Iran Standard Time

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Time in the Middle East

UTC+02:00
Egypt Standard Time /
Central Africa Time
UTC+02:00

UTC+03:00
Eastern European Time /
Israel Standard Time /
Palestine Standard Time
Eastern European Summer Time /
Israel Summer Time /
Palestine Summer Time
UTC+03:00
Turkey Time
Arabia Standard Time
UTC+03:30
UTC+04:30
Iran Standard Time
Iran Daylight Time
UTC+04:00
Gulf Standard Time
Light colors indicate where standard time is observed all year; dark colors indicate where daylight saving time is observed. Time Zones of the Middle East.svg
Time in the Middle East
   UTC+02:00 Egypt Standard Time /
Central Africa Time
   UTC+02:00

UTC+03:00
Eastern European Time /
Israel Standard Time /
Palestine Standard Time
Eastern European Summer Time /
Israel Summer Time /
Palestine Summer Time
   UTC+03:00 Turkey Time
Arabia Standard Time
   UTC+03:30
UTC+04:30
Iran Standard Time
Iran Daylight Time
   UTC+04:00 Gulf Standard Time
Light colors indicate where standard time is observed all year; dark colors indicate where daylight saving time is observed.

Iran Standard Time (IRST) or Iran Time (IT) is the time zone used in Iran. Iran uses a UTC offset UTC+03:30. IRST is defined by the 52.5 degrees east meridian, the same meridian which defines the Iranian calendar and is the official meridian of Iran.

Contents

Between 2005 and 2008, by decree of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iran did not observe daylight saving time (called Iran Daylight Time or IRDT). [1] [2] It was reintroduced from 21 March 2008.

Daylight Saving Time transitions

The dates of DST transitions in Iran are based on the Solar Hijri calendar, the official calendar of Iran, which is in turn based on the March equinox (Nowruz) as determined by astronomical calculation at the meridian for Iran Standard Time (52.5°E or GMT+3.5h). This results in the unusual situation wherein the dates of DST transitions don't fall on the same weekday each year as they do in most other countries.

DST starts in Iran at 24:00 on 1 Farvardin, which corresponds to either 20 or 21 March in the Gregorian calendar, depending on the precise timing of the equinox. (This is equivalent to 00:00 on 2 Farvardin, either 21 or 22 March.) Clocks move forward at that time to 01:00 on 2 Farvardin (21 or 22 March). This spring change takes place at the end of the day of Nowruz, which is the Iranian New Year's Day [3] and the most important festival in Iranian culture.

DST likewise ends in Iran at 24:00 on 30 Shahrivar, which corresponds to either 20 or 21 September. (Equivalently, at 00:00 on 31 Shahrivar, either 21 or 22 September). Clocks move backward to 23:00 on 30 Shahrivar (20 or 21 September). [4] [5]

Recent and upcoming dates

Year [6] DST StartDST End
2017Wed, Mar 22, 00:00Fri, Sep 22, 00:00
2018Thu, Mar 22, 00:00Sat, Sep 22, 00:00
2019Fri, Mar 22, 00:00Sun, Sep 22, 00:00
2020Sat, Mar 21, 00:00Mon, Sep 21, 00:00
2021Mon, Mar 22, 00:00Wed, Sep 22, 00:00
2022Tue, Mar 22, 00:00Thu, Sep 22, 00:00
2023Wed, Mar 22, 00:00Fri, Sep 22, 00:00

Time zone changes

Period in useTime offset from GMTName of Time
before 1945 UTC+03:25:44 Tehran Mean Time (TMT)
1946 – 1977 UTC+03:30 Iran Standard Time (IRST)
1977 – 1978 UTC+04:00
UTC+05:00
Iran Standard Time (IRST)
Iran Daylight Time (IRDT)
1979 – 1980 UTC+03:30
UTC+04:30
Iran Standard Time (IRST)
Iran Daylight Time (IRDT)
1981 – 1990 UTC+03:30 Iran Standard Time (IRST)
1991 – 2005 UTC+03:30
UTC+04:30
Iran Standard Time (IRST)
Iran Daylight Time (IRDT)
2006 – 2007 UTC+03:30 Iran Standard Time (IRST)
2008 – present UTC+03:30
UTC+04:30
Iran Standard Time (IRST)
Iran Daylight Time (IRDT)

IANA time zone database

The IANA time zone database contains one zone for Iran in the file zone.tab, named Asia/Tehran.

See also

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Before 1979, Daylight saving time was observed in Iran. Thereafter it was abandoned until 1989, when it started on the first day of Farvardin in the Iranian calendar and ended on the last day of Shahrivar. In the Spring of 2006, the government of Iran ceased observing DST. However in September 2007, the Majlis passed a law restoring daylight saving time starting from March 21, 2008, despite opposition by the contemporary government.

Daylight saving time in Asia

As of 2017, daylight saving time is used in the following Asian countries:

The Solar Hijri calendar, also called the Iranian Hijri calendar or Shamsi Hijri calendar, and abbreviated as SH, is the official calendar of Iran and Afghanistan. It begins on the March equinox (Nowruz) as determined by astronomical calculation for the Iran Standard Time meridian and has years of 365 or 366 days.

Time in the Danish Realm

Denmark, including the dependencies Faroe Islands and Greenland, uses six time zones.

References

  1. "Iran will not observe DST". Presstv.ir. 20 March 2007. Retrieved 9 May 2010.
  2. "Time zone and daylight saving time for Iran – Tehran between 2010 and 2019". Timeanddate.com. Retrieved 9 May 2010.
  3. "Culture of Iran: No-Rooz, The Iranian New Year at Present Times". www.iranchamber.com. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  4. Roozbeh Pournader (15 March 2003). "Iran daylight saving time correction" . Retrieved 1 December 2018.
  5. tz database (30 November 2018). "asia file, lines 1278–1299" . Retrieved 1 December 2018.
  6. "Time Changes in Tehran over the years".