Jacqueline Winspear

Last updated
Jacqueline Winspear
Jacqueline Winspear 4012295.jpg
Born (1955-04-30) April 30, 1955 (age 65)
Alma mater University of London
Occupation Writer
Notable work
Maisie Dobbs
Spouse(s)John Morrell

Jacqueline Winspear (born April 30, 1955) is a mystery writer, author of the Maisie Dobbs series of books exploring the aftermath of World War I. She has won several mystery writing awards for books in this popular series.

Contents

Personal life and career

Winspear was born on April 30, 1955, and raised in Cranbrook, in Kent. [1] She was educated at the University of London's Institute of Education and then worked in academic publishing, higher education and in marketing communications. She emigrated to the United States in 1990. Winspear stated that her childhood awareness of her grandfather's suffering in World War I led to an interest in that period. [2]

Maisie Dobbs series

Maisie Dobbs is a private investigator who untangles painful and shameful secrets stemming from war experiences. A gifted working class girl, she received an unusual education thanks to the patronage of her employer. She interrupts her education to work as a nurse in the war, falls in love and suffers her own loss. After the war, again with help from her patron, she sets up as an investigator. Dobbs places emphasis on achieving healing for her clients and insists they comply with her ethical approach.

Books

Maisie Dobbs series

  1. Maisie Dobbs SOHO : 2003. ISBN   9781569473306, OCLC   519884816
  2. Birds of a Feather (2004)
  3. Pardonable Lies (2005)
  4. Messenger of Truth (2006)
  5. An Incomplete Revenge (2008)
  6. Among the Mad (2009)
  7. The Mapping of Love and Death (2010)
  8. A Lesson in Secrets (2011)
  9. Elegy for Eddie (2012)
  10. Leaving Everything Most Loved (2013)
  11. A Dangerous Place (2015)
  12. Journey to Munich (2016)
  13. In This Grave Hour (2017)
  14. To Die but Once (2018) [3]
  15. The American Agent Harper Collins, 2019. ISBN   9780062436665, OCLC   1041763123 [4] [5] [6] [7]
  16. The Consequences of Fear (2021) ISBN   978-0062868022

Standalone

Memoir

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