List of 3D Realms games

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3D Realms is an American video game publisher and developer based in Garland, Texas. It was founded in 1987 as Apogee Software by Scott Miller to publish his game Kingdom of Kroz . Prior to Apogee's founding Miller had released a few games he had developed himself, as well as a couple "packs" of games developed by himself and others, under a shareware distribution model whereby the games were distributed for free in return for donations. [1] These games were inconsistently marketed under the name Apogee Software Productions, though after the company was founded they were sold under the Apogee Software name. [2] Miller found that the standard shareware model was not viable for his games such as Beyond the Titanic (1986) and Supernova (1987), and beginning with Kroz the company pioneered the "Apogee model" of shareware distribution, wherein games were broken up into segments with the first part released for free to drive interest in the other monetized portions. [1]

3D Realms video game developer. Formerly known as Apogee Software (1987–1996)

Apogee Software, Ltd., doing business as 3D Realms since 1996, is an American video game developer and publisher based in Garland, Texas. The company is best known for popularizing the shareware distribution model for video games in the 1980s and 90s, as well as for creating game franchises, such as Duke Nukem. 3D Realms was founded by Scott Miller in 1987 as Apogee Software Productions, in preparation for the release of Kingdom of Kroz. Apogee Software adopted the trading name 3D Realms in 1996, and the rights to the former name and logo were eventually sold to Terry Nagy in 2008, using which he established Apogee Software, LLC.

A video game publisher is a company that publishes video games that have been developed either internally by the publisher or externally by a video game developer. As with book publishers or publishers of DVD movies, video game publishers are responsible for their product's manufacturing and marketing, including market research and all aspects of advertising.

A video game developer is a software developer that specializes in video game development – the process and related disciplines of creating video games. A game developer can range from one person who undertakes all tasks to a large business with employee responsibilities split between individual disciplines, such as programming, design, art, testing, etc. Most game development companies have video game publisher financial and usually marketing support. Self-funded developers are known as independent or indie developers and usually make indie games.

Contents

Soon after its founding, Apogee began publishing titles by other developers in addition to titles by Miller; these developers were often companies composed of a single designer. As Apogee expanded to include more people, some of these designers, such as George Broussard (Micro F/X Software) and Todd Replogle (Scenario Software), joined Apogee as employees and designed its later titles; Broussard joined the company in 1991 as a co-owner. [1] In the 1990s, Apogee was best known for popularizing its shareware model and as the creator of franchises for MS-DOS on the personal computer such as Duke Nukem and as the publisher of games such as Commander Keen and Wolfenstein 3D . [1] [2]

George Broussard is an American video game producer and designer, one of the creators of the Duke Nukem series.

Todd Replogle Video game programmer

Todd Jason Replogle is an American video game programmer, best known as the co-creator of the Duke Nukem series. Replogle graduated from Soquel High School in Soquel, California as a member of the class of 1987.

MS-DOS Discontinued computer operating system

MS-DOS is an operating system for x86-based personal computers mostly developed by Microsoft. Collectively, MS-DOS, its rebranding as IBM PC DOS, and some operating systems attempting to be compatible with MS-DOS, are sometimes referred to as "DOS". MS-DOS was the main operating system for IBM PC compatible personal computers during the 1980s and the early 1990s, when it was gradually superseded by operating systems offering a graphical user interface (GUI), in various generations of the graphical Microsoft Windows operating system.

In 1994, Apogee decided to launch different brand names for each genre of games they published; it created 3D Realms for 3D games, publishing Terminal Velocity in 1995 and developing the 1996 Duke Nukem 3D under the name, with the other titles released in those years still under Apogee. [3] In late 1996, however, Apogee renamed the company itself to 3D Realms to associate their brand with newer, 3D titles. [1] 3D Realms launched a brand for pinball games, Pinball Wizards, in February 1997, but only published Balls of Steel (1997) under the name. [3] Also beginning in 1997, with their licensed Duke Nukem sequels, 3D Realms shifted from episodic MS-DOS titles to non-episodic console and personal computer games. In the process it abandoned the shareware model in favor of a traditional publishing model; it also largely ceased its activities as a developer that same year, releasing only Shadow Warrior (1997). [2] The sole exceptions were Prey (2006), which stayed in development until 2001 when it was transferred to another studio, and Duke Nukem Forever (2011), which famously stayed in development at 3D Realms as vaporware until 2009. [2] [4]

<i>Terminal Velocity</i> (video game) 1995 video game

Terminal Velocity is a simulation video game originally developed by Terminal Reality and published by 3D Realms for DOS and Windows 95 and MacSoft for Mac OS. It is an arcade-style flight combat game, with simpler game controls and physics than flight simulators. It is known for its fast, high-energy action sequences, compared to flight simulators of the time.

