Lone Scouts

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Lone Scouts are members of the Scout movement who are in isolated areas or otherwise do not participate in a regular Scouting unit or organization. A Lone Scout must meet the membership requirements of the Scouting organization to which they belong and have an adult Scout leader or counselor who may be a parent, guardian, minister, teacher, or another adult. The leader or counselor instructs the boy and reviews all steps of Scouting advancement. Lone Scouts can be in the Scout Section or sections for older young people, and in some countries in the Cub section or sections for younger boys. They follow the same program as other Scouts and may advance in the same way as all other Scouts.

Contents

Lone Scouts exist in many countries in the world, including Australia, the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States.

History

John Hargrave was the inspirator of the Lone Scouts. Hargrave wrote a series of articles for "Lone Scouts", held Lonecraft Camps and wrote Lonecraft, the handbook for Lone Scouts, published in 1913. [1] Hargrave's book referred to individual Lone Scouts and Lone Patrols. Hargrave dedicated his book to naturalist Ernest Thompson Seton, founder of the Woodcraft League. Hargrave was an early Boy Scout and, in 1917, became Commissioner for Woodcraft and Camping in the Baden-Powell Boy Scouts but Baden-Powell and his organization refused to recognize Hargrave's Lone Scouts and Woodcraft Scouting. [2] Hargrave, a Quaker pacifist and medical corps war veteran of the disastrous 1915 Gallipoli Campaign, became increasingly disenchanted with the military dominated leadership and militarism of the Baden-Powell Boy Scouts and in February, 1919, he held a meeting of like-minded Scout leaders. In 1920 Hargrave formed the Kindred of the Kibbo Kift and in January 1921 he was expelled from Baden-Powell's organization. Many Lone Scouts disassociated from the Baden-Powell organization, some joined Hargrave's Kibbo Kift while others joined the British Boy Scouts, other National Peace Scouts or remained independent Scouts and patrols.

The term "Lone Scout" was later officially adopted by Baden-Powell's Boy Scouts Association.

The Lone Scouts of America were formed in 1915 by William D. Boyce, a Chicago newspaper entrepreneur.[ citation needed ] This organization merged with the Boy Scouts of America in 1924; its mission has been carried on through the BSA Lone Cub Scout and Lone Boy Scout programs.[ citation needed ]

US Criteria

Boys/Girls (in the USA) who are eligible to become Lone Scouts include: [3]

See also

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History of the Boy Scouts of America Wikimedia history article

The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) was inspired by and modeled on the Boy Scout Association, established by Baden-Powell in Britain in 1908. In the early 1900s, several youth organizations were active, and many became part of the BSA.

Non-aligned Scouting organizations is a term used by the World Organization of the Scout Movement (WOSM), World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) and their member national organizations to refer to Scouting organizations that are not affiliated with them. See List of non-aligned Scouting organizations.

The Scout and Guide movement in Jamaica is served by

Ruth Clark was the author of the first woodcraft book for girls and an active original member of the Kibbo Kift.

There are many national organisations in the United Kingdom that have been established to provide services to people under the age of 18.

References

  1. John Hargrave, Lonecraft, the handbook for Lone Scouts, Constable and Company Ltd, London, 1913
  2. Tim Jeal, Baden-Powell, Hutchinson, London, 1989 pp501-502
  3. "Scouting". scouting.org.