Eurogamer

Last updated

Eurogamer
Official Eurogamer logo.svg
Type of site
Video game journalism
Available inEnglish
Owner Gamer Network
EditorOli Welsh
Website eurogamer.net
Alexa rankIncrease Negative.svg 2,649 (June 2019) [1]
CommercialYes
RegistrationOptional
Launched4 September 1999;20 years ago (1999-09-04)
Current statusActive

Eurogamer is a video game journalism website owned by Gamer Network, both formed alongside each other in 1999. Its editor is Oli Welsh.

Video game journalism is a branch of journalism concerned with the reporting and discussion of video games, typically based on a core "reveal–preview–review" cycle. With the prevalence and rise of independent media online, online publications and blogs have grown.

Gamer Network British mass media company

Gamer Network Limited is a British mass media company based in Brighton, England. Founded in 1999 by Rupert and Nick Loman, it owns brands—primarily editorial websites—relating to video game journalism and other video game businesses. Its flagship website, Eurogamer, was launched alongside the company. In February 2018, Gamer Network was acquired by ReedPOP.

Contents

History

Kristan Reed served as Eurogamer's editor from 2002 to 2008. Kristan Reed.jpg
Kristan Reed served as Eurogamer's editor from 2002 to 2008.
Tom Bramwell edited Eurogamer from 2008 to 2014. Tom Bramwell 2006.jpg
Tom Bramwell edited Eurogamer from 2008 to 2014.

Eurogamer (initially stylised as EuroGamer) was launched on 4 September 1999. [2] The founding team included John "Gestalt" Bye, the webmaster for the PlanetQuake website and a writer for British magazine PC Gaming World ; Patrick "Ghandi" Stokes, a contributor for the website Warzone; and Rupert "rauper" Loman, who had organised the EuroQuake esports event for the game Quake . [2]

Esports form of competition that is facilitated by electronic systems, particularly video games

Esports is a form of competition using video games. Esports often takes the form of organized, multiplayer video game competitions, particularly between professional players, individually or as teams. Although organized online and offline competitions have long been a part of video game culture, these were largely between amateurs until the late 2000s, when participation by professional gamers and spectatorship in these events through live streaming saw a large surge in popularity. By the 2010s, esports was a significant factor in the video game industry, with many game developers actively designing toward a professional esports subculture.

<i>Quake</i> (video game) 1996 first-person shooter video game developed by id Software

Quake is a first-person shooter video game developed by id Software and published by GT Interactive in 1996. It is the first game in the Quake series. In the game, players must find their way through various maze-like, medieval environments while battling a variety of monsters using an array of weaponry.

In January 2008, Tom Bramwell overtook the role of editor-in-chief from Kristan Reed, remaining in that role until he resigned in November 2014. [3] [4] Since then, Oli Welsh served as editor for Eurogamer. [5]

An editor-in-chief, also known as lead editor or chief editor, is a publication's editorial leader who has final responsibility for its operations and policies. The highest ranking editor of a publication may also be titled editor, managing editor, or executive editor, but where these titles are held while someone else is editor-in-chief, the editor-in-chief outranks the others.

It is known for the EGX, formerly Eurogamer Expo, trade fair organised by its parent company since 2008. [6]

EGX (expo) video game trade fair in the UK

EGX is a trade fair for video games organised by Gamer Network and held annually in the United Kingdom and Germany.

In February 2015, Eurogamer dropped its ten-point scale for review scores in favour of a "recommendation system", in which a game would be labelled as "Essential", "Recommended" or "Avoid". [7]

Sub-outlets

Eurogamer is the principal site of the Gamer Network family of video game-related websites. It has several regional sub-outlets:

Digital Foundry , founded in 2004, has been hosted on Eurogamer since 2007 and is led by Richard Leadbetter. It performs technical analyses of games. [20]

Former

Related Research Articles

<i>Quake III Arena</i> 1999 video game

Quake III Arena is a multiplayer-focused first-person shooter video game released in December 1999. The game was developed by id Software and featured music composed by Sonic Mayhem and Front Line Assembly founder Bill Leeb. Quake III Arena is the third game in the Quake series; it differs from previous games by excluding a story-based single-player mode and highly focusing on multiplayer gameplay. The single-player mode is played against computer-controlled bots.

<i>Quake 4</i> 2005 video game

Quake 4 is a military science fiction first-person shooter video game, the fourth title in the Quake series. The game was developed by Raven Software and published by Activision. Raven Software collaborated with id Software, the creators and developers of preceding Quake games. id Software supervised the development of the game as well as providing the id Tech 4 engine upon which it was built. Quake 4 went gold in early October 2005 and was released on October 18, 2005 for Microsoft Windows and later for Linux and OS X, as well as being a launch title for the Xbox 360. A special DVD Collectors Edition was released, including promotional material and the game Quake II with its expansions, The Reckoning and Ground Zero. The Xbox 360 version of Quake 4 is based on the Special Collectors Edition, and includes Quake II. On August 4, 2011, the game was made available through Steam.