<i>Duke Nukem 3D</i> 1996 first-person shooter video game

Duke Nukem 3D is a first-person shooter video game developed by 3D Realms. It is a sequel to the platform games Duke Nukem and Duke Nukem II, published by 3D Realms.

<i>Balls of Steel</i> (video game) video game

Balls of Steel is a pinball computer game developed by Wildfire Studios and released on December 12, 1997. It is the only game to be published under the Pinball Wizards label, a division of Apogee Software.

In July 2008, 3D Realms licensed the Apogee name to the newly formed Apogee Software, which publishes both older Apogee titles and new games. [1] In 2009, financial issues drove 3D Realms to shut down their development department and publishing operations, cancelling Duke Nukem Forever and its publishing involvement in the already announced Earth No More and Prey 2 . [1] [5] In 2014, 3D Realms itself, then focusing on licensing its franchises to other developers, was sold to the investment firm backing Interceptor Entertainment, one of those developers; [6] since then it has published two titles for Interceptor. [7] [8] In 2017, after the closure of Interceptor, 3D Realms announced a return to development with a partnership for Shadow Stalkers, expected in 2018 but later canceled. [9] 3D Realms has since published several titles, and is involved in the development of Wrath: Aeon of Ruin . During its history, 3D Realms has developed or published over 50 games, and granted licenses for 10 more. At least 25 games that 3D Realms was involved with were canceled, with some going on to be finished by other companies.

Apogee Software

Apogee Software, LLC is an American video game publisher based in Rowlett, Texas. The company was founded by Terry Nagy in 2008 after he acquired the rights to the name and logo from 3D Realms.

Earth No More is a first-person shooter video game published by Radar Group.

Prey 2 is a cancelled first-person shooter video game to be published by Bethesda Softworks and planned as a sequel to the 2006 video game Prey.

Video games

Many of the games published under the Apogee name were released as a set of separate episodes, which were purchasable and playable separately or as a group. Titles are listed for games that gave individual names to their episodes instead of episode numbers.

