List of minor Apogee Software video games

Last updated

The following is a list of the earliest, lesser-known video games published by Apogee Software. For a full listing of Apogee/3D Realms games, see list of 3D Realms games.

3D Realms video game developer. Formerly known as Apogee Software (1987–1996)

Apogee Software, Ltd., doing business as 3D Realms since 1996, is an American video game developer and publisher based in Garland, Texas. The company is best known for popularizing the shareware distribution model for video games in the 1980s and 90s, as well as for creating game franchises, such as Duke Nukem. 3D Realms was founded by Scott Miller in 1987 as Apogee Software Productions, in preparation for the release of Kingdom of Kroz. Apogee Software adopted the trading name 3D Realms in 1996, and the rights to the former name and logo were eventually sold to Terry Nagy in 2008, using which he established Apogee Software, LLC.

Contents

Games

Adventure Fun-Pak

Adventure Fun-Pak
Developer(s) Apogee Software
Publisher(s) Apogee Software
Designer(s) various
Platform(s) MS-DOS
Release 1989
Genre(s) various
Mode(s) Single-player

Adventure Fun-Pak is a collection of four video games created by Scott Miller and various independent developers who submitted their programs to Apogee for publication. Miller categorized these submissions by genre and released this collection and the companion Puzzle Fun-Pak as non-shareware commercial products. Each collection was sold as a single package distributed on one floppy disk. [1] Apogee re-released both collections as freeware on 28 May 2004. [2] The following games are included: [3]

Scott Miller is an American video game designer, programmer, and entrepreneur best known for founding Apogee Software, Ltd. in 1987. Starting with the Kroz series for MS-DOS from that year, Miller pioneered the concept of giving away the first game in a trilogy—distributed freely as shareware—with the opportunity to purchase the remaining two episodes. This method became the standard distribution method for Apogee. Competitors such as Epic MegaGames later adopted the same business model.

Floppy disk disk storage medium

A floppy disk, also known as a floppy, diskette, or simply disk, is a type of disk storage composed of a disk of thin and flexible magnetic storage medium, sealed in a rectangular plastic enclosure lined with fabric that removes dust particles. Floppy disks are read and written by a floppy disk drive (FDD).

Artillery games are early two or three-player video games involving tanks fighting each other in combat or similar. Artillery games are among the earliest computer games developed; the theme of such games is an extension of the original uses of computer themselves, which were once used to calculate the trajectories of rockets and other related military-based calculations. Artillery games have been described as a type of "shooting game", though they are more often classified as a type of strategy video game.

The action game is a video game genre that emphasizes physical challenges, including hand–eye coordination and reaction-time. The genre includes a large variety of sub-genres, such as fighting games, beat 'em ups, shooter games and platform games. Some multiplayer online battle arena and real-time strategy games are also considered action games.

<i>Dig Dug</i> 1982 arcade game

Dig Dug is an arcade video game developed and published by Namco in Japan in 1982. It runs on Namco Galaga hardware, and was published in North America and Europe by Atari, Inc.. Gakken made a tabletop handheld game of Dig Dug in 1982. It was one of a series of three "flip-top" games with a VFD screen and magnifying Fresnel lens.

Beyond the Titanic

Beyond the Titanic
Developer(s) Apogee Software
Publisher(s) Apogee Software
Designer(s) Scott Miller
Platform(s) MS-DOS
Release 1986
Genre(s) Text adventure
Mode(s) Single-player

Beyond the Titanic is a text adventure game written by Scott Miller for MS-DOS in BASIC in September 14, 1984. [5] No images accompany the game's textual descriptions, but a variety of colors are employed to enhance the layout of the game's text. A panel near the top of the screen continuously displays the player's score and number of moves thus far. Also included is the ability to save the game and restore a previously saved game. The game begins on the sinking ship Titanic from which an escape must be sought. Upon doing so the player character is swept away into a mysterious underground complex. The objective of the game is to escape these predicaments and find a way to return home to San Francisco.

BASIC Programming language

BASIC is a family of general-purpose, high-level programming languages whose design philosophy emphasizes ease of use. In 1964, John G. Kemeny and Thomas E. Kurtz designed the original BASIC language at Dartmouth College. They wanted to enable students in fields other than science and mathematics to use computers. At the time, nearly all use of computers required writing custom software, which was something only scientists and mathematicians tended to learn.