GameSpy defunct video game company

GameSpy was a provider of online multiplayer and matchmaking middleware for video games. The company originated from a Quake fan site founded by Mark Surfas in 1996; after the release of a multiplayer server browser for the game, QSpy, Surfas licensed the software under the GameSpy brand to other video game publishers through a newly established company, GameSpy Industries, which also incorporated his Planet Network of video game news and information websites, and GameSpy.com.

Gabe Newell American computer programmer and businessman

Gabe Logan Newell, commonly known by his nickname Gaben, is an American computer programmer and businessman best known as the co-founder of the video game development and digital distribution company Valve Corporation. Born in Colorado, he attended Harvard University in the early 1980s, but dropped out and soon went to work for the American technology company Microsoft, where he spent the next decade working as a producer for some of their early Windows operating systems.

2K Czech Czech video game developer

2K Czech, s.r.o. was a Czech video game developer based in Brno. Founded as Illusion Softworks in 1997 by Petr Vochozka and Jan Kudera, the company was acquired by Take-Two Interactive in January 2008 and subsequently organised under the 2K label, becoming 2K Czech. The company was merged into Hangar 13 in 2017.

<i>Mario Power Tennis</i> 2004 sports game for the GameCube

Mario Power Tennis, is a sports game developed by Camelot Software Planning and published by Nintendo. The game is the sequel to the Nintendo 64 title Mario Tennis, and is the fourth game in the Mario Tennis series. Power Tennis was released for the GameCube in Japan and North America in late 2004, and in PAL regions in early 2005. The game was ported for the Wii in 2009 as part of the New Play Control! collection, and was also released as part of the Nintendo Selects collection in 2012.

Saber Interactive American video game developer

Saber Interactive Incorporated is an American video game developer based in Maplewood, New Jersey, with additional offices in Saint Petersburg, Madrid, Minsk and Sundsvall. It was founded in 2001 by Andrey Iones, Matthew Karch and Anton Krupkin. Karch serves as chief executive officer for the company. Saber develops and uses a proprietary game engine, the Saber3D engine, which was introduced with TimeShift (2007).

Sumo Digital British independent game development studio based in Sheffield, United Kingdom

Sumo Digital Ltd. is a British video game developer based in Sheffield, England. The company was founded in 2003 by four former members of the management team of Infogrames Studios. As of 2018, Sumo Digital employs more than 500 developers.

<i>Headhunter</i> (video game) video game developed by Amuze

Headhunter is an action-adventure video game developed by Amuze and published by Sega for Dreamcast and PlayStation 2.

<i>Rockstar Games Presents Table Tennis</i> 2006 video game

Rockstar Games Presents Table Tennis is a table tennis simulation video game developed by Rockstar San Diego and published by Rockstar Games. The game was released for the Xbox 360 on May 23, 2006 in North America, and on May 26, 2006 in Europe. It was released for the Wii on October 16, 2007 in North America, and on October 19, 2007 in Europe. The game is a realistic simulation of the sport table tennis, with the main objective to make the opponent fail to hit the ball.

<i>LocoRoco</i> video game

LocoRoco (ロコロコ) is a platform video game developed by SCE Japan Studio and published by Sony Computer Entertainment, which was released worldwide in 2006 for the PlayStation Portable (PSP) handheld game console. The game was developed by Tsutomu Kouno, striving to create a game that was different from other titles being released for the PSP at the time. After demonstrating a prototype of the core gameplay to his management, Kouno was able to complete development over a course of one and a half years. In LocoRoco, the player must tilt the environment by using the shoulder buttons on the PSP in order to maneuver the LocoRoco, multi-colored jelly-like characters, through each level, being aided by other odd residents while avoiding hazards and the deadly Moja Troop, to reach an end goal.

Paul Barnett is an English game designer who is a Global Product Director at Wargaming, working on their game World of Tanks. Before that he worked at Electronic Arts' Office of the Chief Creative Officer and was the General Manager of Mythic Entertainment, a subsidiary of EA. Barnett had a lead role in developing EA's Warhammer Online MMO in Europe.

id Tech series of video game engines

id Tech is a series of separate game engines designed and developed by id Software. Prior to the presentation of the id Tech 5-based game Rage in 2011, the engines lacked official designation and as such were simply referred to as the Doom and Quake engines, from the name of the main game series the engines had been developed for. "id Tech" numbers 1, 2, 3, and 4 have been released as free software under the GNU General Public License, along with the source code to Wolfenstein 3D, Doom, and Quake. id Tech 6 is currently the latest utilized engine after the 2016 Doom reboot.

