Brownies (Scouting)

Last updated

Associazione Guide e Scouts Cattolici Italiani Coccinelle at Lombardy Regional Meeting Coccinelle Volo Regionale Lombardo 2007.jpg
Associazione Guide e Scouts Cattolici Italiani Coccinelle at Lombardy Regional Meeting

Brownies are the section in the Girl Guides (or in the United States, Girl Scouts) organization for girls aged seven years old to ten years old. [1] Exact age limits are slightly different in each organization.

Contents

History

Brownies, originally called Rosebuds, [2] were first organized by Lord Baden-Powell in 1914, to complete the range of age groups for girls in Scouting. They were first run as the youngest group in the Guide Association by Agnes Baden-Powell, Lord Baden-Powell's younger sister. In 1918 his wife, Lady Olave Baden-Powell, took over the responsibility for the Girl Guides and thus for Brownies.

Originally the girls were called Rosebuds, but were renamed by Lord Baden-Powell after the girls had complained that they didn't like their name. Their name comes from the story "The Brownies" by Juliana Horatia Ewing, written in 1870. In the story two children, Tommy and Betty, learn that children can be helpful brownies instead of being lazy boggarts.

Italian history

In Italy, the term was maintained and also extended to boys, coexisting with Wolf Cubs.

United Kingdom

A Brownies field trip at Ellesmere in 1954 Brownie Revels at Ellesmere (7453191908).jpg
A Brownies field trip at Ellesmere in 1954

In the United Kingdom, Brownies were originally called Rosebuds. [2] Rosebuds was started in 1914 and was originally for girls aged 8–11. Rosebuds was renamed to Brownies in 1915. [2] In 1937 Princess Margaret became the first royal Brownie. [3]

Brownies is the second youngest section of Girlguiding in the UK; for girls aged 7–10. They work in small groups called sixes. Each six is either named after Fairies or woodland creatures. A six is led by a Sixer and has a Second who acts as deputy. The Brownie programme is called the Brownie Adventure. It is split into 3 parts: [4] you, community, world.

Brownies work towards interest badges, as of 2016 there are 57. These can be done in meetings with the unit or at home or in clubs such as swimming. Brownies can also work towards their Adventure badges. These are gained over a period of time and require girls to complete many different activities, such as going on an adventure, taking part in an activity with another unit and earning an interest badge.

There are a few Brownie songs that some packs sing at the beginning of the meeting:

Come let us make a Brownie ring, a Brownie Ring a Brownie Ring
Come let us make a Brownie Ring, we hear our Brown Owl Calling.
Under the Brownie bridge we go, bridge we go, bridge we go
Under the Brownie bridge we go, because we are the..... (name of six is entered)

This is usually sung as each six skips under the brownie bridge and into the circle. It is often followed by the next song:

We're Brownie Guides, we're Brownie Guides
We're here to lend a hand
To love our God and serve our Queen
And to help our homes and land
We're Brownie friends, we're Brownie friends
In North, South, East and West
We're joined together in our wish
To try to do our best

There are slight variations of the songs.

Some packs also sing one of the traditional songs to end a meeting, to the tune of the Cambridge Chimes:

O Lord, our God
Thy children call
Grant us Thy peace
And bless us all
O Lord, this week
Thy children seek
Good deeds to do
And to be true
Good-night (everyone then salutes each other)

Motto, Promise and Law

Australia

In Australia (where girls of all ages are now called Girl Guides) the Guiding Promise is:

I promise that I will do my best;
To be true to myself and develop my beliefs,
To serve my community and Australia,
and live by the Guide law.

Prior to 2012, the Promise was:

I promise that I will do my best;
To do my duty to God,
To serve the Queen and my country
To help other people
and keep the Guide law.

The Brownie Guide Law, prior to 1996, was:

A Brownie Guide thinks of others before herself and should do a good turn everyday.

The Brownie Promise 1990:

I promise to do my best

To do my duty to God

To serve my Queen & my country

To help other people

And to do a good deed every day.

Motto 1990: Be prepared.


The Brownie Guide Motto, prior to 1996, was:

Lend a hand

The Guide Law, Promise and Motto, which are followed by all ages of the guiding movement after 1996, are the Laws, Promise and Motto relating to the guide age group.

Canada

Brownie uniforms from Canada from the 2000s Brownie points Montreal, Canada.jpg
Brownie uniforms from Canada from the 2000s

In Girl Guides of Canada, the Brownie Promise is: [5]

I promise to do my best,
To be true to myself, my beliefs and Canada,
I will take action for a better world,
And respect the Brownie Law.

The Canadian Brownie Law is:

As a Brownie I am honest and kind. I help take care of the world around me.

The Canadian Brownie Motto is:

Lend a Hand

Old Promise:

The old Brownie Promise is from the 1950s

I promise to do my best,
To do my duty to God and the Queen [or "to God, the Queen, and my country"]
To help other people every day, especially those at home.

The English Brownie Law is:

A brownie guide thinks of others before herself and does a good turn every day.

