Phalee

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Phalee

Phadang
Village
Phalee Village.jpg
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Phalee
Location in Manipur, India
India location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Phalee
Phalee (India)
Coordinates: 25°08′33″N94°17′02″E / 25.14250°N 94.28389°E / 25.14250; 94.28389 Coordinates: 25°08′33″N94°17′02″E / 25.14250°N 94.28389°E / 25.14250; 94.28389
CountryFlag of India.svg  India
State Manipur
District Ukhrul
Population
  Total3,742
Languages
  Official Phalee Tangkhul
Time zone UTC+5:30 (IST)
PIN
795144
Vehicle registration MN
Nearest cityUkhrul
Literacy81.35%
Lok Sabha constituencyOuter Manipur
Vidhan Sabha constituencyChingai
Website manipur.gov.in

Phalee also called as Phadang is a village located west of Ukhrul in Ukhrul district, Manipur state in India. It lies in the Indo-Burma Biodiversity Hot-Spot Region of the world wherein the flora and fauna diversity are very rich. [1] It occupies total area of about 49 sq. km. It has Red Sandy Soils and annual rainfall of 2000-2400mm. It has subtropical pine forest climate with distinct four seasons. The average temperature is in the range of 23°C. It experienced reverse monsoon in winter and four distinct seasons. As per 2011 census, [2] the village has a total of 794 households with 3742 persons of which 1934 are male while 1808 are female. Of the total population, 11.60% are in the age group of 0–6 years. The average sex ratio of the village is 904 female per 1000 male. The literacy rate of the village is 81.35%. [2] Phalee is flanked by Ngaimu and Tolloi in the East, Somdal and Hoomi north, Tuinem and Lamlang in the south and Champhung and Tora in the west. The village is assumed to be more than 600 years (approximate) since the first settler settled in relation to the sixteen generation back. The village has a total of 794 households with 3742 persons of which 1934 are male while 1808 are female.

Contents

Organization

It is a small village which values democracy that is evidently clear from its diverse organizations within the village. It has its own customary constitution for their village functioning.

Phalee Biodiversity Management Committee (Phalee BMC) is an organisation which is elected by the villagers to work on Environment and Biodiversity [6] conservation of the village in accordance with the Biological Diversity Act, 2002. [3] [7] It also works on recording and documentation of the village and surrounding areas flora and fauna. It is the first institute among the villages of Ukhrul District that established Biodiversity Zone, [4] recorded, documented and cataloged flora and fauna of the region on its founded group Rainforest Biodiversity of Phalee [5] within India Biodiversity Portal. [8] [5] Some of the main objectives of Phalee BMC are Preservation, Conservation, and Education of Biodiversity and People’s Culture . It also works on village Heritage. [4]

Religion and educational institutions

Phalee is one of the Tangkhul villages that embraced Christianity very early. For this, the villagers got access to western education right from the coming of Christian missionaries to Ukhrul district [9] .According to the 2011 census, the literacy rate of the village was 81.35% which is higher than the state's average of 76.94%. [2]

People and occupation

The village is home to people of Tangkhul Naga tribe and speak Tangkhul language [10] [11] .Agriculture is the primary occupation of the inhabitants. Rice, maize, potato, and cabbage are the main crops grown in Phalee. [12] The traditional farming system has been an integral part of this village livelihood since time immemorial and accordingly, it is closely interwoven with the intricate fabric of the society in culture, religions, and economy. [13] The farming system covers wet paddy cultivation, slash and burn (jhuming) and the other allied agricultural activities comprising forest gathering, artisanship, crop festivals, kitchen gardening, domestication of birds and animals, fisheries, and rearing of edible insects. [14] Rearing edible six-legged insects like Asian giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia), honey bees, green grasshoppers, etc.

Most of these practices are social and community-based activity and their importance is pertinently expressed in their various culture. [15] They are very old practices and the production system are generally trivial, merely a paltry self-sufficient to safeguard the basic level of survival. The agriculture system is stagnated which is proved by the unremitting abject poverty of the village life [16] plagued with malnutrition, ill health and lack of basic amenities like telecommunications, transport, and marketing. [13] However, in recent year there is a tremendous improvement in the rearing of the domestic animal and bird and especially fishery, producing approximately 1000 kg of fish (common carp and other local variety) per year. [17] It is of one the village that upholds afforestation programme with Government agencies with huge success and one of the villages that planted the highest number of trees thus far. [18]

Artisanship is one of the old traditional practises of this village which include weaving, blacksmith, bamboo weaving, stone and wood carving works etc. [19] The artisanship constitute one of the basic scale of their development index in the past.