Saved game piece of digitally stored information about the progress of a player in an electronic game

A saved game is a piece of digitally stored information about the progress of a player in a video game.

RMS <i>Titanic</i> British transatlantic passenger liner, launched and foundered in 1912

RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. Of the estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, more than 1,500 died, making it one of modern history's deadliest commercial marine disasters during peacetime. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time she entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. She was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, chief naval architect of the shipyard at the time, died in the disaster.

Originally released in 1986 before Miller founded Apogee, [6] the game was later branded and advertised [7] as an Apogee product. Both it and Supernova are the only two games published by Apogee as traditional shareware. [8] Miller permitted the full game to be freely copied and distributed by its users, but they were encouraged to "register" it by sending him a cash donation to compensate him for his effort, to "encourage the author to make new and better games" and to qualify for "telephone support and clues". [9] Although he had hoped that donations accompanying user registrations would become a significant source of revenue, this expectation failed to be realized as most users did not register the game. [10] He concluded that this strategy "was not the way to go." [6] It seemed to him that gamers were "more apt to simply take what they could get for free" [10] and that he needed to introduce a greater incentive to get users to register his games. Miller's experience with Beyond the Titanic and Supernova led him to develop the Apogee model which would become Apogee's standard method of marketing future releases.

Beyond the Titanic was re-released as freeware by Apogee on March 10, 1998. [11] The source code for the game was released under GPL on March 20, 2009. [12]

In computing, source code is any collection of code, possibly with comments, written using a human-readable programming language, usually as plain text. The source code of a program is specially designed to facilitate the work of computer programmers, who specify the actions to be performed by a computer mostly by writing source code. The source code is often transformed by an assembler or compiler into binary machine code understood by the computer. The machine code might then be stored for execution at a later time. Alternatively, source code may be interpreted and thus immediately executed.

Jumpman Lives!

Jumpman Lives!
Developer(s) Shamusoft Designs
Publisher(s) Apogee Software
Designer(s) Dave Sharpless
Platform(s) MS-DOS
Release June 10, 1991
Genre(s) Platform, Puzzle
Mode(s) Single-player

Jumpman Lives! is an unauthorized 1991 MS-DOS remake of the Jumpman platform action game originally released by Epyx in 1983. The remake closely emulates the original in its gameplay and in the graphical appearance of the multi-platform levels in which the player character walks, jumps, and climbs ladders and ropes to clear each level of bombs and avoid lethal hazards such as bullets. Both the original and the remake share the same basic plot: a multi-level orbital science station needs to be cleared of bombs planted by a radical group. [13] In the original game the station orbits the planet Jupiter, but in the remake it is in orbit around Saturn. [14] Included in the remake are levels from the original game, a sequel entitled Jumpman Jr. (also published by Epyx) and some newly created ones. [15] Other enhancements in the remake include a level editor, Sound Blaster support, and three skill levels. [16]

Dave Sharpless designed and developed the game in co-operation with Apogee, the game's publisher. Scott Miller had obtained his address from a registration text file accompanying an earlier shareware game he had self-published. Miller contacted Sharpless, who agreed to create a Jumpman remake for Apogee. Sharpless chose to work with Apogee in part because it would handle all the marketing and distribution related tasks including preparing floppy disks with copies of the program, affixing labels to them and mailing them out to customers. [15] [17] Once Sharpless had created the level editor, it was used as the basis for constructing each of the game's 45 levels. He did most of the level design himself while Apogee's staff developed the game's introductory graphics, text screens (e.g. ordering information), and a few bonus levels. [15] In accordance with Apogee's standard marketing practice at the time, the game was split into multiple episodes; the first episode was freely distributable as shareware and the remaining three episodes were commercial products which could be purchased directly from Apogee. Each episode consists of approximately 12 levels.

