Tabler, Oklahoma

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Tabler, Oklahoma
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Tabler
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Tabler
Coordinates: 35°02′39″N97°49′11″W / 35.04417°N 97.81972°W / 35.04417; -97.81972 Coordinates: 35°02′39″N97°49′11″W / 35.04417°N 97.81972°W / 35.04417; -97.81972
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Grady
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
GNIS feature ID 1100871 1825323

Tabler is an unincorporated community in eastern Grady County, Oklahoma. [1] It is located at the western end of State Highway 39, where it meets U.S. Highway 62/277/SH-9.

Notable citizens

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