TitleSystemRelease dateDeveloper(s)Ref(s)
Puzzle Fun-Pak
(Asteroids Rescue,Block Five,Maze Machine,Phrase Master) [lower-alpha 1]
PC (MS-DOS)1986Apogee [2]
Adventure Fun-Pak
(Night Bomber,Raiders of the Forbidden Mine,Rogue Runner,The Thing) [lower-alpha 2]
PC (MS-DOS)1986Apogee [2]
Beyond the Titanic PC (MS-DOS)1986Apogee (Scott Miller) [2]
Supernova PC (MS-DOS)1987Apogee (Scott Miller, Terry Nagy) [2]
The Kroz Trilogy
("Kingdom of Kroz","Caverns of Kroz","Dungeons of Kroz") [lower-alpha 3]
PC (MS-DOS)November 26, 1987Apogee (Scott Miller) [2]
Word Whiz PC (MS-DOS)1988Apogee (Scott Miller) [2]
Trivia Whiz PC (MS-DOS)1988Micro F/X Software (George Broussard) [2]
Trek Trivia PC (MS-DOS)1988Apogee (Scott Miller) [2]
Next Generation Trivia PC (MS-DOS)1988Micro F/X Software (George Broussard) [2]
The Thor Trilogy
("Caves of Thor","Realm of Thor","Thor's Revenge")
PC (MS-DOS)1989Scenario Software (Todd Replogle) [2]
The Lost Adventures of Kroz PC (MS-DOS)1990Apogee (Scott Miller) [11]
Monuments of Mars
("First Contact","The Pyramid","The Fortress","The Face")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] January 1, 1990Scenario Software (Todd Replogle) [2] [12]
The Super Kroz Trilogy
("Return to Kroz","Temple of Kroz","The Final Crusade of Kroz") [lower-alpha 5]
PC (MS-DOS)June 1990Apogee (Scott Miller) [1]
Pharaoh's Tomb
("Raiders of the Lost Tomb","Pharaoh's Curse","Temple of Terror","Nevada's Revenge")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] December 14, 1990Micro F/X Software (George Broussard) [2] [15]
Commander Keen in Invasion of the Vorticons
("Marooned on Mars","The Earth Explodes","Keen Must Die!")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 6] December 14, 1990 id Software [17]
Dark Ages
("Prince of Destiny","The Undead Kingdom","Dungeons of Doom")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] February 1, 1991Scenario Software [18]
Jumpman Lives! PC (MS-DOS)June 10, 1991Shamusoft Designs (Dave Sharpless) [19]
Duke Nukem
("Shrapnel City","Mission: Moonbase","Trapped in the Future")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 7] July 1, 1991Apogee [21]
Paganitzu
("Romancing the Rose","The Silver Dagger","Jewel of the Yucatan")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] October 1, 1991 Trilobyte (Keith Schuler) [22]
Arctic Adventure PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] October 9, 1991Apogee [2] [23]
Crystal Caves
("Troubles with Twibbles","Slugging it Out","Mylo Versus the Supernova")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] October 23, 1991Apogee [2]
Commander Keen in Goodbye, Galaxy!
("Secret of the Oracle","The Armageddon Machine")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 6] December 15, 1991 id Software [24]
Secret Agent
("The Hunt for Red Rock Rover","Kill Again Island","Dr. No Body")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] February 1, 1992Apogee [2]
Cosmo's Cosmic Adventure PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] March 1992Apogee [2]
Word Rescue
("Visit Gruzzleville and the Castle","Explore GruzzleBad Caverns","See the Spooky Haunted House")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] March 1992 Redwood Games [2] [25]
Wolfenstein 3D
("Escape from Castle Wolfenstein","Operation: Eisenfaust","Die, Führer, Die!")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 8] May 5, 1992 id Software [33]
Math Rescue
("Visit Volcanoes and Ice Caves","Follow the Gruzzles into Space","See Candy Land")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] October 1992 Redwood Games [2] [25]
ScubaVenture: The Search for Pirate's Treasure PC (MS-DOS)1993Apogee [lower-alpha 9] [35]
Major Stryker
("Lava Planet","Arctic Planet","Desert Planet")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] January 15, 1993Apogee [2] [36]
Monster Bash PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] April 9, 1993Apogee [2]
Bio Menace
("Dr. Mangle's Lab","The Hidden Lab","Master Cain")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] August 3, 1993Apogee [2]
Alien Carnage
("Sewers","Factory","Office Block","Alien Ship") [lower-alpha 10]
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] October 10, 1993Interactive Binary Illusions / SubZero Software [2] [38]
Duke Nukem II PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 11] December 3, 1993Apogee [2] [41]
Blake Stone: Aliens of Gold
("Star Institute","Floating Fortress","Underground Network","Star Port","Habitat 11","Satellite Defense")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] December 3, 1993 JAM Productions [42]
Raptor: Call of the Shadows
("Bravo Sector","Tango Sector","Outer Regions")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 12] April 1, 1994 Cygnus Studios [46]
Hocus Pocus
("Time Tripping","Shattered Worlds","Warped and Weary","Destination Home")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] June 1, 1994Moonlite Software [2] [47]
Mystic Towers
("Rimm","Tor Korad","Nortscar","Wolf's Den","Ebonscarp","Marchwall")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] July 15, 1994 Animation F/X [48]
Wacky Wheels PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] October 17, 1994Beavis Soft [49]
Blake Stone: Planet Strike PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] October 28, 1994 JAM Productions [50]
Boppin'
("Bothersome Hunnybunz","Significant Other of Hunnybunz","Love Child of Hunnybunz","Hunnyvunz Defrocked")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 13] November 15, 1994Accursed Toys [2] [52]
Rise of the Triad
("Approach","Monastery","Caves Below","The Slow and the Dead")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 14] December 21, 1994Apogee [2]
Terminal Velocity PC (MS-DOS / Windows) [lower-alpha 15] May 1, 1995 Terminal Reality [57]
Realms of Chaos
("Revolt of the Myraal","The Goblin Plague","Foray into Fire")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] November 11, 1995Apogee [2]
Xenophage: Alien Bloodsport PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] December 29, 1995Argo Games [58]
Duke Nukem 3D
("L.A. Meltdown","Lunar Apocalypse","Shrapnel City")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 16] January 29, 19963D Realms [lower-alpha 17] [2] [60]
Death Rally PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 18] September 6, 1996 Remedy Entertainment [74]
Stargunner
("Scout Mission","Stellar Attack","Terran Assault","Aquatic Combat")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 4] November 19, 1996Apogee [2]
Shadow Warrior
("Enter the Wang","Code of Honor")
PC (MS-DOS) [lower-alpha 19] May 13, 19973D Realms [lower-alpha 17] [2] [70]
Balls of Steel PC (Windows)December 12, 1997 Wildfire Studios [77]
Max Payne
("The American Dream","A Cold Day in Hell","A Bit Closer to Heaven")
PC (Windows) [lower-alpha 20] July 25, 2001 Remedy Entertainment [lower-alpha 21] [78]
Max Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne
("The Darkness Inside","A Binary Choice","Waking Up from the American Dream")
PC (Windows), PlayStation 2, Xbox October 15, 2003 Remedy Entertainment [lower-alpha 22] [80]
Duke Nukem Mobile [lower-alpha 23] Mobile phones January 15, 2004Machineworks Northwest [81]
Duke Nukem Mobile [lower-alpha 23] Tapwave Zodiac May 2004Machineworks Northwest [81]
Duke Nukem Mobile II: Bikini Project Mobile phones September 2005Machineworks Northwest [83]
Prey PC (Windows), Xbox 360 July 11, 20063D Realms / Human Head Studios [lower-alpha 24] [84]
Duke Nukem Forever PC (Windows / macOS), PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 June 10, 20113D Realms / Triptych Games / Gearbox Software / Piranha Games [lower-alpha 25] [85]
Bombshell [lower-alpha 26] PC (Windows)January 29, 2016 Interceptor Entertainment [8]
Rad Rodgers: World One PC (Windows)December 1, 2016 Interceptor Entertainment [7]
Graveball PC (Windows)June 31, 2018Goin' Yumbo Games [88]
ZIQ PC (Windows / macOS), Nintendo Switch August 1, 2018 [lower-alpha 27] Midnight Sea Studios [89]
Ion Fury PC (Windows / macOS / Linux), PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One August 15, 2019 [lower-alpha 28] Voidpoint [90]
Wrath: Aeon of Ruin PC (Windows / macOS / Linux), PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One TBA 2020 [lower-alpha 29] 3D Realms, KillPixel [92]