Jumpman Lives! was featured in PC Magazine's "PC MagNet News" column, where Chris Parker described it as a "clever merge of arcade action and intriguing designs." [13]

Permission to create this remake had not been obtained from Epyx, the holder of the Jumpman copyright at the time. When Epyx learned of its existence, the company asked Apogee to discontinue it. Thus Jumpman Lives was commercially available for only a few months following its release. [18] Apogee no longer retains any control over or copyright in this title. [19] (See also Jumpman.)

Puzzle Fun-Pak

Puzzle Fun-Pak
Developer(s) Apogee Software
Publisher(s) Apogee Software
Designer(s) various
Platform(s) MS-DOS
Release 1989
Genre(s) various
Mode(s) Single-player, Two player (Phrase Master)

Puzzle Fun-Pak is a collection of four video games created by Scott Miller and various independent developers who submitted their programs to Apogee for publication. Miller categorized these submissions by genre and released this collection and the companion Adventure Fun-Pak as non-shareware commercial products. Each collection was sold as a single package distributed on one floppy disk. [1] Apogee re-released both collections as freeware on 28 May 2004. [2] The following games are included: [3]

Star Trek: The Next Generation Trivia

Star Trek: The Next Generation Trivia
Developer(s) Micro F/X Software
Publisher(s) Apogee Software
Designer(s) George Broussard
Platform(s) MS-DOS
Release
Genre(s) Educational
Mode(s) Single-player

Star Trek: The Next Generation Trivia (also known as Next Generation Trivia) is a trivia video game about the Star Trek: The Next Generation TV series written for MS-DOS. Developed by George Broussard and originally published by his label Micro F/X Software, it was marketed and distributed by Apogee after Broussard joined the company. The game consists of three volumes each featuring 100 multiple choice questions related to Star Trek: The Next Generation. Questions randomly chosen from the volume's database are sequentially presented to the player, who responds by selecting a numbered response from a list. For each correct answer, the game reveals a bonus Star Trek: The Next Generation fact. Players begin the game with three credits; every ten correct responses earn the player an additional credit, but each incorrect response costs the player one credit. [20] When the player runs out of credits or has attempted all 100 questions, the game ends and the player's level of Star Trek: The Next Generation knowledge is ranked on the basis of how many questions were correctly answered. The game's look and feel is largely text-based, but multicolored ASCII line graphics and text are used to enhance the presentation.

Star Trek: The Next Generation Trivia was marketed via the Apogee model. Only the first volume was freely distributable as shareware; the remaining volumes were commercial products which could be purchased directly from Apogee.

When the Star Trek copyright holder Paramount discovered that Apogee was profiting from their intellectual property, they offered Apogee a license for the game idea. Apogee did not accept the offer, as the license would have cost more than what Apogee was making on the game. [21] Therefore, Apogee discontinued the game, and they no longer retain any copyright or control over on it. [22]

Super Game Pak

Super Game-Pak
Developer(s) Apogee Software
Publisher(s) Apogee Software
Designer(s) Scott Miller
Platform(s) MS-DOS
Release 1989
Genre(s) various
Mode(s) Single-player

Super Game Pak is a video game compilation published by Apogee in 1989 featuring a diverse selection of games previously released by Apogee or Scott Miller (prior to founding Apogee). It was marketed as an introduction to Apogee's game line. [7] The collection includes:

Supernova

Supernova
Developer(s) Apogee Software
Publisher(s) Apogee Software
Designer(s) Scott Miller
Platform(s) MS-DOS
Release 1987
Genre(s) Text adventure
Mode(s) Single-player

Supernova is a text adventure video game designed by Scott Miller for MS-DOS and published by Apogee Software. The game's text was co-written by Scott Miller and Terry Nagy. Although Supernova's plot is unrelated to that of Miller's previous text adventure Beyond the Titanic , its game engine and look and feel represent an evolutionary development from the earlier game. No images accompany the game's textual descriptions, but a variety of colors are employed to enhance the layout of the game's text. A panel near the top of the screen continuously displays the player's score, location, number of moves thus far, and the player character's condition (e.g. thirsty). Also included is the ability to save the game and restore a previously saved game. Miller wrote that the game features over four hundred sound effects, 16-color ASCII graphics, a hint command and a parser which recognizes over a thousand words. [7] The game begins with the player character seeking employment on the surface of a barren mining planet. As the game progresses, the player discovers that an imminent supernova is threatening to destroy a planetary civilization. The main goal of the game is to save its inhabitants from this imminent catastrophe.