<i>Gamereactor</i> family of video game magazines

Gamereactor is an international online network covering video games on consoles, PC and mobile. It was started in Denmark in 1998 by Morten Reichel and Claus Reichel - during the early years under the name Gamez.dk. The Magazine and Online site Gamez.dk took over the online sites Gamereactor.dk/.se/.no from Egmont Digital in 2002. Egmont started the sites in 1998. In 2001 they released Gamereactor Magazine in Norway and soon after in Sweden. Since late 2007 Gamereactor has also been available in Finland, and it also launched in Germany in 2009. In 2010 they launched in Italy, and a Portuguese version came online in 2013. Gamereactor later opened outlets in France in November 2016, The Netherlands in January 2017, and China in January 2018.

<i>Free Realms</i> video game

Free Realms was a massive multiplayer online role playing video game, developed by Sony Online Entertainment (SOE) for the PC, Mac, and PlayStation 3, set in a fantasy-themed world named Sacred Grove. The game was released on April 29, 2009 for Windows. The game restricted to free-to-play up to level 20, although there was access to additional game content via a membership fee. The game allowed the player to fight, interact with other players, and more. The game was shut down on March 31, 2014; SOE stated that It didn't have the resources to keep the game going.

<i>Buzz!: The Schools Quiz</i> video game

Buzz!: The Schools Quiz is an educational game based on the popular Buzz! series of games. The game was developed by Relentless Software in association with the UK Government's Department for Education and Skills (DfES). The game's 5,000 questions are based on the Key Stage 2 Curriculum that covers children between the ages of 7 and 11 years.
Although the game is published by Sony the development cost were covered by Relentless themselves and a Government grant from DfES to fund the initial prototype.

Sony is publishing it. But we've funded it ourselves to get it out there. We really wanted to do something positive and this was a great opportunity afforded to us by the government. We don't make a penny from the version in schools but we will make money from retail sales if it sells well.

WISHES stands for Web-based Information Service for Higher Education Students (WISHES). As a European Project run by nine European institutions WISHES centrally promotes European work and study offers for students worldwide by means of a user-driven web-based information portal. Based on the expressed needs of over 4.000 students, this WISHES web-portal centralizes information and creates profiles of European higher education institutions (HEIs) and employment bodies, tailored to Bologna and Lisbon parameters.

<i>Grid 2</i> video game

Grid 2 is a racing video game developed and published by Codemasters for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and the Xbox One, via backwards compatibility. It is the eighth game in the TOCA series. On 25 September 2014, Feral Interactive released the Reloaded Edition for OS X.

References

  1. "Eurogamer Competitive Analysis, Marketing Mix and Traffic". Alexa Internet . Retrieved 30 June 2019.
  2. 1 2 Eurogamer staff (4 September 1999). "EuroGamer opens!". Eurogamer.
  3. Martin, Matt (14 January 2008). "Bramwell steps up to editor role at Eurogamer.net". GamesIndustry.biz .
  4. Yin-Poole, Wesley (28 November 2014). "Eurogamer vs Tom Bramwell". Eurogamer.
  5. Eurogamer staff (17 August 2010). "The Eurogamer Staff". Eurogamer.
  6. Bowden, Mike (20 October 2008). "Loman on EE2008: "Our biggest inspiration is probably the Penny Arcade Expo"". VG247 .
  7. Welsh, Oli (10 February 2015). "Eurogamer has dropped review scores". Eurogamer.
  8. "Eurogamer.cz". Eurogamer.cz.
  9. "Eurogamer.de". Eurogamer.de.
  10. Bramwell, Tom (4 August 2006). "Eurogamer.de announced". Eurogamer.
  11. "Eurogamer.dk". Eurogamer.dk.
  12. Gibson, Ellie (25 June 2009). "Eurogamer Denmark launches". Eurogamer.
  13. "Eurogamer.es". Eurogamer.es.
  14. "Eurogamer.it". Eurogamer.it.
  15. "Eurogamer Benelux". Eurogamer.nl.
  16. Bramwell, Tom (18 August 2008). "Eurogamer Benelux launches!". Eurogamer.
  17. "Eurogamer.pl". Eurogamer.pl.
  18. "Eurogamer.pl". Eurogamer.pl.
  19. Gibson, Ellie (21 May 2008). "New Eurogamer Portugal site launches". Eurogamer.
  20. "Help & Frequently Asked Questions". Digital Foundry.
  21. Loureiro, Jorge (1 March 2013). "Eurogamer Network é agora Gamer Network" [Eurogamer Network is now Gamer Network]. Eurogamer.pt (in Portuguese).
  22. Eurogamer staff (25 October 2007). "Eurogamer France launches!". Eurogamer.
  23. "Eurogamer.ro". Eurogamer.ro. Archived from the original on 7 November 2010.
  24. Göransson, Andréas (11 December 2016). "Eurogamer.se lägger ner – tack för att du läste" [Eurogamer.se closes – thank you for reading]. Eurogamer.se (in Swedish).