Games licensed by 3D Realms

Several spinoff games and remakes, especially in the Duke Nukem series, have been created with 3D Realms granting a license but without serving as the developer or publisher.

TitleSystemRelease dateDeveloperPublisher(s)Ref(s).
Duke Nukem: Time to Kill PlayStation October 12, 1998 n-Space GT Interactive Software [93] [94]
Duke Nukem: Zero Hour Nintendo 64 September 1, 1999 Eurocom GT Interactive Software [95]
Duke Nukem: Land of the Babes PlayStation September 27, 2000 n-Space Infogrames [96] [97]
Duke Nukem: Manhattan Project PC (Windows) [lower-alpha 30] May 21, 2002 Sunstorm Interactive Arush Entertainment [102] [103]
Duke Nukem Advance Game Boy Advance August 12, 2002 Torus Games Take-Two Interactive [104]
Prey Invasion iOS June 7, 2009Machineworks Northwest Hands-On Mobile [105]
Duke Nukem: Critical Mass Nintendo DS April 8, 2011Frontline Studios Deep Silver [106]
Shadow Warrior PC (Windows)September 26, 2013 Flying Wild Hog Devolver Digital [107]
Wacky Wheels HD PC (Windows, macOS)October 26, 2016Ferocity 2DFerocity 2D [108]

Canceled games

Several game projects were begun and abandoned before completion that had Apogee/3D Realms as the developer or publisher. Some of these were later completed by another developer or publisher, though many were not. In addition to these games, there are projects that were conceived but never began development, such as Dino Days (1991) and Commander Keen: The Universe is Toast! (1992), and titles which had preliminary agreements or offers for 3D Realms to publish where a final agreement was never reached either because the project was canceled or another publisher was chosen instead. [109]