Originally released in 1987 before Miller founded Apogee, [6] the game was later branded and advertised [7] as an Apogee product. Both it and Beyond the Titanic are the only two games published by Apogee as traditional shareware. [8] Miller permitted the full game to be freely copied and distributed by its users, but they were encouraged to "register" it by sending him a cash donation to compensate him for his effort, to "encourage the author to make new and better games" and to qualify for "telephone support and clues". [23] Although he had hoped that donations accompanying user registrations would become a significant source of revenue, this expectation failed to be realized as most users did not register the game. [10] He concluded that this strategy "was not the way to go." [6] It seemed to him that gamers were "more apt to simply take what they could get for free" [10] and that he needed to introduce a greater incentive to get users to register his games. Miller's experience with Beyond the Titanic and Supernova led him to develop the Apogee model which would become Apogee's standard method of marketing future releases.

Apogee also sold the game's Turbo Pascal 3.0 source code and marketed it to "novice programmers trying to learn the 'tricks of the trade'" [7] [24]

Supernova was re-released as freeware by Apogee on March 26, 1998. [8] The source code for the game was released under GPL on March 20, 2009. [12]

The Thor Trilogy

The Thor Trilogy
Developer(s) Scenario Software
Publisher(s) Apogee Software
Designer(s) Todd Replogle
Platform(s) MS-DOS
Release 1989
Genre(s) Maze
Mode(s) Single-player

The Thor Trilogy (also known as Caves of Thor) is a maze video game published in 1989 by Apogee Software. It was developed by Todd Replogle under the Scenario Software name.

The game places the player trapped within the Caves of Thor. The object of the game is to locate three missing items scattered throughout the place. The missing items are the Female-item, the Heart-item and the Male-item. The game's interface, gameplay and graphics are similar to a previous Apogee game, Kingdom of Kroz , and to the game ZZT .

The game was originally distributed as shareware. It consists of three volumes, with only the first volume distributed as shareware, and the rest available commercially. The volumes are:

The source code of the game used to be available for U$195.00 (in 1990) directly from Todd Replogle. The game was discontinued, and it was later re-released as freeware by Apogee in December 2005.

The game includes PC speaker renditions of various classical music pieces, including Flight of the Bumblebee by Rimsky-Korsakov, two preludes from the Well-Tempered Clavier by J.S. Bach, and Solfeggietto by C.P.E. Bach.

Trek Trivia

Trek Trivia
Developer(s) Apogee Software
Publisher(s) Apogee Software
Designer(s) Scott Miller
Platform(s) MS-DOS
Release
Genre(s) Educational
Mode(s) Single-player

Trek Trivia is a trivia video game about the Star Trek TV series, written in Turbo Pascal 5.0 for MS-DOS and published by Apogee Software. The game consists of ten volumes each featuring 100 multiple choice questions related to Star Trek. Questions randomly chosen from the volume's database are sequentially presented to the player, who responds by selecting a numbered response from a list. For each correct answer, the game reveals a bonus Star Trek fact. Players begin the game with three credits; every ten correct responses earn the player an additional credit, but each incorrect response costs the player one credit. [25] When the player runs out of credits or has attempted all 100 questions, the game ends and the player's level of Star Trek knowledge is ranked on the basis of how many questions were correctly answered. The game's look and feel is largely text-based, but multicolored ASCII line graphics and text are used to enhance the presentation.

Trek Trivia was marketed via the Apogee model. Only the first volume was freely distributable as shareware; the remaining volumes were commercial products which could be purchased directly from Apogee. Apogee also sold the game's Turbo Pascal 5.0 source code which it marketed to "novice programmers trying to learn the 'tricks of the trade'" [7]

When the Star Trek copyright holder Paramount discovered that Apogee was profiting from their intellectual property, they offered Apogee a license for the game idea. Apogee did not accept the offer because the license would have cost more than what Apogee was making on the game. [21] Therefore, Apogee discontinued the game, and they no longer retain any copyright or control over it. [22]

Trivia Whiz

Trivia Whiz
Developer(s) Micro F/X Software
Publisher(s) Apogee Software
Designer(s) George Broussard
Platform(s) MS-DOS
Release 1988
Genre(s) Educational game
Mode(s) Single-player

Trivia Whiz is a general trivia game written for MS-DOS, published by Apogee Software. It was originally published by George Broussard under Micro F/X Software, before he joined Apogee.