Culture

Luira Phanit or the seed-sowing festival is perhaps still one of the biggest traditional festivals of the Tangkhuls Naga which are celebrated every year with great pomp and joy. This is a festival celebrated in every Tangkhul village at the beginning of the year though with some modifications now (the date of celebration differs from village to village), precisely to herald the coming of a new year and to commemorate the beginning of sowing the first seed for the coming year [20] .This is the main agricultural festival of the year and its celebration spread over a period of about eleven days in the olden days though the celebration does not extend that much longer nowadays.

Since the advent of Christianity [21] and in the years that followed, an understanding between the Christians and the non-Christians of this village was brought about in regard to the fixation of the date for its celebration wherein, 15 – 20 March of every year was exclusively set aside for this festival of which, hitherto it was usually celebrated a little earlier than this. So it's almost a week-long celebration and even now the intensity of the celebration is quite immense. Some of the competition items during the festival includes folk song (this includes Yarra Laa, Ngakhakva Laa and Phalee Awungashi Laa), folk dance, Luita Laa, high jump, long jump, wrestling, bamboo climbing, carrying rice pounding stick on the back, tug of war, trumpet, flute, violin, guitar and many more. [12] Tug of war is one showpiece of an event that really captivates the hearts of the audience with equal numbers of men and women at each end of the rope trying to pull with their utmost strength.

The dying giant may not figuratively represent a human giant but it’s about the practice, tradition of carrying a giant load of paddy [22] (Lengvei Kaphung) a popular age-old practice among Tangkhul Nagas during harvest time in Phalee village too, situated in the west of Ukhrul district in Manipur. [23] Lengvei Kaphung is a challenge for all men of the village. A giant load of paddy tightly packed in traditional specially hand weaved shawls weighs more than 300 kgs or 3 quintals of paddy.The handicrafts using bamboo sliver is another skill which is hand weaved into different shape and size of baskets for the different household purposes like containers, carpet and decorations .

Related Research Articles

Ukhrul Town in Manipur, India

Ukhrul/Hunphun is a town in the state of Manipur, India. Ukhrul is the home of the Tangkhul Naga. It is the administrative headquarter of the Ukhrul district. There are also four sub-divisions in the district for administering the villages in and around it. The villages, however, are governed by the 'village heads'.

Ukhrul district District of Manipur in India

Ukhrul District is an administrative district of the state of Manipur in India with its headquarters at Ukhrul, that is Hunphun. The district occupies the north-eastern corner of the state and it extends between latitudes of 24° 29′ and 25° 42′ N and longitudes 94° 30′ and 94° 45′ E approximately. It shares an international boundary with Myanmar (Burma) on its eastern side and is bounded by Nagaland state in the north, Senapati district and Kangpokpi district in the west and Kamjong district in the south. It has the distinction of being the highest hill station of Manipur. The terrain of the district is hilly with a varying heights of 913 m to 3114 m (MSL). Ukhrul, the district HQ., at an altitude of 2020 m (MSL) is linked with Imphal, the state capital by NH 202 which is about 84 kilometres apart. The district covers an area of 4,544 square kilometres including Kamjong district making it the second largest district of the state after Churachandpur district and has a population of almost 1,83,998 according to Census of India 2011 comprising about 6.44 per cent of the total state population.The Tangkhul Naga tribe constitute the major bulk of the population with other communities such as Kukis, Nepalese and other non-tribals constituting a small percentage of the district population. Administratively, the district which comprises around 200 villages was divided into five sub-divisions, where their boundaries were coterminous with that of the Tribal Development Blocks. There was no statutory town in the district except one census town which was formed in 2011 Census. Recently, Kamjong district was carved out from Ukhrul District as a separate district. Ukhrul District has three assembly constituencies before the bifurcation of the district which are Phungyar Assembly Constituency (43-ST), Ukhrul Assembly Constituency (44-ST) and Chingai Assembly Constituency. The district is best introduced by its rare Shirui Lily,. Also, the district has provided two of Manipur's chief ministers and the only from amongst the hill districts of Manipur, Yangmaso Shaiza the first tribal chief minister of Manipur and Rishang Keishing who is also the first MP from Outer Manipur. William Pettigrew (missionary), an educationist and a Scottish-British Christian Missionary pioneered the western system of education and introduced the Christianity faith among the Tangkhal Naga tribe. Phungyo Baptist Church, Tangrei, Ukhrul, the oldest and the first Christian church of Manipur which still stands today is a testament to his passion for missionary work.