TitlePlanned system(s)Cancellation dateDeveloper(s)Ref(s).
The Underground Empire of Kroz PC (MS-DOS)1991Apogee [109]
Gateworld PC (MS-DOS)1992 [lower-alpha 31] Apogee [109]
Fantasy 3D PC (MS-DOS)1993Peter Jungck [109]
Cybertank 3D PC (MS-DOS)1993Frank Maddin [109]
Tubes PC (MS-DOS)1993 [lower-alpha 32] Absolute Magic [109]
BoulderDash 5000 PC (MS-DOS)1993 [109]
Nuclear Nightmare PC (Windows)1993 [109]
Angels Five PC (MS-DOS)1993 [109]
The Second Sword PC (MS-DOS)1993 Cygnus Studios [109]
Wards of Wandaal PC (MS-DOS)1993 [109]
Megaloman PC (MS-DOS)1994Apogee [109]
Monster Bash VGA PC (MS-DOS)1995Apogee [109]
Crazy Baby PC (MS-DOS)1995 [lower-alpha 33] Apogee [109]
Fumes PC (MS-DOS)1995 [109]
Crystal Carnage PC (MS-DOS)1995 [109]
Ruins: Return of the Gods PC (MS-DOS)1995 [lower-alpha 34] 3D Realms [109]
Ravager PC (MS-DOS)1996 [lower-alpha 35] Apogee [109]
Cyberboard Kid PC (MS-DOS)1996 [lower-alpha 36] Apogee [109]
Duke Nukem Forever PC (MS-DOS)1997 [lower-alpha 37] 3D Realms [109]
Blood PC (MS-DOS)1997 [lower-alpha 38] Q Studios [109]
Descent: FreeSpace – The Great War PC (Windows)1998 [lower-alpha 39] Volition [109]
Duke Nukem: Endangered Species Hunter PC (Windows)2001 Action Forms [119]
Duke Nukem: D-Day PlayStation 2 2003 [lower-alpha 40] n-Space [120]
Earth No More PC (Windows), PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 2008 [lower-alpha 41] Recoil Games [5] [122]
Prey 2 PC (Windows), PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 2008 [lower-alpha 41] Human Head Studios [5]
Shadow Stalkers PC (Windows / macOS / Linux), PlayStation 4 2018 [lower-alpha 42] 3D Realms / Zoom [9]

