Ted Nugent (album)

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Ted Nugent
Ted nugent album cover.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedSeptember 1975 (1975-09) [1]
Recorded1975
StudioThe Sound Pit, Atlanta, Georgia
Genre
Length38:33
Label Epic
Producer
Ted Nugent chronology
Tooth Fang & Claw
(1974)
Ted Nugent
(1975)
Free-for-All
(1976)
Singles from Ted Nugent
  1. "Where Have You Been All My Life" / "Motor City Madhouse"
    Released: 1975
  2. "Hey Baby" / "Stormtroopin'"
    Released: 1975

Ted Nugent is the debut studio album by American hard rock musician Ted Nugent. The album was released in September 1975, by Epic Records. It was released after the disbanding of his former group The Amboy Dukes.

Contents

Background

Tired of The Amboy Dukes' lack of effort and discipline, Nugent decided he had enough and left the group. He took a three-month vacation (his first ever) clearing his head in the Colorado wilderness, spending his time deer hunting and enjoying the outdoors. [3] Renewed, Nugent returned to civilization in search of a new direction and a new band. Joining him in the Ted Nugent Band were former Amboy Duke Rob Grange on bass, along with Cliff Davies (ex-If) on drums and finally, from a local Michigan band called Scott which had opened for the Dukes previously, a singer/guitarist named Derek St. Holmes.

The new group hit the road and then the studio, forming the songs which would send their first album into the Billboard Top 30 and into the multi-platinum range. The first track, "Stranglehold", would set the stage for Nugent's career: an eight-minute plus guitar attack with vocals by St. Holmes and Nugent, a long solo played on Nugent's Gibson Byrdland guitar recorded in one take and a unique phase bass guitar effect by Grange. St. Holmes' sang tracks such as "Queen of the Forest", "Hey Baby", "Just What the Doctor Ordered" and "Snakeskin Cowboys", the latter featuring an 8-string Hagström bass played by Grange, which would prove to be staples of the band's concert tours for years to come. "Motor City Madhouse" is an ode to Ted's hometown of Detroit.

The album was produced by Tom Werman and former If manager Lew Futterman. Nugent said about the album, "If anyone wanted to know what rock 'n roll was all about, that's the only album they'd need". [3]

"One had to recognize that there was a definite synergy between the band and Nugent", said producer Tom Werman.

Reception

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svg [2]
Classic Rock Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svg [4]
Collector's Guide to Heavy Metal 8/10 [5]

In 2005, Ted Nugent was ranked number 487 in Rock Hard magazine's book of The 500 Greatest Rock & Metal Albums of All Time. [6]

"Stranglehold" has been ranked 31st greatest guitar solo of all time by Guitar World . [7]

Track listing

All songs are credited as "written and arranged by Ted Nugent", except "Hey Baby", which is credited as "written and arranged by Derek St. Holmes". In Martin Popoff's book Epic Ted Nugent, Nugent admits that "Stranglehold" was co-written by Rob Grange, who never received a royalty share. [3] Derek St. Holmes claims the album was co-written by the whole band, and that Nugent took sole credit as a way to not pay them royalties. [8]

Side one
No.TitleLength
1."Stranglehold"8:22
2."Stormtroopin'"3:07
3."Hey Baby"4:00
4."Just What the Doctor Ordered"3:43
Side two
No.TitleLength
5."Snakeskin Cowboys"4:38
6."Motor City Madhouse"4:30
7."Where Have You Been All My Life"4:04
8."You Make Me Feel Right at Home"2:54
9."Queen of the Forest"3:34
CD edition bonus track
No.TitleLength
10."Magic Party"2:55

Personnel

Band members
Additional musicians
Production

Charts

Album

YearChartPosition
1976 Billboard 200 (US) [9] 28
Australia (Kent Music Report) [10] 37
UK Album Chart [11] 56

Singles

YearTitleChartPosition
1976"Hey Baby" Billboard Hot 100 (US) [12] 72

Certifications

CountryOrganizationYearSales
U.S. RIAA 19862x Platinum (2,000,000) [13]
Canada CRIA 1978Gold (50,000) [14]

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The Amboy Dukes were an American rock band formed in 1964 in Chicago, Illinois, and later based in Detroit, Michigan. They are known for their one hit single "Journey to the Center of the Mind". The band's name comes from the title of a novel by Irving Shulman. In the UK, the group's records were released under the name of The American Amboy Dukes, because of the existence of a British group with the same name.

