Spectator sport

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An association football match being watched by a large audience. Fan fest Brasilia.jpg
An association football match being watched by a large audience.

A spectator sport is a sport in which the notional reasonable person [1] cannot take part in due to barriers to entry, such as high level of training required or specialist equipment.

Many popular sports are not spectator sports, for example association football.

Reference

  1. State v. Cripps, 533 N.W.2d 388 (1995) Negligence and the 'Reasonable Person'. Available at: https://injury.findlaw.com/accident-injury-law/standards-of-care-and-the-reasonable-person.html Retrieved on September 11, 2020.

See also

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