Notes

  1. Asteroids Rescue has also been published as Meteors.
  2. Raiders of the Forbidden Mine has also been published as Raiders of the Lost Mine, Diamond Digger and Gold Miner; Rogue Runner has also been published as Maze Runner.
  3. "Caverns of Kroz" and "Dungeons of Kroz" were initially developed by Miller prior to the founding of Apogee and published through the I.B.Magazette disk magazine as "Kroz" and "Kroz II"; when "Kingdom of Kroz" was released (through Apogee and others such as Softdisk) they were renamed and republished by Apogee. All three titles were updated and republished in 1990 and 1991 in a new order as "Caverns of Kroz II", "Dungeons of Kroz II", and "Kingdom of Kroz II". [10]
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 In 2014, 3D Realms digitally republished several of its DOS titles for Microsoft Windows and macOS. [13] [14]
  5. Like the original Kroz trilogy of episodes, the Super Kroz Trilogy episodes were released under multiple names: "Return to Kroz" was titled "Shrine of Kroz" and "Castle of Kroz" in different publications before Miller settled on a name, and "Temple of Kroz" was also titled "Valley of Kroz". [10]
  6. 1 2 Commander Keen in Invasion of the Vorticons and Commander Keen in Goodbye Galaxy were also released by id Software for Microsoft Windows in 2007. [16]
  7. A port of Duke Nukem was developed and published by Interceptor Entertainment for Microsoft Windows and macOS in 2013. [20]
  8. Wolfenstein 3D was also released by id Software through various publishers other than Apogee/3D Realms for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (1994), Atari Jaguar (1994), Mac OS (1994), Acorn Archimedes (1994), 3DO (1995), PC-98 (1998), Game Boy Advance (2002), Xbox Live Arcade (2009), PlayStation Network (2009), and iOS (2009). [26] [27] [28] [29] [30] [31] [32]
  9. ScubaVenture was developed by Apogee on contract for Softdisk in 1991, and was marketed as a Softdisk game; Apogee developed the title on behalf of id Software in order to let them focus on developing Wolfenstein 3D (1992). [34]
  10. Alien Carnage was initially released as Halloween Harry; in November 1994 it was renamed, with the "Sewers" and "Office Block" episodes switching places to make "Sewers" the first episode. [37]
  11. A port of Duke Nukem II was developed by Torus Games and published by GT Interactive Software as Duke Nukem on the Game Boy Color in 1999, [39] [40] and Interceptor Entertainment developed and published ports for iOS, Microsoft Windows, and macOS in 2013. [20]
  12. Cygnus Studios (then Mountain King Studios) released a version of Raptor: Call of the Shadows for Microsoft Windows in 1999. [43] An iOS port was developed and published by BlitWise Productions in 2010, [44] while a macOS port was developed and published by DotEmu in 2011. [45]
  13. Boppin' was originally published by Karmasoft for the Amiga computer in 1991; the MS-DOS version published by Apogee was an expanded version. Accursed Toys released a Microsoft Windows version for free in 2005. [51]
  14. Rise of the Triad was released as Rise of the Triad: Dark War (to distinguish it from the 2013 remake) by 3D Realms for Microsoft Windows, macOS, and Linux in 2009, [53] and for iOS in 2010. [54]
  15. Terminal Velocity was published for macOS by MacSoft in 1995, [55] and for Android and iOS by Trebuchet Entertainment in 2015. [56]
  16. Duke Nukem 3D has been ported by a variety of developers and publishers to the Game.com (1997), [59] Mac OS (1997), [60] Sega Saturn (1997), [59] PlayStation (as Duke Nukem: Total Meltdown, 1997), [61] Nintendo 64 (as Duke Nukem 64, 1997), [59] Sega Genesis (1998), [62] Xbox 360 (2008), [59] iOS (2009), [59] and Android (2011). [63] An updated version of the game titled Duke Nukem 3D: Atomic Edition was developed and published by 3D Realms in 1996; it added a fourth episode, "The Birth", and the "Plutonium Pack" upgrade was also released to upgrade existing MS-DOS copies. [64] Numerous other expansions and level packs were developed by various creators and released in various venues since the game's release; these were collected along with the Atomic version of the game as Duke Nukem 3D: Megaton Edition for Microsoft Windows (2013), [65] Linux (2013), [66] PlayStation 3 (2015), and PlayStation Vita (2015). [67] The most recent release Duke Nukem 3D: 20th Anniversary World Tour for PlayStation 4 (2016) and Xbox One (2016), consisted of the levels from the Atomic Edition as well as a new fifth episode, "Alien World Order". [68] [69]
  17. 1 2 Duke Nukem 3D and Shadow Warrior were published by GT Interactive Software instead of by 3D Realms. [60] [70]
  18. A port of Death Rally was created by Jari Komppa and released by Remedy Entertainment in 2009. [71] A remake of the game was developed by Mountain Sheep and published by Remedy Entertainment for iOS and Android in 2011. [72] [73]
  19. 3D Realms produced a Mac OS version of Shadow Warrior in 1997. [70] Two expansion packs, Wanton Destruction and Twin Dragon, were developed and by other companies in 1998, with Twin Dragon being released that year and Wanton Destruction abandoned until 2005. [75] [76] In 2012, a Microsoft Windows port was released by Devolver Digital, and General Arcade developed a port of the game for iOS. [70]
  20. Max Payne was ported to the PlayStation 2 (2001), Xbox (2001), macOS (2002), Game Boy Advance (2003), iOS (2012), and Android (2012) without involvement by 3D Realms. [78]
