List of rivers of the Rocky Mountains

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The Cathedral Group of the Teton Range in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. Grand Tetons11.jpg
The Cathedral Group of the Teton Range in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.

This is a partial list of rivers of the Rocky Mountains in Canada and the United States. For a full listing of rivers in the Canadian portion of the range, see List of rivers of the Canadian Rockies.

Contents

Gulf of Mexico drainage

Arctic Ocean drainage

Northwest Pacific Ocean drainage

Gulf of California drainage

Hudson Bay drainage

Great Basin drainage

See also

Related Research Articles

South Platte River Principal tributary of the Platte River

The South Platte River is one of the two principal tributaries of the Platte River. Flowing through the U.S. states of Colorado and Nebraska, it is itself a major river of the American Midwest and the American Southwest/Mountain West. Its drainage basin includes much of the eastern flank of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado; much of the populated region known as the Colorado Front Range and Eastern Plains; and a portion of southeastern Wyoming in the vicinity of the city of Cheyenne. It joins the North Platte River in western Nebraska to form the Platte, which then flows across Nebraska to the Missouri. The river serves as the principal source of water for eastern Colorado. In its valley along the foothills in Colorado, it has permitted agriculture in an area of the Colorado Piedmont and Great Plains that is otherwise arid.

South Saskatchewan River river in Alberta and Saskatchewan

The South Saskatchewan River is a major river in Canada that flows through the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

North Platte River major tributary of the Platte River

The North Platte River is a major tributary of the Platte River and is approximately 716 miles (1,152 km) long, counting its many curves. In a straight line, it travels about 550 miles (890 km), along its course through the U.S. states of Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska.

Wind River Range mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in western Wyoming in the United States

The Wind River Range, is a mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in western Wyoming in the United States. The range runs roughly NW–SE for approximately 100 mi (160 km). The Continental Divide follows the crest of the range and includes Gannett Peak, which at 13,802 ft (4,207 m), is the highest peak in Wyoming; and also Fremont Peak at 13,750 ft (4,191 m), the third highest peak in Wyoming. There are more than 40 other named peaks in excess of 12,999 ft (3,962 m). With the exception of the Grand Teton in the Teton Range, the next 19 highest peaks in Wyoming after Gannett are also in the Winds.

Bear Creek or Bearcreek may refer to:

Middle Fork South Platte River river in the United States of America

The Middle Fork South Platte River is a tributary of the South Platte River, approximately 50 miles (80 km) long, located in central Colorado in the United States. The river provides part of the drainage of South Park, the intermontane grassland basin located between the Front Range and the Mosquito Range in the Rocky Mountains southwest of Denver.

Gros Ventre group of indigenous people in northern Montana

The Gros Ventre, also known as the Aaniiih, A'aninin, Haaninin, Atsina, and White Clay are a historically Algonquian-speaking Native American tribe located in north central Montana. Today the Gros Ventre people are enrolled in the Fort Belknap Indian Community of the Fort Belknap Reservation of Montana, a federally recognized tribe with 3,682 enrolled members, that also includes Assiniboine people or Nakoda people, the Gros Ventre's historical enemies. The Fort Belknap Indian Reservation is in the northernmost part of Montana, just south of the small town of Harlem, Montana.

Triple Divide Peak (Montana) Mountaun in Montana, United States. Located at the hydrological apex of North America.

Triple Divide Peak is located in the Lewis Range, part of the Rocky Mountains in North America. The peak is a feature of Glacier National Park in the state of Montana in the United States. The summit of the peak, the hydrological apex of the North American continent, is the point where two of the principal continental divides in North America converge, the Continental Divide of the Americas and the Northern or Laurentian Divide.

Big Wood River river in Idaho, United States

The Big Wood River is a 137-mile-long (220 km) river in central Idaho, United States, that is a tributary of the Malad River.

Centennial Mountains

The Centennial Mountains are the southernmost sub-range of the Bitterroot Range in the United States states of Idaho and Montana. The Centennial Mountains include the Western and Eastern Centennial Mountains. The range extends east from Monida Pass along the Continental Divide to Henrys Fork 48 km (30 mi) NNW of Ashton, Idaho; bounded on the west by Beaver Creek, on the north by Centennial Valley and Henrys Lake Mountains, on the east by Henrys Lake Flat, and on the south by Shotgun Valley and the Snake River Plain. The highest peak in the range is Mount Jefferson.

Montana valley and foothill grasslands

The Montana valley and foothill grasslands are an ecoregion of northwestern North America in the northern United States and southern Canada.