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<i>Free-for-All</i> (Ted Nugent album) 1976 studio album by Ted Nugent

Free-For-All is the second studio album by American hard rock musician Ted Nugent. The album was released in October 1976, by Epic Records. It was his first album to go platinum.

<i>Double Live Gonzo!</i> 1978 live album by Ted Nugent

Double Live Gonzo! is a live album by the American hard rock guitarist Ted Nugent, released as a double LP in 1978. In addition to live versions of songs from previous albums, this double album also contains original material played live, including: "Yank Me, Crank Me" and "Gonzo". The album has reached 3× Platinum status in the United States.

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Spirit of the Wild is the eleventh studio album by American hard rock musician Ted Nugent. The album was released in May 1995 by Atlantic Records. It was produced by Mike Lutz from the Brownsville Station rock band, and engineered by Jim Vitti and Mike Lutz.

<i>Call of the Wild</i> (Ted Nugent and the Amboy Dukes album) 1973 studio album by Ted Nugent and The Amboy Dukes

Call of the Wild is the sixth and penultimate album by The Amboy Dukes, credited as "Ted Nugent & The Amboy Dukes". Recorded in the summer of 1973, it is the first of two albums released on Frank Zappa's DiscReet Records, followed by Tooth Fang & Claw, the band's final album, in 1974. In 1977, both albums were reissued by Warner Bros as the compilation Two Originals of... Ted Nugent.

"Stranglehold" is the debut single and the first track from Ted Nugent's self-titled 1975 album. The vocals are by Derek St. Holmes. However, the "Sometimes you wanna get higher" verse is sung by Nugent. Nugent admits that the song was cowritten by Rob Grange, who received no share.

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<i>Sweden Rocks</i>

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<i>Migration</i> (The Amboy Dukes album) 1969 studio album by The Amboy Dukes

Migration is the third studio album by The Amboy Dukes. It was released in 1969 on Mainstream Records . On this album, Rusty Day replaced John Drake on vocals and guitarist Ted Nugent, for the first time, took lead vocals on select tracks. The song "I'm Not a Juvenile Delinquent" is a cover of the 1956 song by Frankie Lymon and The Teenagers.

Rob Grange, is an American rock bass guitarist, best known for his work with Ted Nugent and his unique phase bass lines in the song "Stranglehold".

References

  1. "New LP/Tape Releases". Billboard . Billboard Publications, Inc.: 66 September 13, 1975.
  2. 1 2 Prato, Greg. "Ted Nugent - Ted Nugent review". AllMusic . Rovi Corporation . Retrieved December 13, 2011.
  3. 1 2 3 Popoff, Martin (2012). Epic Ted Nugent. Toronto, Canada: Power Chord Press. pp. 64–65.
  4. Dome, Malcolm (February 2005). "Ted Nugent". Classic Rock . No. 76. p. 108.
  5. Popoff, Martin (October 2003). The Collector's Guide to Heavy Metal: Volume 1: The Seventies. Burlington, Ontario, Canada: Collector's Guide Publishing. p. 206. ISBN   978-1894959025.
  6. Best of Rock & Metal - Die 500 stärksten Scheiben aller Zeiten. Rock Hard. 2005. p. 12. ISBN   3-89880-517-4.
  7. "50 Greatest Guitar Solos". guitarworld.com. January 29, 2009. Archived from the original on September 3, 2012. Retrieved September 7, 2012.
  8. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTb_yory7tc
  9. "Ted Nugent Chart History: Billboard 200". Billboard.com. Billboard . Retrieved October 8, 2018.
  10. Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992 (illustrated ed.). St Ives, N.S.W.: Australian Chart Book. p. 220. ISBN   0-646-11917-6.
  11. "Ted Nugent Official Charts". Official Charts Company . Retrieved October 8, 2018.
  12. "Ted Nugent Chart History: Hot 100". Billboard.com. Billboard . Retrieved October 8, 2018.
  13. "RIAA Database: Search for Ted Nugent". Recording Industry Association of America . Retrieved December 16, 2011.
  14. "Gold Platinum Database: Search for Ted Nugent". Music Canada . Retrieved December 16, 2011.