The English Brownie Motto is:

"Lend A Hand" (LAH)

Hong Kong

In Hong Kong, the Brownie Promise is:

I will promise to do my best,
To be true to myself,
To my God, and my country, and the country in which I live,
To help others and to keep the Brownie Guide Law.

The Law is:

As a Brownie Guide,
I will care for my home, my community and myself.
I will do a good turn every day.

Ireland

In Ireland, the Brownie Promise is:

I promise to do my best,
To do my duty to my God and my country,
To help those at home everyday,
And to obey the Brownie Guide Law.

The word 'God' can be replaced by the word 'faith' according to one's spiritual beliefs. [6]

The Irish Brownie Motto is:

Lend a Hand

Singapore

The Singaporean Brownie Promise is:

I promise to do my best,

To do my duty to God,

To serve my country,

And to help other people,

and to keep the Brownie Law.

The Singaporean Brownie Law is:

A brownie obeys and respect her elders.
A brownie thinks of others before herself.
A brownie tells the truth.
A brownie is neat and tidy.
A brownie is thrifty.
A brownie plays and works cheerfully.

The Singaporean Brownie Motto is:Lend a hand

United Kingdom

An idealistic scene from the 1930s illustrating historic costumes: Bekonscot model village Brownies and maypole, Bekonscot.JPG
An idealistic scene from the 1930s illustrating historic costumes: Bekonscot model village

In the United Kingdom, the Brownie Promise is:

I promise that I will do my best:
To be true to myself and develop my beliefs,
To serve the Queen and my community,
To help other people
and
To keep the Brownie Guide Law.

After a wide public consultation in spring 2013, the promise wording was changed for all sections.

The Brownie promise before September 2013 was:

I promise that I will do my best:
To love my God,
To serve The Queen and my country
To help other people,
And to keep the Brownie Guide Law.

The Brownie Guide Law is:

A Brownie Guide thinks of others before herself and does a good turn every day.

The Brownie Guide Motto used to be 'Lend a hand' (LAH). With the introduction of the new programme in the United Kingdom, the motto was dropped for Brownies.

United States

In the United States, Brownies use the same Promise and Law as the other age groups of the Girl Scouts of the USA. [7]

Girl Scout Promise:

On my honor, I will try:
To serve God and my country,
To help people at all times,
And to live by the Girl Scout Law. [7]

Girl Scout Law:

I will do my best to be
honest and fair,
friendly and helpful,
considerate and caring,
courageous and strong, and
responsible for what I say and do,
and to
respect myself and others,
respect authority,
use resources wisely,
make the world a better place, and
be a sister to every Girl Scout. [7]

Related Research Articles

Scouting World-wide movement for the education of youth

The Scout movement, also known as Scouting or the Scouts, is a voluntary non-political educational movement for young people. Although it requires an oath of allegiance to a nation's political leaders and, in some countries, to a god, it otherwise allows membership without distinction of gender, race or origin in accordance with the principles of its founder, Lord Baden-Powell. The purpose of the Scout Movement is to contribute to the development of young people in achieving their full physical, intellectual, emotional, social and spiritual potentials as individuals, as responsible citizens and as members of their local, national and international communities. During the first half of the twentieth century, the movement grew to encompass three major age groups for boys: Cub Scout, Boy Scout and Rover Scout. In 1910, the Girl Guides was created, encompassing three major age groups for girls: Brownie Guide, Girl Guide and Girl Scout and Ranger Guide. It is one of several worldwide youth organizations.

Scout Promise

Since the publication of Scouting for Boys in 1908, all Scouts and Girl Guides around the world have taken a Scout promise or oath to live up to ideals of the movement, and subscribed to a Scout Law. The wording of the Scout Promise and Scout Law have varied slightly over time and from country to country. Some national organization promises are given below. Although most Scouting and Guiding organizations use the word "promise", a few such as the Boy Scouts of America tend to use "oath" instead. Typically, Scouts and Guides will make the three-fingered Scout Sign when reciting the promise.

Girlguiding charity for girls and young women in the UK

Girlguiding is the operating name of The Guide Association, previously named The Girl Guides Association and is the national guiding organisation of the United Kingdom. It is the UK's largest girl-only youth organisation. Girlguiding is a charitable organisation.

Kenya Scouts Association

The Kenya Scouts Association is the national Scouting association of Kenya. Scouting was founded in British East Africa in 1910 and became a member of the World Organization of the Scout Movement in 1964. It has 323,929 members.

Girl Guides of Canada is the national Guiding association of Canada. Guiding in Canada started in September 7, 1910 and GGC was among the founding members of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) in 1928.

Pfadfinder und Pfadfinderinnen Liechtensteins

Pfadfinder und Pfadfinderinnen Liechtensteins is the national Scouting and Guiding association of Liechtenstein. Scouting in Liechtenstein started in 1931, and Guiding followed in 1932. The Boy Scouts became a member of the World Organization of the Scout Movement in 1933, and the Guides joined the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts in 1952. In 1989 both organizations merged and formed the present Pfadfinder und Pfadfinderinnen Liechtensteins. The PPL has about 1,100 members of both sexes and is organised in ten troops.