Trivia Whiz was distributed as shareware. It consists of five volumes (named Volume 1 to 5), with only the first volume distributed as shareware, and the rest available commercially. Each volume has 100 multiple choice questions on a large variety of topics.

The game was discontinued, and it was later re-released as freeware by Apogee in December 2005.

Word Whiz

Word Whiz
Developer(s) Apogee Software
Publisher(s) Apogee Software
Designer(s) Scott Miller
Platform(s) MS-DOS
Release 1988
Genre(s) Educational game
Mode(s) Single-player

Word Whiz is a trivia game written for MS-DOS, published by Apogee Software. It consists of various questions about different English words.

Word Whiz was distributed as shareware. It consists of four volumes (named Volume 1 to 4), with only the first volume distributed as shareware, and the rest available commercially. Each volume has 100 multiple choice questions, each one about a specific word.

Word Whiz is written in Turbo Pascal 5.0 and the source code was for sale for $100.

The game was discontinued, and it was later re-released as freeware by Apogee in December 2005. The source code for the game was released under GPL on March 20, 2009. [12]

Related Research Articles

<i>Rise of the Triad</i> game from 1994

Rise of the Triad: Dark War is a first-person shooter video game, developed and published by Apogee Software in 1995. The player can choose one of five different characters to play as, each bearing unique attributes such as height, speed, and endurance. Its remake was designed by Interceptor Entertainment and released by Apogee Games in 2013.

<i>Commander Keen</i> video game series

Commander Keen is a series of side-scrolling platform video games developed primarily by id Software. The series consists of six main episodes, a "lost" episode, and a final game; all but the final game were originally released for MS-DOS in 1990 and 1991, while the 2001 Commander Keen was released for the Game Boy Color. The series follows the eponymous Commander Keen, the secret identity of the eight-year-old genius Billy Blaze, as he defends the Earth and the galaxy from alien threats with his homemade spaceship, rayguns, and pogo stick. The first three episodes were developed by Ideas from the Deep, the precursor to id, and published by Apogee Software as the shareware title Commander Keen in Invasion of the Vorticons; the "lost" episode 3.5 Commander Keen in Keen Dreams was developed by id and published as a retail title by Softdisk; episodes four and five were released by Apogee as the shareware Commander Keen in Goodbye, Galaxy; and the simultaneously developed episode six was published in retail by FormGen as Commander Keen in Aliens Ate My Babysitter. Ten years later, a homage and sequel to the series was developed by David A. Palmer Productions and published by Activision as Commander Keen.

<i>Catacomb 3-D</i> 1991 video game by id software

Catacomb 3-D is the third in the Catacomb series of video games, and the first of these games to feature 3D computer graphics. The game was originally published by Softdisk under the Gamer's Edge label, and is a first-person shooter with a dark fantasy setting. The player takes control of the high wizard Petton Everhail, descending into the catacomb of the Towne Cemetery to defeat the evil lich Nemesis and rescue his friend Grelminar.

<i>Wacky Wheels</i> video game

Wacky Wheels is an MS-DOS arcade kart racing video game released by Apogee Software in 1994. The game strongly resembles Super Mario Kart from the Super NES, but the karts are described as lawn mowers and the eight playable characters are animals from a zoo. It was released on GOG.com with support for Windows, Linux and macOS on August 20, 2014 and later released on Steam on May 6, 2015 as part of the 3D Realms Anthology.

<i>Raptor: Call of the Shadows</i> 1994 video game

Raptor: Call of the Shadows is a 2D vertical-scroller single player game developed by Cygnus Studios and published by Apogee Software. Its working title was "Mercenary 2029". It was released on April 1, 1994 for DOS.

<i>Kroz</i> video game series

The Kroz series is a series of video games created by Scott Miller. The first episode in the series, Kingdom of Kroz, was released in 1987 as Apogee Software's first game. It was also published on Big Blue Disk #20. The games were discontinued in 1999, and are no longer sold by Apogee. In March 2009, the whole Kroz series was released as freeware by Apogee.