  21. Max Payne was published by 3D Realms as part of the Gathering of Developers publishing group. [78]
  22. Max Payne 2 was developed by Remedy Entertainment and published by Rockstar Games; 3D Realms describes itself as the producer of the game. [79]
  23. 1 2 The name Duke Nukem Mobile was used for both a 2004 mobile game for cell phones and a different 2005 game for the Tapwave Zodiac, both by Machineworks Northwest. The Zodiac game was ported to mobile phones in mid-2005 as Duke Nukem Mobile 3D, and a modified version was released for mobile phones in early 2007 as Duke Nukem Arena. [81] [82]
  24. Prey was published by 2K Games and was developed for 6 years by 3D Realms, with Human Head Studios joining as developers for a further 5 years. It was ported to macOS (2007) and Linux (2008). [84]
  25. Duke Nukem Forever was published by 2K Games and was developed for 13 years by 3D Realms, until the development department was closed in 2009. Development of the game was continued by the developers as Triptych Games, and the game was completed 2 years later by a combination effort by Triptych Games, Gearbox Software, and Piranha Games. [85] Triptych Games released an expansion pack in 2011, The Doctor Who Cloned Me, which added another single player campaign. [86]
  26. Bombshell began development as Duke Nukem: Mass Destruction, before being cancelled in 2014 due to an infringement claim by Gearbox Software, who owned the rights to the Duke Nukem series. After the project was stopped, Interceptor modified it to be unrelated to Duke Nukem. [87]
  27. TBA 2018 on Nintendo Switch.
  28. Ion Fury was released in Early Access on February 28, 2018 under the name Ion Maiden. [90] The game is published by 1C Entertainment on consoles.
  29. The game is scheduled to be released in Early Access in 2019, and is co-published by 1C Entertainment. [91]
  30. Duke Nukem: Manhattan Project was ported to Mac OS (2009), [98] [99] Xbox 360 (2010), [100] and iOS (2014). [101]
  31. After Gateworld's cancellation, the project was finished by Homebrew Software, who released it in 1993. [109] [110]
  32. After Tubes's cancellation, the project was finished by Absolute Magic and published by Software Creations in 1993. [111]
  33. After Crazy Baby's cancellation, the project was finished by New Generation Software and published by CDV Software as Clif Danger in 1996. [109] [112]
  34. After Ruins: Return of the Gods' cancellation, the project was finished by Lobotomy Software and published by Playmates Interactive and BMG Interactive as PowerSlave (Exhumed in Europe and A.D. 1999 in Japan) in 1996 for PC, PlayStation, and Sega Saturn. [109] [113]
  35. After Ravager's cancellation, the project was finished by Inner Circle Creations and published by Softdisk as Alien Rampage in 1996. [109] [114]
  36. After Cyberboard Kid's cancellation, the project was finished and published by Reality Studios as Cyril Cyberpunk in 1996. [109] [115]
  37. Title reused for Duke Nukem Forever , though the games have no other development relationship. [109]
  38. Blood was initially overseen by 3D Realms, but in 1997 Monolith Productions bought the developer and the rights to the game. [116] Blood was published by GT Interactive Software the same year for PC and MacOS. [117]
  39. 3D Realms was initially to be a distributor for Descent (1995), but sold off the rights to Interplay Productions before the game was released. As a part of the deal, 3D Realms reserved the right to publish Parallax Software's next game, which was inherited by Volition when it split from the company and was therefore Descent: FreeSpace. Prior to release, however, Interplay became the actual publisher, with 3D Realms serving as only the merchant of record for a shareware version for the first three months; Interplay bought out the rights to that as well shortly after release. [109] [118]
  40. Duke Nukem: D-Day was planned to be published by Rockstar Games. [120]
  41. 1 2 Earth No More and Prey 2 were announced in 2006 as projects 3D Realms was to publish, but both were sold to Radar Group in 2008. [5] Prey 2 was cancelled in 2011, while no information about Earth No More was ever released. [121]
  42. The game was announced in 2017 with 3D Realms as co-publisher. No information was released since then, aside from Frederik Schreiber's statement on the company's Discord server that 3D Realms is not a publisher anymore.

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<i>Commander Keen in Goodbye, Galaxy</i> video game

Commander Keen in Goodbye, Galaxy is a two-part episodic side-scrolling platform video game developed by id Software and published by Apogee Software in 1991 for DOS. It consists of the fifth and sixth episodes of the Commander Keen series, though they are numbered as the fourth and fifth, as Commander Keen in Keen Dreams is outside of the main continuity. The game follows the titular Commander Keen, an eight-year-old child genius, as he first journeys through the Shadowlands to rescue the Gnosticenes so they may ask the Oracle how the Shikadi plan to destroy the galaxy, and then through the Shikadi's Armageddon Machine to stop them. The two episodes feature Keen running, jumping, and shooting through various levels while opposed by aliens, robots, and other hazards.

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