Hong Kong Girl Guides Association organization

Hong Kong Girl Guides Association (香港女童軍總會) is the sole Guide organisation in Hong Kong. It was formally established in 1919 though the first Girl Guides Company was formed in 1916. The association became a full member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts in 1978. It serves 55,145 members.

Scouting and Guiding on Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha

Scouting and Guiding in Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha is administered by the United Kingdom Scout Association and Girlguiding UK, due to Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha's affiliations as a British Overseas Territory.

Girl Guides Australia Movement for girls and young women

Girl Guides Australia (GGA) is the national Guiding organisation in Australia. Its mission is to empower girls and young women to grow into confident, self-respecting members of the community. Membership is open to all girls and young women from all cultures, faiths and traditions. Guiding groups formed in Australia as early as 1909, and by 1920 Girl Guide Associations had been formed in six states. In 1926 the State Associations federated and formed a national organization which became a founding member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts in 1928. It has 30,000 members including 18,000 youth members, aged 5 to 17. Over a million Australian women are or have been Guides. The Girl Guide emblem incorporates the Commonwealth Star.

GirlGuiding New Zealand organization

GirlGuiding New Zealand is the national Guiding organisation in New Zealand. GirlGuiding New Zealand currently splits New Zealand into 8 regions around the country with approximately 10,000 members.

Religion in Scouting

Religion in Scouting and Guiding is an aspect of the Scout method that has been practiced differently and given different interpretations over the years.

The Girl Guides Association of Jamaica

The Girl Guides Association of Jamaica (GGAJ) is the Guiding organisation of Jamaica. It served 5,903 members. Founded in 1915, the girls-only organisation became an associate member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts in 1963 and a full member in 1966.

A Ranger or Ranger Guide is a member of a section of some Guiding organisations who is between the ages of 14–18. It is the female-centred equivalent of the Rover Scouts.

Girl Guides Singapore organization

Girl Guides Singapore is the national Guiding organization of Singapore. It serves 12,340 members. Founded in 1917, the girls-only organization became a full member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts in 1966. Formerly named The Singapore Girl Guides Association, the association took on its present name on 24 July 2004.

The Nigerian Girl Guides Association organization

The Nigerian Girl Guides Association is the national Guiding organization of Nigeria. It serves 113,726 members. Founded in 1919, the girls-only organization became a full member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts in 1966.

Girl Guides Association of Zimbabwe organization

The Girl Guides Association of Zimbabwe (GGAZ) is the national Guiding organisation of Zimbabwe. It serves 15,267 members. Founded in 1912, the girls-only organisation became a full member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts as the Girl Guides Association of Rhodesia in 1969. The Wayfarers, a sort of Guiding for native African girls began in 1926 after a visit to the colony by Olave Baden-Powell. In 1935 there were some 600 Wayfarers and 300 Sunbeams, the African equivalent of Brownies in Guiding. In 1940, the two movements started to merge; this process was completed in 1950. The name of the association changed in 1981 from the Girl Guides Association of Rhodesia to the Girl Guides Association of Zimbabwe.

Rainbows is the youngest section of GirlGuiding in the UK. They are between the ages of 5 and 7 in England, Scotland and Wales, but in Northern Ireland the age range is 4-7 years old. It is the Guiding equivalent of the Beaver Scouts. At the age of about seven, a Rainbow will usually become a Brownie.

Girl Scouts of Jamaica organization for Girl Scouts in Jamaica

Girl Scouts of Jamaica (G.S.J.) is a Christian faith based Scouting organization for girls in Jamaica founded on August 5, 2008. The girls-only organization is a member of the Order of World Scouts.

Girl Guides Movement for girls and young women

Girl Guides is a movement found worldwide, which was originally and still largely designed for girls and women only. This organization was introduced in 1909, because girls demanded to take part in the then grassroots Boy Scout Movement.

Grand Howl scout and guide ceremony

The Grand Howl is a ceremony used by Cub Scouts and Brownies. It was devised by Robert Baden-Powell, the author of the scouting guide Scouting for Boys, and is based on the Mowgli stories in Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Book. In the ceremony, Cubs act out the wolves greeting Akela, the "Old Wolf", at the Council Rock and are reminded of the Cub Scout Promise. Baden-Powell also created a Grand Howl for Brownie Guides, which was in imitation of an owl instead of a wolf. It has been used as an opening and closing ceremony as well as a method of conveying thanks or appreciation by all sections of Scouting.

References

  1. "BROWNIES (7-10)". girlguiding.org.uk. Archived from the original on 12 September 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 "The history of changing girls' lives". Girlguiding. Archived from the original on 25 February 2012. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  3. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 23 September 2010. Retrieved 18 April 2016.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. "Brownies (7-10)". Girlguiding. Archived from the original on 8 August 2016. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  5. Inc., Advanced Solutions International. "News". www.girlguides.ca. Archived from the original on 29 February 2012. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  6. "Brownies - Irish Girl Guides". irishgirlguides.ie. Archived from the original on 16 December 2016. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  7. 1 2 3 Girl Scout Promise and Law Archived 8 November 2014 at the Wayback Machine accessed 9 November 2014.