<i>Stargunner</i> 1996 video game

Stargunner is a 1996 horizontal scrolling shooter computer game published by Apogee Software and released for DOS and Windows.

<i>Bio Menace</i> 1993 video game

Bio Menace is a 2D, side-scrolling, platform game developed and published by Apogee Software for DOS. It was set for release in November 15, 1991 but due to re-configuring the engine that was used in Commander Keen in Goodbye, Galaxy, it took two years to develop. It was built on a licensed version of id Software's Commander Keen game engine, and was known as Bio Hazard during production. Apart from the engine and music, all in-game content was created by the game's designer, Jim Norwood. In 2014, the game was re-released on Steam, and in 2015 on GOG.com with support for Windows, Mac OS, and Linux.

<i>Monuments of Mars</i> 1991 video game

Monuments of Mars is a third-person puzzle platform video game developed by Scenario Software for DOS and published by Apogee Software. The game consists of four 20-level episodes, the first episode being shareware, the rest being commercial software. It is based on the FAST CGA game engine from Arctic Adventure and Pharaoh's Tomb, developed by Todd Replogle, and later published by Apogee.

<i>Jetpack</i> (video game) 1993 video game

Jetpack is a platform game available as freeware, developed by American studio Adept Software and originally published as shareware by Software Creations in 1993. The object of the levels is to collect all of the green emeralds scattered around the level while avoiding obstacles and enemies. Once accomplished, a door opens which the player must go through in order to advance to the next level. There is a single player, and a local multiplayer mode. The multiplayer mode supports up to eight players, where players take turns on the same machine.

<i>Boppin</i> 1991 video game

Boppin' is a puzzle-oriented video game created by Jennifer Diane Reitz in 1991, developed under the company name Accursed Toys and published by Karmasoft for the Amiga computer with only 32 colors on screen. Around that time Karmasoft held a level design contest. The game sold poorly with 284 copies, so Jennifer got it republished by Apogee Software with up to 256 colors on screen. Due to mature content containing blood and Seppuku, the game was rated for players aged 25.

<i>Pharaohs Tomb</i> 1990 video game

Pharaoh's Tomb is a DOS platform game created by George Broussard and published by Apogee Software.

<i>Arctic Adventure</i> (video game) 1991 video game

Arctic Adventure is a platform game written for DOS, published by Apogee Software. It is the sequel to Pharaoh's Tomb. The protagonist, Nevada Smith, is an archaeologist searching for a Viking treasure in the Arctic. It was re-released on Steam in 2015 with support for Windows and macOS.

<i>Math Rescue</i> 1992 video game

Math Rescue is a 1992 educational platform game created by Karen Crowther of Redwood Games and published by Apogee Software. Its early pre-release title was "Number Rescue". Released in October, 1992, for the DOS platform, it is a loose successor to the earlier game Word Rescue, whose game engine was used to power the new game with minor changes. Math Rescue was initially released as shareware but later achieved a retail release. It was followed by Math Rescue Plus. There were plans to have a sequel to the game called "Gruzzle Puzzles" but it was never started.

<i>Dark Ages</i> (1991 video game) 1991 video game

Dark Ages is a platform game written for DOS, published by Apogee Software. It was the first shareware game to feature support for the AdLib sound card.

<i>Commander Keen in Invasion of the Vorticons</i> 1990 episodic DOS video game

Commander Keen in Invasion of the Vorticons is a three-part episodic side-scrolling platform video game developed by Ideas from the Deep and published by Apogee Software in 1990 for MS-DOS. It is the first set of episodes of the Commander Keen series. The game follows the titular Commander Keen, an eight-year-old child genius, as he retrieves the stolen parts of his spaceship from the cities of Mars, prevents a recently arrived alien mothership from destroying landmarks on Earth, and hunts down the leader of the aliens, the Grand Intellect, on the alien home planet. The three episodes feature Keen running, jumping, and shooting through various levels while opposed by aliens, robots, and other hazards.

