 1969/Top 100 Songs of 1969". Musicoutfitters.com. Retrieved 2 October 2016.
  38. "Billboard Hot 100 60th Anniversary Interactive Chart". Billboard. Retrieved 10 December 2018.
  39. "British single certifications – Rolling Stones – Honky Tonk Women". British Phonographic Industry . Retrieved 15 December 2021.
  40. "American single certifications – The Rolling Stones – Honky Tonk Woman". Recording Industry Association of America . Retrieved 17 June 2016.

Sources

"Honky Tonk Women"
RollStones-Single1969 HonkyTonkWomen.jpg
Single by the Rolling Stones
B-side "You Can't Always Get What You Want"
Released4 July 1969 (1969-07-04)
RecordedJune 1969
Studio Olympic, London
Genre
Length3:03
Label
Songwriter(s) Jagger/Richards
Producer(s) Jimmy Miller
Rolling Stones UK singles chronology
"Jumpin' Jack Flash"
(1968)
"Honky Tonk Women"
(1969)
"Brown Sugar"
(1971)
Rolling Stones USsingles chronology
"Street Fighting Man"
(1968)
"Honky Tonk Women"
(1969)
"Brown Sugar"
(1971)