Swimming at the 1924 Summer Olympics

Last updated
Swimming
at the Games of the IX Olympiad
Venue Piscine des Tourelles
Dates13–20 July
No. of events11
Competitors169 from 23 nations
  1920
1928  

At the 1924 Summer Olympics in Paris, eleven swimming events were contested, six for men and five for women. The competitions were held from Sunday July 13, 1924, to Sunday July 20, 1924.

Contents

There were 169 participants from 23 countries competing. The United States team, coached by Bill Bachrach, won 19 of the 33 medals, and 9 of the 11 gold medals.

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1US flag 48 stars.svg  United States  (USA)95519
2Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)1214
3Flag of Australia.svg  Australia  (AUS)1124
4Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)0224
5Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium  (BEL)0101
6Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946; 3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary  (HUN)0011
Totals (6 nations)11111133

Medal summary

Men's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
100 m freestyle
details
Johnny Weissmuller
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Duke Kahanamoku
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Samuel Kahanamoku
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
400 m freestyle
details
Johnny Weissmuller
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Arne Borg
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Boy Charlton
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia
1500 m freestyle
details
Boy Charlton
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia
Arne Borg
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Frank Beaurepaire
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia
100 m backstroke
details
Warren Kealoha
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Paul Wyatt
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Károly Bartha
Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946; 3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary
200 m breaststroke
details
Bob Skelton
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Joseph De Combe
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium
Bill Kirschbaum
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
4×200 m freestyle relay
details
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States  (USA)
Ralph Breyer
Harry Glancy
Dick Howell
Wally O'Connor
Johnny Weissmuller
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia  (AUS)
Frank Beaurepaire
Boy Charlton
Moss Christie
Ernest Henry
Ivan Stedman
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)
Åke Borg
Arne Borg
Thor Henning
Gösta Persson
Orvar Trolle
Georg Werner

Women's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
100 m freestyle
details
Ethel Lackie
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Mariechen Wehselau
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Gertrude Ederle
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
400 m freestyle
details
Martha Norelius
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Helen Wainwright
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Gertrude Ederle
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
100 m backstroke
details
Sybil Bauer
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Phyllis Harding
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
Aileen Riggin
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
200 m breaststroke
details
Lucy Morton
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
Agnes Geraghty
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Gladys Carson
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
4×100 m freestyle relay
details
US flag 48 stars.svg  United States  (USA)
Euphrasia Donnelly
Gertrude Ederle
Ethel Lackie
Mariechen Wehselau
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)
Florence Barker
Constance Jeans
Grace McKenzie
Iris Tanner
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)
Aina Berg
Gurli Ewerlund
Wivan Pettersson
Hjördis Töpel

Participating nations

A total of 169 swimmers (118 men and 51 women) from 23 nations (men from 22 nations - women from 10 nations) competed at the Paris Games:

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