Obsolete Serbian units of measurement

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A number of units of measurement were used in Serbia to measure length, weight, etc. Metrication was carried out in 1873 in Serbia. [1]

Serbia Republic in Southeastern Europe

Serbia, officially the Republic of Serbia, is a country situated at the crossroads of Central and Southeast Europe in the southern Pannonian Plain and the central Balkans. The sovereign state borders Hungary to the north, Romania to the northeast, Bulgaria to the southeast, North Macedonia to the south, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina to the west, and Montenegro to the southwest. The country claims a border with Albania through the disputed territory of Kosovo. Serbia's population is about seven million., most of whom are Orthodox Christians. Its capital, Belgrade, ranks among the oldest and largest citiеs in southeastern Europe.

Contents

System before metric system

A number of units were used.

Length

One notable unit was archine. One archine was 28.0 in (0.711 m). [2]

Mass

Some units of mass are given below:

1 litra = 100 drachm

1 oka = 4 litra = 2.8188 lb = 1.2786 kg. [2]

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References

  1. "Metrication - Europa". Metric Pioneer. Retrieved 8 February 2015.
  2. 1 2 Clarke, F.W. (1891). Weights Measures and Money of All Nations. New York: D. Appleton & Company. p. 68.