Thomas and Lydia Gilbert Farm

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Thomas and Lydia Gilbert Farm

THOMAS AND LYDIA GILBERT FARM.jpg

Thomas and Lydia Gilbert Farmhouse, October 2010
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Location 5042 Anderson Rd., Holicong, Pennsylvania
Coordinates 40°20′14″N75°3′36″W / 40.33722°N 75.06000°W / 40.33722; -75.06000 Coordinates: 40°20′14″N75°3′36″W / 40.33722°N 75.06000°W / 40.33722; -75.06000
Area 9.8 acres (4.0 ha)
Built 1711, 1735, 1808, 1812
Architectural style Georgian, Other, Vernacular Georgian
NRHP reference # 89000351 [1]
Added to NRHP May 5, 1989

Thomas and Lydia Gilbert Farm, also known as the Datestone Farm, is a historic home and farm located at Holicong, Buckingham Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The original section of the farmhouse was built in 1711, with additions made in 1735 and 1812. Each section is marked with a datestone. The house consists of two 2 1/2-story, stone sections with a unifying cornice, roofline, and slate-covered gable roof. It is in a vernacular Georgian style. The house was restored in 1970-1972. and a frame addition completed on the west side of the house. Also on the property are a contributing stone and frame bank barn, stone and frame wagon house (c. 1840), and a stone spring house with a datestone of 1808. [2]

Holicong, Pennsylvania Populated place in Pennsylvania, United States

Holicong is a populated place situated in Buckingham Township in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. It has an estimated elevation of 236 feet (72 m) above sea level.

Buckingham Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania Township in Pennsylvania, United States

Buckingham Township is a township in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 20,075 at the 2010 census. Buckingham takes its name from Buckingham in Buckinghamshire, England. Buckingham Township was once known as Greenville and was once the historic county seat of the English Bucks County.

Bucks County, Pennsylvania County in Pennsylvania, United States

Bucks County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 625,249, making it the fourth-most populous county in Pennsylvania and the 99th-most populous county in the United States. The county seat is Doylestown. The county is named after the English county of Buckinghamshire or more precisely, its shortname.

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1989. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "National Historic Landmarks & National Register of Historic Places in Pennsylvania" (Searchable database). CRGIS: Cultural Resources Geographic Information System.Note: This includes Jeffrey L. Marshall and Nancy Van Dolsen (January 1989). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Thomas and Lydia Gilbert Farm" (PDF). Retrieved 2012-09-30.