<i>Commander Keen in Goodbye, Galaxy</i> video game

Commander Keen in Goodbye, Galaxy is a two-part episodic side-scrolling platform video game developed by id Software and published by Apogee Software in 1991 for DOS. It consists of the fifth and sixth episodes of the Commander Keen series, though they are numbered as the fourth and fifth, as Commander Keen in Keen Dreams is outside of the main continuity. The game follows the titular Commander Keen, an eight-year-old child genius, as he first journeys through the Shadowlands to rescue the Gnosticenes so they may ask the Oracle how the Shikadi plan to destroy the galaxy, and then through the Shikadi's Armageddon Machine to stop them. The two episodes feature Keen running, jumping, and shooting through various levels while opposed by aliens, robots, and other hazards.

References

  1. 1 2 Miller, Scott (1989). Other Games From Apogee Software Productions. Apogee Software. This software catalogue was distributed as a README text file accompanying early Apogee releases.
  2. 1 2 Siegler, Joe (28 May 2004). "Some Ancient Apogee Games Released as Freeware". 3D Realms . Retrieved 1 April 2012.
  3. 1 2 In-game instructions. 2004 freeware release.
  4. 1 2 3 Stoddard, Samuel (30 September 2005). "What's Apogee's relationship with Softdisk?". The Apogee FAQ (Version 7.2w). RinkWorks. Retrieved 3 April 2012.
  5. Beyond the Titanic - Source Code
  6. 1 2 3 4 "Detailed Release Timeline". 3D Realms . Retrieved 6 April 2012.
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Miller, Scott (1990). The Games From Apogee Software Productions. Apogee Software. This software catalogue was distributed as a README text file accompanying early Apogee releases.
  8. 1 2 3 Siegler, Joe (26 March 1998). "Supernova Released as Freeware!". 3D Realms . Retrieved 6 April 2012.
  9. Scott Miller (1998). Beyond the Titanic. MS-DOS. Apogee Software. Scene: Introduction.
  10. 1 2 3 4 Kushner, David (2004). Masters of Doom: How Two Guys Created an Empire and Transformed Pop Culture. Random House. p. 61. ISBN   9780812972153.
  11. Siegler, Joe (10 March 1998). "Beyond the Titanic Released as Freeware!". 3D Realms . Retrieved 6 April 2012.
  12. 1 2 3 Siegler, Joe. "Several old games released as Freeware". 3DRealms . Retrieved 26 March 2009.
  13. 1 2 Parker, Chris (10 September 1991). "On-line Guide to PC MagNet". PC Magazine . 10 (15): 434.
  14. In an interview, Jumpman Lives! designer Dave Sharpless states that this change of planetary setting was not a deliberate design choice.
  15. 1 2 3 "Dave Sharpless Interview (part 1/2)". The Jumpman Lounge. 30 September 2004. Archived from the original on 10 October 2008. Retrieved 3 April 2012.
  16. Matero, Lon (28 May 2004). "Jumpman Lives!". Lon Matero's Apogee Page. Archived from the original on 31 March 2008. Retrieved 3 April 2012.
  17. Siegler, Joe (20 March 2006). "The Apogee Legacy #11 - Dave Sharpless". 3D Realms . Retrieved 3 April 2012.
  18. "Dave Sharpless Interview (part 2/2)". The Jumpman Lounge. 30 September 2004. Archived from the original on 10 October 2008. Retrieved 3 April 2012.
  19. Siegler, Joe (25 February 1999). "Jumpman Died!". 3D Realms . Retrieved 3 April 2012.
  20. George Broussard (1987). Star Trek: The Next Generation Trivia. MS-DOS. Micro F/X Software/Apogee Software. Scene: Instructions.
  21. 1 2 Joe Siegler explains the rationale for not accepting a license agreement from Paramount
  22. 1 2 "We do not retain any copyright or control on the following titles: Star Trek Trivia, Star Trek: TNG Trivia, and Jumpman Lives! (which means we don't care what you do with these three games - we don't have anything to do with them anymore)."
  23. Scott Miller (1998). Supernova. MS-DOS. Apogee Software. Scene: Introduction.
  24. Supernova Instructions, 1998
  25. Scott Miller (1986). Trek Trivia. MS-DOS. Apogee Software. Scene: Instructions.