Thomas Swadkins House

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Thomas Swadkins House
ArlingtonMA ThomasSwadkinsHouse.jpg
The house in 2008
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Location160 Westminster Avenue,
Arlington, Massachusetts
Coordinates 42°25′48″N71°11′13″W / 42.43000°N 71.18694°W / 42.43000; -71.18694 Coordinates: 42°25′48″N71°11′13″W / 42.43000°N 71.18694°W / 42.43000; -71.18694
Built1882
Architectural styleGothic, Italianate
MPS Arlington MRA
NRHP reference No. 85001048 [1]
Added to NRHPApril 18, 1985

The Thomas Swadkins House is a historic house in Arlington, Massachusetts. This 2+12-story wood frame was built c. 1882, and features both Gothic and Italianate styling. The gable decorations and porch railing are Gothic, while the house massing and brackets are Italianate, as are the window surrounds and the round-arch window on the right side. It was one of the first houses built when the Crescent Hill area was developed in the 1880s. [2]

The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. [1] It was renovated and expanded in 2009.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. April 15, 2008.
  2. "MACRIS inventory record for Thomas Swadkins House". Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved 2014-03-30.