Tangkhul Naga

The Tangkhuls are a major ethnic group living in the Indo-Burma border area occupying the Ukhrul and Kamjong district in Manipur, India and the Somra tract hills, Layshi township, Homalin township and Tamu Township in Burma. Despite this international border, many Tangkhul have continued to regard themselves as "one nation". Tangkhuls living in Burma are also known as Hogo Naga/Eastern Tangkhul/Somra Tangkhul. Also Kokak Naga and Akyaung Ari Naga are included tribally within Tangkhul Naga tribe but their language are quite distinct. The Tangkhul (Somra/Hogo) language in Myanmar is very different from Tangkhul (Ukhrul) spoken in India. The villages in the north like Jessami,kuingai, Soraphung and Chingjaroi (swimai) have quite a different culture than the main Tangkhul group but have more cultural ties with that of the Chakhesang poumai tribes.

Christianity was the second-largest religion in Manipur, a state of India in its Northeast region, according to 2011 census data published by the Government of India.

Peh village in Manipur, India

Peh pronounced "Pe-h" is a village in Ukhrul District, Manipur, India. The village was earlier called 'Paoyi', which is a misconstrued derivative of the original name 'Pehyi' given by outsiders. Peh is approximately 35 kilometers north of Ukhrul district headquarter. The village is partially connected by National Highway 150, Imphal–Kohima via Ukhrul–Jessami Highway. The village comprises two settlement areas: Proper Peh and Peh Ngahurum. The total population of the village is around 3800. The village panchayat (Sangvui) consists of the representative from different clans headed by an elected chairman is the Apex body of the village. All administrative, political and judicial decisions are taken by them. The judiciary power is partly held by King(raja); also known as khulakpa.

Longpi town in Manipur, India

Longpi is a general reference to two villages in the Ukhrul District of the Indian state of Manipur. Longpi is about 37 kilometres (23 mi) north of Ukhrul, connected by National Highway 150. The two villages together have a population of over 8,000.

Somdal Village in Manipur, India

Somdal also called as Shongran is a village located west of Ukhrul in Ukhrul district, Manipur state in India. As per 2011 census, the village has a total of 468 families of 2375 persons of which 1209 are male while 1166 are female Of the total population, 13.14% are in the age group of 0–6 years. The average sex ratio of the village is 964 female per 1000 male. The literacy rate of the village is 92.39%.

Sirarakhong Village in Manipur, India

Sirarakhong also called as Kampha is a village located west of Ukhrul in Ukhrul district, Manipur state, India. As per 2011 census, the village has a total of 202 households with 1243 persons of which 620 are male while 623 are female. Of the total population, 10.86% are in the age group of 0–6 years. The average sex ratio of the village is 1015 female per 1000 male which is higher than the state's average of 930. The literacy rate of the village is 95.22%. Neighbouring villages of Sirarakhong are Teinem, Tungou, Lambui, Sinakeithei, Tushen, Lamlang and Tanrui.

Ngainga Village in Manipur, India

Ngainga also called Ngaimu is a village located west of Ukhrul in Ukhrul district, Manipur state, India. The village is approximately 17 kilometers from Ukhrul. As per 2011 census, the village has a total of 267 households with 2881 persons of which 964 are male while 917 are female. Of the total population, 323 are in the age group of 0–6 years. The average sex ratio of the village is 1015 female per 1000 male which is higher than the state's average of 930. The literacy rate of the village is 92.22%. Neighbouring villages of Ngainga are Seikhor, Tolloi, Phalee Somdal and Tuinem. Ngainga is the birthplace of Luingamla who was shot dead on 24 January 1986 by Indian army personnel for resisting their attempt to rape her.

Phungcham Village in Manipur, India

Phungcham is a village located north of Ukhrul in Ukhrul district, Manipur state, India. The village is approximately 28 kilometers from Ukhrul and is connected by inter village road constructed under PMGSY. Phungcham is flanked by Longpi and Lunghar in the east, Peh in the north, Ukhrul and Halang in the south and Talui in the west.

