List of food industry trade associations

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This is a list of food industry trade associations. A trade association is an organization founded and funded by businesses that operate in a specific industry. An industry trade association participates in public relations activities such as advertising, education, political donations, lobbying and publishing, but its focus is collaboration between companies. Associations may offer other services, such as producing conferences, networking or charitable events or offering classes or educational materials. Many associations are non-profit organizations governed by bylaws and directed by officers who are also members.

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Food industry trade associations

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Finnish cuisine Culinary traditions of Finland

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Delicatessen

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Cuisine of Philadelphia

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Breakfast sandwich

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Steak-umm

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