Kharasom Kharasom in Manipur, India

Kharasom is a village located north of Ukhrul in Ukhrul district, Manipur state, India. The village is fully connected by National Highway 150, Imphal-Kohima road via Jessami. It is 85 km from the District headquarters and approximately 170 km from the state capital Imphal. Kharasom is flanked by Chingjaroi and Razai Khunou in the south, Laii in the west, Wahong and Soraphung to its Northeast, Tusom in the East and Jessami to its north.

Poi, Ukhrul Village in Manipur, India

Poi is a village located north of Ukhrul in Ukhrul district, Manipur state, India. The village is partially connected by National Highway 150, Imphal-Kohima road via Jessami. Poi is 68 kilometers away from Ukhrul via Awangkasom and about 3 kilometers and 5 kilometers away from Indo-Myanmar border pillar number 126 and 130 respectively. Poi is flanked by Challou in the North, Chingai in the north west, Ngahui, Kuirei and Marem in the west, Huishu and Khamasom in the south. MK Preshow Shimray, the Ex- MLA from Chingai Assembly Constituency and also the Deputy Speaker of the present Manipur Legislative Assembly hails from this village.

Shirui Village in Manipur, India

Shirui also misnomerly called 'Shiroy'/Shiroi is a village located north of Ukhrul in Ukhrul district, Manipur state, India. The village is 15 kilometers from Ukhrul. National Highway 150 Imphal-Kohima via Jessami passes through the village. The village is divided into two parts Shirui ato and Shirui aze, however, both the parts are under one chief. Shirui is famous for the rich and flora found on Shirui Kashong or Shirui peak and especially for blooming of the rare Lilium mackliniae during the start of Monsoon. The village is flanked by Ukhrul in the west, Langdang in the south, Mapum in the east, Sihai in the North east and Lunghar in the north. Locally inhabitants speak Shirui dialect which belongs to the Tibeto-Burman language family.

Langdang Village in Manipur, India

Langdang is a village located north of Ukhrul in Ukhrul district, Manipur state, India. The village is 13 kilometers from Ukhrul. National Highway 150 Imphal-Kohima via Jessami passes through the village. The village is divided into two major parts, Langdang Khullen and Langdang Phungthar; however, both the parts are under one chief. The village is famous for largescale plum cultivation. The village is flanked by Mapum in the east, Shirui in the north, Ukhrul in the west and Choithar in the south.

Phungyar Village in Manipur, India

Phungyar is a village located south of Ukhrul in Ukhrul district, Manipur state, India. The village is about 50 kilometers from Ukhrul and is partially connected by National Highway 150 that connects Imphal and Kohima via Ukhrul and Jessami. The village is flanked by Khambi in the south, Loushing in the north and alang in the west. Locally, the inhabitants speak common tangkhul language and native village dialect which belongs to the Tibeto-Burman language family.

Lui Ngai Ni is the seed-sowing festival celebrated by the Naga tribes of Manipur India. The festival heralds the season of seed sowing and marks the start of the year for the Nagas and the festival was declared a state holiday since 1988.

Phungyo Baptist Church

Phungyo Baptist Church, Ukhrul, was the first Christian Church of Manipur, India. It was constructed and established, when Reverend William Pettigrew baptized and converted twelve Tangkhul Naga to Protestant Christian Baptist faith in 1901.

The Reverend William Pettigrew was a British Christian missionary who came to India in 1890, eventually introducing western education in Manipur, and converting the Tangkhul Naga Tribe, inhabiting Ukhrul District to Christianity, "in masses".

Khamlang Village

Khamlang village is situated on the southern part of Ukhrul District, Manipur, India. It is inhabited by Khameon a Tangkhul Naga tribe. It is situated 2 km away from headquarter of Sub-Division, Kasom Khullen, 137 km away from district headquarter Ukhrul and 59 km from state capital Imphal, Manipur.

Shirui Lily Festival is an annual cultural state festival of Manipur organised by Manipur Tourism Department every year. Initially, the festival was celebrated by the locals of Shirui village in Ukhrul to pay tribute to the state flower Shirui Lily that blooms from the last week of May through the second week of June. In 2017, Shirui Lily Festival was declared as a state festival by the Government of Manipur.

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  22. Otrei.jpg
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